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Robert James Fischer vs Samuel Reshevsky
"Go Fisch" (game of the day Mar-25-2010)
US Championship (1958/59), New York, NY USA, rd 6, Dec-??
Sicilian Defense: Old Sicilian. Open (B32)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 10 OF 11 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White will win a piece and the end will come soon.
Sep-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: < White will win a piece and the end will come soon.>

Seems to me that 42...Rb1+ retains both Black pieces. For example, after 43.Kh2 then 43...Nf7 or even ...Ne6. However, the passed a-pawn will be decisive.

Jan-20-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <WorstPlayerEver>

Um, how can you possibly make that claim with me around?

Jan-20-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: New analysis:

9. e5 Nb3 10. ef6 Na1 11. fg7 Kg7 and now:
12. 0-0! Nc2

(if 12... e5 13. Nf3 d5 14. Qd2 d4 15. Bh6 Kg8 16. Bf8 Qf8 17. Ne4 Nc2 18. Qc2)

13. Qc2 d5

(if 13... d6 14. Qd2 Kh8)

I: 14. Bf4 a6 15. Na4 Bd7 16. Qc3 Kg8 17. Bc7 Rc8 18. Bd8 Rc3 19. Nc3

II: 14. Bf4 f6 15. Ncb5 Qb6 16. Bc7 Qa6 17. Re1 e5 18. Re5

III: 14. Bf4 e6 15. Qd2 Kg8 16 Ndb5 a6 17. Nd6

A: 17... h5 18. h3 Kh7 19. Na4 f6 20. Bg3 e5 21. Qd5 Bd7 22. Nc5 Bc6 23. Qe6 Ra7 24. Rc1 b5 25. Rd1 Qe7 26 f3 Rfa8 27. Rc1 Rd8 28. Qe7 Qe7 29. Nce4 Be4 30. Ne4 Re6 31. Bh4 Rf8 32. Bg5 Rf7 33. Bd2 h4 34. Bg5 f5 35. Nc5 Rc6 36. b4 a6 37. a3

B: 17... Bd7 18. Qd4 f6 19. Re1 g5 20. Bg3 Bc8 21. h4 gh4 22. Qg4 Kh8 23. Qh4 Qd7 24. Qd4 Qg7 25. Na4 e5 26. Re5 Qg4 27. Rd5 Qd4 28. Rd4 Be6 29. Nc5 Ba2 30. Nd7

Jan-20-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: @perfidious
Lol I had to think in for a while.
Did you see that Bobby after 12 0-0 finally found a home? ;)
Jan-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: It's also worth noticing that 15 year old Bobby did actually analysed and played the game correctly until move 19. Even with the knowledge of today that's mind boggling.

I wonder when Reshevsky would have resigned if Bobby had analysed the game even further! :)

19. b4 a6 20. a4 Bb6 21. Kh1 Nd4 22. c3 Nc6 23. f4 h6 24. b5 Na5 25. Qb4 Re8 26. c4 e5 27. Qc3 Bd4 28. Qa5 b6 29. Qd2 ab5 30. cb5 Ba1 31. Ra1 ef4 32. Qd4 Kh7 33. Qb6 Bf5 34. Qd4 g5 35. Qe5 Bd7 36. Nc5

Jan-21-16  Sally Simpson: "For some reason I think that Reshevsky played on and kept defending out of spite; losing in 42 moves looks better than losing Queen and resigning in 12 moves."

In 'Snatched Opportunities on the Chessboard' by William Lombardy, game 91. He gives 11.Ne6!! and Black resigned.

Despite kicking off the game with:

"A World's Championship contender fell into this one. We omit names, dates and places to protect the innocent."

Lombardy tells us the game is Fischer - Reshevsky US.Ch. [no year] in the players index.

Lombardy played in the 1958/59 US Champiomship

US Championship (1958/59)

So he must have known more moves were played.....or were they? (c'mon own up, who added these extra moves.)

Jan-21-16  Howard: I don't know about nowadays, but there was a time where if someone in a professional tournament had a dead-lost position after, say, 15 moves he would purposely drag the game out for another, say, 10-15 moves so as to try to draw attention away from the game.

In other words, if he resigned after 15 moves, word would get around quickly about the fiasco, and it would thus increase the chances of the game ending up in a chess magazine---thus, embarrassing the loser.

But, now that we're in the 21st century, that little delaying tactic probably doesn't work anymore.

May-03-16  GarloPemberton: Awesome! Bobby Fischer was a baller.
May-03-16  RookFile: The funny thing is that Reshevsky appeared to play excellent chess after losing the queen. The final position, where he resigned, was arguably the best position he had after the blunder.
Jul-26-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <WhiteRook48: Tarrasch once fell for this trap, I hear >

W Von Holzhausen vs Tarrasch, 1912 (Different opening, but similar combo.)

Sep-22-16  The Kings Domain: This is one of numerous games that highlight Fischer's genius. His best games are truly among the freshest, most entertaining, and most inspiring in the game. I never understood why people rave about Kasparov when a game like this exists for all to see.
Sep-23-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <The Kings Domain: This is one of numerous games that highlight Fischer's genius. His best games are truly among the freshest, most entertaining, and most inspiring in the game. I never understood why people rave about Kasparov when a game like this exists for all to see.>

Your post makes no sense. Maybe it is some kind of elaborate troll?

People rave about Kasparov because he was a genius who played beautiful, brilliant chess for decades. If you need examples of his greatness, go to the memorable games listed on his player page and start clicking. And that is just scratching the surface.

Fischer played some great games too, but this is not one of them. Reshevsky played into published opening analysis that Fischer knew about but he didn't. As a result he was dead lost at the very beginning. Despite that, he was able to prolong the game all the way to move 42, as Fischer had a hard time figuring out how to finish him off.

No knock on Fischer, he was 15 when this was played and a fraction of the strength he later attained. But this is not a game that <highlight[s] Fischer's genius>. It highlights his studiousness, I guess, and really highlights Reshevsky's relative lack if it.

Sep-23-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <The King's Domain> This game doesn't really highlight Fischer's studiousness, even. According to <Profile of a Prodigy>, most of the strong players in the room were fully aware of the published analysis. But Reshevsky wasn't!
Sep-23-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: You forget one thing about Fischer's approach: he probably read it in Russian. And, by the way, genius is the product of study. Fischer spoke several languages. He was that narrow minded, you see.
Sep-23-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <WorstPlayerEver: You forget one thing about Fischer's approach: he probably read it in Russian. And, by the way, genius is the product of study. Fischer spoke several languages. He was that narrow minded, you see.>

I don't know what language Fischer read it in, but Wade published analysis including that trap in the November 1958 edition of BCM.

Sep-23-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: <keypusher>

<keypusher>

Well, Sochi is Russian. So maybe the KGB said to the CIA: "Bobby's gotta read this!"

Any way, peapusher, it's most clear that your confidence in me must be evaluated as 0.00

Sep-23-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <WorstPlayerEver: <keypusher> <keypusher>

Well, Sochi is Russian. So maybe the KGB said to the CIA: "Bobby's gotta read this!"

Any way, peapusher, it's most clear that your confidence in me must be evaluated as 0.00>

0.00=complete equality, right?

Anyway, there's also a story that the line was in Shakhmaty v SSSR (at least I think that was the magazine), as reported in <Profile>. So maybe Bobby did read it in Russian.

Sep-23-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: <keypusher>

Thanks for the info. Lol j/k I really have no clue. Because Fischer was not the only one who seemed to know the variation at the time.

First would have to study the history of the variation.

Sep-24-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: If you play chess for a living shouldn't you know this sort of thing?
Sep-24-16  beatgiant: <HeMateMe>
<If you play chess for a living> If you work as an accountant for a living, as Reshevsky did, evidently not.
Sep-25-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < beatgiant: <HeMateMe> <If you play chess for a living> If you work as an accountant for a living, as Reshevsky did, evidently not.>

At least in the mid-50s Reshevsky was a full-time professional chessplayer. A number of wealthy chess fans had arranged for him to have an $5,000 annual income stipend, decent money for the time. I don't know when that ended. Once Fischer showed up they might have wondered if they should be paying him instead...

Sep-25-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: A few months earlier it was Fischer who apparently wasn't familiar with the wrinkles in this line: Fischer vs Panno, 1958
Sep-25-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Young Garry not doing his homework: Kasparov vs Kupreichik, 1979
Dec-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I played this trap after I had castled as I had read David Levy's book about Fischer who had seen the analysis leading to this line. Analysing it with my machine in the game I played (below) it is a clear win. But not as Fischer played as taking by Reshevsky on b3 with the N then after fxg7 Re8 and White only has a small advantage.

Here is what happened in my game.

[Event "New Zealand Reserve 2008"]
[Site "Auckland. NZ"]
[Date "2008.01.16"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Richard Taylor"]
[Black "Neil Cruden"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 g6 5. Bc4 Bg7 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Nc3 O-O 8. O-O a6 9. Bb3 Na5 10. e5 Ne8 11. Bxf7+ Kxf7 12. Ne6 1-0

The day after I won this game we heard that Fischer had died. So I owe one to Fischer.

But in Fischer's game Reshevsky went straight to a5. After 9. e5 ...Nxb3 is best as if 10. exf6 Nxa1 11. fxg7 Re8! and black is well in the game.

Clever as this is it isn't a demonstration of high level chess by anyone.

(But 11. ... Nxc2+ is not so good.)

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