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Jose Raul Capablanca vs Alexander Alekhine
"Cambridge Springs Eternal" (game of the day Nov-20-2016)
Capablanca - Alekhine World Championship Match (1927), Buenos Aires ARG, rd 7, Sep-30
Queen's Gambit Declined: Cambridge Springs Variation (D52)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-20-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <morfishine: Alex didn't play very well here. I think he was still a drunk at this time. No matter, he won the match... *****>

If you play through the match it was not so easy for Alekhine who would not have won if drunk or boozing. He spent a lot of time analysing Capablanca's games. The games are double edged in many with losses and wins to both sides. It is significant that Alekhine avoided a match with Capablanca after this match and chose relatively weaker opposition. Then he played games in Nazi Germany during the war and, it was alleged, wrote anti-Semitic propaganda to save his skin.

Nov-21-16  Straclonoor: <Then he played games in Nazi Germany during the war> As well as Keres, Junge, BogoLjubow etc.
Nov-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <morf: (Alekhine) didn't play very well here. I think he was still a drunk at this time....>

It is by no means clear that Alekhine's troubles with the bottle surfaced until approximately the time of his first match with Euwe, which was eight years later; even then, while the great man very clearly had a problem with alcohol, some of the stories which have long been cited have come to be regarded as apocryphal. <Mrs Alekhine> might well be able to shed some light--her memory is pretty dang good for an old coot! (laughs)

According to Kotov's biography, Alekhine had some teeth extracted during this phase of the match, though I must state that I have never seen a reference to this anywhere else.

Nov-21-16  beatgiant: <perfidious>
Many sources claim Alekhine had seven teeth extracted during the match, but I'm not sure what's the original source.
Nov-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <Straclonoor: <Then he played games in Nazi Germany during the war> As well as Keres, Junge, BogoLjubow etc.>

Possibly (I know Bogoljubov did) but it doesn't alter the fact. I doubt Keres did, as he was in the USSR. It was much in dispute re these anti-Semitic articles. Many chess players didn't want to have anything to do with Alekhine. He was very arrogant, a White Russian, and he picked his opponents. He knew that Bogoljubov would fold in time pressure, but in the first match I think it was Bogo had mostly better positions and Alekhine played some basically coffee house chess to unnerve him. Capablanca, until the match, had not lost a game for 7 years and was probably not psychologically prepared as Pachman says in his book of International tournaments. Alekhine thus joins Fischer in the list of anti-Semites who backed the "allies". Fischer, if you care about 9/11, thought 9/11 was wonderful. He then spat on a US document forbidding him to play in Jugoslavia which was technically at war.

So Alekhine and Fischer declined (and avoided strong opposition) as time went on. Fischer and Tal are "great" but only won one World Championship! In fact Botvinnik was very impressive in the return match where he beat Tal convincingly. Tal expressed admiration for his play.

Botvinik did agree to a match, so I suppose in some ways it is a pity it didn't happen but Alekhine, after some days of debauching and boozing, lost his mind, and threw him self from a seedy hotel in Lisbon. As his body landed on the road a passing Portuguese who knew he was a bastard spat on the body to express contempt...

So are the mighty fallen indeed!

Nov-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <beatgiant: <perfidious> Many sources claim Alekhine had seven teeth extracted during the match, but I'm not sure what's the original source.>

He was drunk, he had toothache, he won, but when he lost to Euwe, out came a long list of these pathetic excuses. Euwe beat him well. If he was so scared of getting beaten he had to booze he was a pathetic being indeed, as well, as it seems, as being a Nazi supporter.

Nov-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Many sources claim Alekhine had seven teeth extracted during the match, but I'm not sure what's the original source.>

At least one (!) link/source about <teeth extraction in 1935> would be helpful, to start with.

Any Dutch dagblad/nieuws sources?

Nov-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <At least one (!) link/source about <teeth extraction in 1935> would be helpful, to start with.>

I believe the 1927 match is indicated, to which end I refer you: Capablanca - Alekhine World Championship Match (1927)

Nov-21-16  Straclonoor: <I doubt Keres did, as he was in the USSR.> Here is the game between Alekhine and Keres in Munich in 1942 - Alekhine vs Keres, 1942 They played also in Zatsburg and in Prague in 1942-43
Nov-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Yes, Keres was in the USSR, but so were the Germans.

Lissowski's article <Keres Plays With the Wehrmacht> (http://www.chessarch.com/archive/00...) was the inspiration for my game collection title: Game Collection: Capablanca plays the world....(I)

Nov-21-16  beatgiant: <all>
The discussion is getting off topic for this specific game. How about taking general discussions about Alekhine to the Alexander Alekhine player page?

Then we can return here to discuss <RandomVisitor>'s very interesting improvement with <12...b6> above.

Nov-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <beatgiant: <all> > I second that!

And for Alekhine's <dental treatment> I 'd suggest to relocate/shift/pass it on to Alekhine - Euwe World Championship Match (1935)

Nov-21-16  beatgiant: <whiteshark>
Thanks. To clarify, the dental incident relates to the Capablanca - Alekhine World Championship Match (1927).
Nov-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <beatgiant>

Oops, not for the 1st time I (falsely) assumed s.th., here that Al. was drunk due to his racking toothaches. ;)

TY <beatgiant>!

Mar-22-17  nummerzwei: After the 'automatic' 16...b6 Black can put up stiff resistance.
Jun-28-17  paavoh: @Richard Taylor: Nazi Germany occupied Estonia in 1941, so Keres was not located in Soviet Union.

Indeed, Wikipedia on Keres says this:

"With the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union on June 22, 1941, Estonia came under German control soon afterwards. During 1942 and 1943, Keres and Alekhine both played in four tournaments organized by Ehrhardt Post, a President of Nazi Grossdeutscher Schachbund. Alekhine won at the Salzburg 1942 chess tournament (Six Grandmasters' Tournament) in June 1942, at Munich (European Individual Chess Championship) in September 1942, and at Prague (International Tournament) in April 1943, always ahead of Keres, who placed second in all three of those tournaments. They tied for first at Salzburg (Six Grandmasters' Tournament) in June 1943, with 7/10."

Jun-29-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <paavoh: @Richard Taylor: Nazi Germany occupied Estonia in 1941, so Keres was not located in Soviet Union. Indeed, Wikipedia on Keres says this:

"With the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union on June 22, 1941, Estonia came under German control soon afterwards. During 1942 and 1943, Keres and Alekhine both played in four tournaments organized by Ehrhardt Post, a President of Nazi Grossdeutscher Schachbund. Alekhine won at the Salzburg 1942 chess tournament (Six Grandmasters' Tournament) in June 1942, at Munich (European Individual Chess Championship) in September 1942, and at Prague (International Tournament) in April 1943, always ahead of Keres, who placed second in all three of those tournaments. They tied for first at Salzburg (Six Grandmasters' Tournament) in June 1943, with 7/10.">

Keres though was never considered to be a collaborator as Alekhine was. His basic honesty was never in doubt despite these vicissitudes of border changes. Pachman was able to watch Alekhine play during the war but he isn't under a cloud. Alekhine though was or is (under a cloud, but there was no trial or anything so it is still not a certainty what his real situation was).

But after the war it seemed that eventually Botvinnik was ready to play him (it had been arranged) despite the controversy. But he fell drunk and raving from a hotel window to his death and so they played the 1948 World Championships.

When I peer into the photographs of Alekhine I am sure I see the face of evil but this might be an illusion created...

We have to also consider the old saw:

'The first casualty of war is truth.'

Jun-29-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <Richard Taylor> There is no face of evil. Alekhine was a good fellow who soldiered on despite huge adversity. He lost his fortune not once, but twice: during WWI, then during WWII

*****

Jun-29-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: Does losing your fortune make you a good person?

Alekhine wasn't a fiend, but he does seem to have been quite a Machiavellian character, and his career is still under a cloud over his Nazi collaboration.

Jun-30-17  aliejin: "Does losing your fortune make you a good person?" A stupid question of course

Lose fortune, exile, and overcome
It speaks of great merit.
Being a Nazi collaborator is a bad thing since
Current standards. Judge the behaviors
Of the past with the current standards
Is an anachronism. Another error, in which it falls Over and over again on this site

Being a Nazi at that time, among other things, meant opposing To the "communist red tide" ... something welcome By vast sectors.

There were millions and millions
Of people who honestly
They understood Nazism as a behavior
Correct. Surely (maybe not ...)
Understood their mistake with the passage of time ....

Jun-30-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: <aliejin>: <"Does losing your fortune make you a good person?" A stupid question of course

Lose fortune, exile, and overcome
It speaks of great merit.>

You're confusing ethics with perseverance. You're also confusing losing the fortune with perseverance. I think we can agree that perseverance is a positive trait, but that really wasn't the question.

Jul-01-17  aliejin: Alekhine went ahead playing chess, did not commit illicit. Until the fide organized the fight for the title, Everybody did what they wanted
with its title, situation that was not something abnormal for the time.
That Alekhine was something like the "demon
Of tazmania" is only Jewish advertising.
Jul-19-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: Capablanca has this almost psychic way of deceiving his opponents, of leading them astray. The positions he creates have a delusion to them. It always looks like Capablanca is losing, always looks like he is worse, but then he wins, and you scratch your head. The deception is unreal, but very very real at the same time.
Jul-19-17  sudoplatov: Speaking of losing fortunes, one should consider the fate Ossip Bernstein.
Jul-19-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: Yes, Bernstein was virtuous too.
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