chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Akiba Rubinstein vs Grigory Levenfish
"Shining Ruby" (game of the day Oct-04-2017)
Karlsbad (1911), rd 17, Sep-12
French Defense: Classical. Rubinstein Variation (C14)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 29 times; par: 36 [what's this?]

Annotations by Aron Nimzowitsch.      [48 more games annotated by Nimzowitsch]

NOTE: You are using our new chess viewer, "Olga." For more info see the Olga Quickstart Guide. You can switch back to the old viewer (pgn4web) from the pulldown menu below. If you have questions or suggestions see our Olga chessforum.

explore this opening
find similar games 3 more Rubinstein/Levenfish games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Some games have photographs. These are denoted in the game list with the icon.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-12-05  MidnightDuffer: Covered as the Chess Movie "Pawn One, Pawn None" in I.A. Horowitz's "How to win in the Chess Openings" (which he himself says in the book right away is a misnomer). Levenfisch may have come up short on a move or two himself; but I am sure Rubinstein would still win in a dynamic way.

Note: the Horowitz book starts out 1. e4 NOT 1.d4 but this is the way it is in the Horowitz book, if anyone has it. This game, analysed by Nimzovitch has the d4 start.

Black comes up with a clever idea and sac on move 16. but overall, it seemed to weaken the Queenside; and subsequently somewhat responsible for the loss.

May-06-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: Amusing notes by Nimzovitch, taking Rubinstein to task for winning by a scintillating combination rather the pure bishop ending.

"It would have pleased me even better if the decision had been brought about in a bishop ending instead of through the somewhat "tacked on" action of the passed pawn at c7; for instance from such a position as White: King at e5, bishop at h3, pawns at a2, c3, f4, h2. Black: King at e7, Bishop atf7, pawns at a6, d5, e6, h7; with the continuation f5, ...exf5, Bxf5 and white wins the d-pawn and the game. We should then have the general idea more markedly broughtout, namely first to keep the e-pawn and the d-pawn under restraint, then to blockade them and only at the end to destroy them. But as played the game was instructive enough! (e.g., moves 13, 16, and 18). "

May-06-05  aw1988: Yes, Nimzowitsch certainly was a man of taste.
May-06-05  fgh: Nimzowitsch, as usual writtes great notes about a great game :-)
May-07-05  OverDjinn: 13Nb6 seems like a bad plan. b5 or perhaps exchanging in the center and occupying c5 with the knight seems to hold better. 21g5 also seems like a mistake since retaining queens would both help black with defense and with consolidation since he is behind in development. 21Qf5 perhaps, anything but the text. What is even more startling is that after such an aggressive, risky move as 21g5, black chooses a plan to just flick his bishop out on a quiet developing move with 23...Bd7. The initiative is really tough to understand and play to, that's for sure.
Dec-07-07  Karpova: <OverDjinn: 13Nb6 seems like a bad plan. b5 or perhaps exchanging in the center and occupying c5 with the knight seems to hold better.>

Hans Kmoch on 13...Nb6:
<Why not 13...b5, which appears even stronger? Because thereafter a neat combination would be decisive: 14.dxc5 Nxc5 15.Nxd5 exd5 16.Qxd5+ Qe6 17.Ng5!>

Apr-03-08  Ulhumbrus: 18 Nd4, in occupying the central point d4, obstructs the Black Queen on the long diagonal and after Black captures the Nc3 with his pawn instead, that blocks the long diagonal for Black.

Nimzovich says <It would have pleased me even better if the decision had been brought about in a bishop ending instead of through the somewhat "tacked on" action of the passed pawn at c7; for instance from such a position as White: King at e5, bishop at h3, pawns at a2, c3, f4, h2. Black: King at e7, Bishop atf7, pawns at a6, d5, e6, h7; with the continuation f5, ...exf5, Bxf5 and white wins the d-pawn and the game. We should then have the general idea more markedly broughtout, namely first to keep the e-pawn and the d-pawn under restraint, then to blockade them and only at the end to destroy them. But as played the game was instructive enough! (e.g., moves 13, 16, and 18). > If we imagine what Lasker or Capablanca's view on this might be, it might be that the value of the c5 pawn after the pawn capture dxc5 must count as a part of the value of White's position, it will affect the evaluation, and it may change the resource which White can use to win the game the most quickly or easily. I don't believe that either Lasker or Capablanca would hold as sacred any preconceived method of winning, if some choice on the opponent's part were to present them with a quicker or easier method of winning.

Oct-08-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Nimzovich also appreciates Rubinstein's game (or he wouldn't have put it in "My System" he had it in his book (according to Hans Kmoch in my old book of Rubinstein's games). under the caption "First to restrain, then to blockade, and finally to destroy." so his comment is only that it would have illustrated that better with a different scenario (position). He doesn't say Rubinstein's method is "against" his system. He is clearly being somewhat "wry".
Apr-22-12  bystander: Very well played by Rubinstein. For me it is very difficult to find any improvement for black, other than not playing 9..f6 and 12...a6? (I would play cd4x on move 9 or 12 and 12...a6 in combination with Nb6 does not make so much sense to me).
Jun-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  bharat123: 21.Re5 appears to be strong, denying any counterplay for black. White can liesurely pick up the c3 pawn and pound on e6 with all pieces. also whites c pawn can march while black is burdened with defending the weak e pawn.
Oct-04-17  Strelets: You know you're in for some fun when you see the words, "Notes by Aron Nimzowitsch."
Oct-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: nice finish!
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
Annotated games by Nimzovitsch
by macaoui
French Def: Classical. Rubinstein (C14) 1-0Notes by Nimzowitsch
from Annotations by Various Authorities & Fredthebear by fredthebear
Karlsbad 1911
by JoseTigranTalFischer
October 4: Shining Ruby
from Game of the Day 2017 by Phony Benoni
Central play over flank play
from BwanaVa's favorite games by BwanaVa
French Def: Classical. Rubinstein (C14) 1-0Notes by Nimzowitsch
from French Classical Music 3...Nf6 by fredthebear
French Def: Classical. Rubinstein (C14) 1-0Notes by Nimzowitsch
from Memo '17 to C Quad by fredthebear
I.A. Horowitz's "How to win in the Chess Openings" Chess Movie
from Queenside Raps and Zaps by fredthebear
Dry Rubinstein
by Gottschalk
Akiba Rubinstein's Best Games
by KingG
Pawn chain strategy
from Learn from the great Rubinstein by timothee3331
estrategias 2 de suetin
by LESTRADAR
I.A. Horowitz's "How to win in the Chess Openings" Chess Movie
from Pins Ins and Outs, All About Pins ECO C by fredthebear
French Defence - Classical with Nb5
by gr8song
jungol's favorite games
by jungol
First to restrain, then to blockade, and finally to destroy
from Rubinstein's Chess Masterpieces by Karpova
bengalcat47's favorite games4
by bengalcat47
French Def: Classical. Rubinstein (C14) 1-0Notes by Nimzowitsch
from French Classical 5.e5 Compiled by Steenmuur by fredthebear
I.A. Horowitz's "How to win in the Chess Openings" Chess Movie
from 1900s Grandmasters Annointed by fredthebear
French Def: Classical. Rubinstein (C14) 1-0Notes by Nimzowitsch
from WINNING w/the FRENCH Compiled by hitsujyun by fredthebear
plus 24 more collections (not shown)


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2017, Chessgames Services LLC