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Alexander Alekhine vs Akiba Rubinstein
"A Taste of His Own Medicine" (game of the day Jan-06-2007)
Karlsbad (1923), Karlsbad CZE, rd 1, Apr-30
Queen's Gambit Declined: Orthodox Defense. Rubinstein Attack (D64)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-12-07  sanyas: "I can see combinations as well as Alekhine, but ..." you know the rest.
Oct-18-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: After <19... Kf8=> there is no win for white.
Dec-23-08  WhiteRook48: where was Rubinstein's mistake?
Feb-06-09  WhiteRook48: whoa, best game by Alekhine ever
Feb-18-09  Ulhumbrus: After 25 Bg6!! in the event of 25...fxg6 White's Queen threatens to land upon h7 not in one move from a square like g6, but in three moves from the square c6 by Qc6-e4, Qe4xg6 and Qg6-h7.

It takes White's Queen three moves to reach the square h7 from the square c6.

In this way instead of threatening mate in one move from a square on the King side, White's Queen threatens mate in three moves from a square on the Queen side.

Feb-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <Ulhumbrus: After 25 Bg6!! in the event of 25...fxg6 White's Queen threatens to land upon h7 not in one move from a square like g6, but in three moves from the square c6 by Qc6-e4, Qe4xg6 and Qg6-h7. It takes White's Queen three moves to reach the square h7 from the square c6.

<<<In this way instead of threatening mate in one move from a square on the King side, White's Queen threatens mate in three moves from a square on the Queen side.>>>>

Wow, that is an *amazing* concetion by Alekhine.

Feb-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Alekhine vs Rubinstein, 1923

Game 121
from Game Collection: Garry Kasparov's On My Great Predecessors (1B) by AdrianP

Feb-18-09  TheChessGuy: Akiba was among the strongest players never to become World Champion. I put him in that class with Korchnoi and Keres. It was outstanding for him to achieve what he did, as he was wracked with severe mental problems. When the Nazis invaded Belgium and proceeded with their revolting genocide, they came across Rubinstein. He was so far gone that they didn't even bother sending him to a camp.
Feb-23-09  Ulhumbrus: <TheChessGuy: Akiba was among the strongest players never to become World Champion. I put him in that class with Korchnoi and Keres. It was outstanding for him to achieve what he did, as he was wracked with severe mental problems. When the Nazis invaded Belgium and proceeded with their revolting genocide, they came across Rubinstein. He was so far gone that they didn't even bother sending him to a camp.> It could be that some top masters such as Nimzovich and Rubinstein were unable to marry, as they lacked a comfortable and secure income, and that the lack of a wife affected their mental health. That was a part of the price they paid for being professional chess masters in those days. For that matter the majority of chess masters are probably not secure financially today either. Professionalism in a game becomes possible if there is a large enough audience willing to pay for it. It may be that the economic level of the working classes will have to be brought up to the level of the middle classes before educational and cultural advancement can follow, and a sufficiently widespread interest in chess can follow thereafter.
Feb-23-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <It could be that some top masters such as Nimzovich and Rubinstein were unable to marry, as they lacked a comfortable and secure income, and that the lack of a wife affected their mental health. >

Rubinstein married in 1917.

http://rubina.yfw24.de/

<When the Nazis invaded Belgium and proceeded with their revolting genocide, they came across Rubinstein. He was so far gone that they didn't even bother sending him to a camp.>

I have read this, but it makes no sense to me. Didn't the Nazis exterminate the mentally ill as well as Jews?

Feb-23-09  Ulhumbrus: <keypusher:...

<When the Nazis invaded Belgium and proceeded with their revolting genocide, they came across Rubinstein. He was so far gone that they didn't even bother sending him to a camp.>

I have read this, but it makes no sense to me. Didn't the Nazis exterminate the mentally ill as well as Jews?> Perhaps a bureaucrat who liked his chess managed to misplace his file.

Feb-23-09  laskereshevsky: Maybe a Jewis with mentally ill problems was to much for the Nazis......

In any case is not the first case of a Jewis who had saved the life during WWII thanks to same artistic talent.

How many Cellist, Pianist, Writers, Singers, Actors and so so finded in same Nazis with the "weakness" of be an arts adept, a pass to escaped from the dead...

Mar-17-09  WhiteRook48: guess he never expected the queen trade
Jun-12-09  Bridgeburner: There was absolutely nothing wrong with <15...Qxf4>. It's probably the best move Rubinstein could have played.

However, some of his follow-up moves are more problematic. Let's look at the position after <16.Ne4>:


click for larger view

The seemingly obvious capture of the White pawn on c5 with the Knight may have been the start of Rubinstein's problems in this game. He may have desired to retain his bishop pair, but it leads directly to the weakening of the Black king side.

If <16...Bxc5> (instead of <16...Nxc5> as actually played) we would have the following position:


click for larger view

If now <17.Nxc5> then <17...Nxc5> prevents the uncovered attack starting with <18.Bd3> which in the actual game had gained a tempo to compromise Black's King side. The only way for White to recover the pawn in this position is to immediately play <17.Bxe6>, and after <17...Rxe6 18.Nxc5 Nxc5 19.Qxc5> and Black regains the extra pawn by picking off the a pawn with <19...Qxa4>:


click for larger view

This may not be enough to win, as Black needs to complete his development, but he's in no danger whatsoever.

Even in spite of all this, Rubinstein's move wasn't objectively bad, but I suspect that Alekhine gained psychological supremacy here by taking the initiative. Their last game together in Hastings in which Rubinstein lost a won game may have wrecked his confidence and played on his mind in this position because he again runs his position down with poor moves.

<whiteshark> pointed out that <After <19... Kf8=> there is no win for white.> Playing <19Kh8> leaves the Black King exposed and the <f7> square undefended, ultimately allowing Alekhine to set up the combination that leads to Rubinstein's downfall. If <19Kh8> is not the losing move, then its awfully close to it, and <23Qb8> instead of <23Qd6> simply lead to an instant demise.

Mar-27-12  myusernameis: to Bridgeburner's comment:

"with <19...Qxa4>:

click for larger view

This may not be enough to win, as Black needs to complete his development, but he's in no danger whatsoever."

what about Qxc8?

Sep-03-12  vinidivici: whats the continuation after 25...fxg6?
Sep-03-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sastre: If 25...fxg6, 26.Qg2 Kg8 27.Qh3 Bd6 28.Qh7+ Kf8 29.Qh8+ Ke7 30.Qxg7+ Ke8 31.Qg8+ Bf8 32.Qxg6+ Ke7 33.Qxe6#.
Mar-11-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Naniwazu: Or 25...fxg6 26. Qe4 Bxb4 27. Qh4+ Kg8 28. Qh7+ Kf8 29. Qh8+ Ke7 30. Qxg7+ Ke8 31. Qg8+ Bf8 32. Qxg6+ Ke7 33. Qxe6#
Jun-19-13  Karpova: A case of plagiarism of the game annotations from 'On My Great Predecessors' was exposed: http://streathambrixtonchess.blogsp...
Dec-28-14  SpiritedReposte: Black seemed to be doing fine then alekhine pulls a rabbit out of the hat.

Hard to see where black even went wrong or where the critical moves were.

And <Richard Taylor> plays as well as world champion alekhine does...in blitz.

LOL that's just delusional I'm sorry. You must be rated 2800 or something?

This guy took out Capablanca...

Dec-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Well, now you mention it, my rating is really higher than 2800 but I keep it more or less under wraps. My false rating is 1800 or so...

But re this game Rubinstein played uncharacteristically badly about move 15.

I think most of us on CG.com would have wrapped things up much as Alekhine did here. I am more impressed with Alekhine's overall play rather than specific "combinations". He, like Kasparov, was a deeper player than this more or less "Coffee House" example seems to show.

I played through all of the books by Alekhine and one by Alexander covering all his games. Of course they are great games but often more for the "positional" insight of Alekhine. The tactical stuff any GM of any time could pull of.

These are sometimes very brilliant but I don't think that anything is more wonderful than Rubinstein's famous win over Rotlewi.

Dec-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I think to "see" combinations like this is possible for relatively weak club players in blitz as then one goes by intuition. It is often speculative, just going down some lines.

The difference is that for every combo I could play Alekhine played thousands and many blindfold.

So, the point is not to over venerate these guys but to study tactics and see if one can play something similar: which is how we learn, by imitating.

Paradoxically I might well miss such an attack in a slower game. In fact I would do so in most games. Point is that for a player of A's level, this is not so extraordinary, nor is it out of reach of us of the lower orders...

I didn't mean to imply I was a chess genius! I am far from that, I struggle to work moves out like most of my fellow woodpushers...Now and then, that is rarely, I pull off a nice one. But of course (in those scarce instances) I also need a lot of luck, as I often miss the defensive moves etc.

There never seems enough time to calculate these combos. There is one really complex one by Alekhine that defeated me completely. I spent about 2 to 3 hours trying to calculate it.

But some tactics are generic. And Alekhine, commenting on one of his games, revealed that he himself had made an extensive study of combination types, as he pointed out one (type) he had not seen before...I forget which game of even book it was. But it seemed so. I am also sure that he and Capa etc extensively studied endgames as well as openings of course.

Dec-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: In fact, I've frequently been the devastated victim of attacks like this by 1600 (or near that) players on FICS. Of course we have all learnt from Alek and Rubinstein etc
Jul-25-16  andrea volponi: 16...h6-Ad3=. 18...Ae7!
Apr-25-17  tijnpeterz: Kf6 is loosing too, tried all variations, please give me yours "whiteshark". thanks in advance
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