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Jose Raul Capablanca vs Alexander Alekhine
Capablanca - Alekhine World Championship Match (1927), Buenos Aires ARG, rd 27, Nov-09
Queen's Gambit Declined: Orthodox Defense. Henneberger Variation (D63)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-02-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: One of those pawns is doubled, or do you say 'two are'?! The other is blocked, White's rook is a little misplaced, his king is quite bare with the queens on etc. White is better, naturally, but it would not have been the most effective way.
Jul-02-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: In this position, the doubled pawns can advance, so its a non-factor. And it is Black's King that is subject to attack.

To take your line:

36.Rexg6 Rxg6 37.Qxg6+ Kh8 38.Rh4 Rf6 and then 39.Qg5 Kh7 40.Rh5 Rg6 41.Qh4 Re6 42.Qg4 etc White gradually increases his advantage and eventually either the pieces are exchanged into a winning ending or the attack will succeed.

Jul-02-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: Yes, it is probably winning, but instead of having to slowly work your queen and rook out of those awkward positions on the g- and h-files in that way, and THEN start the real winning process, which also takes time, clearer is the forcing line as in the game and then 38.Ke2! Qxb2+ 39.Kf3 Qc3+ 40.Kg4 Kh8 41.Kh4 Rxg6 42.Rxg6 Qc5 43.Rxh6+ Kg8 44.Qg6+ Kf8 45.Rh8+ because this is already a lethal attack.
Jul-02-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: Lethal? Where is the mate? In real life, after 36.Rexg6 Alekhine resigns because he is two pawns down with no counterplay against Capablanca.
Jul-02-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: <Lethal? Where is the mate?> Mate or very large material advantage occurs after 45..Ke7 46.Rb8, with many lines depending on how Black prefers to lose.

<after 36.Rexg6 Alekhine resigns because he is two pawns down with no counterplay against Capablanca.> Maybe he would, it's kinda hard to tell.

Sep-08-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I think Kasparov reckoned that 36.b4 might be the best move. But Capablanca would never have played that because he didn't notice that the c5p had been attacked.
Sep-13-06  capanegra: Round 27, and the score is 4:2 on Alekhine's favor.

"This game was crucial for me" wrote later the afflicted Capablanca. In my opinion, until 38.Kf2?? he played his best game of the match, and it must have been very traumatic to throw such a precious, elaborated an deserved victory. But it is also true that two rounds later Alekhine returned the gesture in a drawn position (Capablanca vs Alekhine, 1927). So, could the course of the match have changed had Capa won this game? It is impossible to say accurately, but probably not.

Oct-06-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <panandh: What is wrong with the idea of hiding behind g2/g3 pawns with 39Kg1 followed with 40Kh2? <Green Bishop: 39.kg1, Qd1+ 40.Kh2,Qh5+ and black wins.>>

(VAR) Position after 39 ♔f2-g1 ♕d2-d1+ 40 ♔g1-h2?? ♕d1-h5+ <double attack>:


click for larger view

And as Dr. Nunn would say, <LOOSE PIECES DROP OFF>: the <LOOSE> White g6-rook (two attackers, two defenders) <DROPS OFF> to the tactic <DOUBLE ATTACK WITH CHECK>. The Black h5-queen <CHECKS> the White h2-king and simultaneously puts <EN PRISE> the White g6-rook. White must get out of <CHECK>, thus dropping a whole rook.

Oct-06-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <Green Bishop: Capa missed a win with 38. Kf2. The correct move was 38. Ke2, avoiding perpetual check.>

What a tragedy for Capablanca!

Position after 37 ... ♕c5-c1+


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Now 38 ♔f1-e2! wins since White can escape from <PERPETUAL CHECK>.

(VAR) Position after winning 38 ♔f1-e2!


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But instead poor Capablanca actually blundered terribly here and played 38 ♔f1-f2??, after which his king cannot escape from the <CHECKS> of the Black queen.

Position after drawing 38 ♔f1-f2?? :


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Chess can be such a cruel game. Here Capablanca -totally- outplays Alekhine but then he makes one mistake (38 ♔f1-f2??) and he is deprived of his much-deserved victory.

Oct-06-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <crafty: 38. Ke2 Qxb2+ 39. Kf3 Qc3+ 40. Kg4 Kh8 41. Rxg8+ (eval 2.14; depth 13 ply; 500M nodes)>


click for larger view


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The win that Capablanca missed, with the White king successfully escaping <PERPETUAL CHECK> by fleeing to g4.

Oct-06-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <offramp: I think Kasparov reckoned that 36.b4 might be the best move. But Capablanca would never have played that because he didn't notice that the c5p had been attacked.>

Position after 35 ... ♕g7-f8:


click for larger view

<offramp> How do you know that Capablanca missed the obvious threat of 36 ... ♕f8xc5 ?

And yes, Kasparov's <PROPHYLACTIC> 36 b2-b4!? looks very good here since it prevents the only threat that Black has here in the position, not to the White c5-pawn but rather of breaking into the White position with his queen and going for a <PERPETUAL> against the very exposed White king.

(VAR) Position after Kasparov's 36 b2-b4!?:


click for larger view

Oct-07-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Damn, what a disaster for Capablanca.
Oct-07-07  euripides: If <38.Ke2 Qxb2+ 39.Kf3> Qb3+ how does the king escape ? e.g. 40.Kg4 Qd1+ and if 41.Kh4 then ...Qh1+ or if 41.Kh3 then...Qh5 mate.
Oct-07-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <euripides: If <38.Ke2 Qxb2+ 39.Kf3> Qb3+ how does the king escape ?>

I think that then the winning move is 40 ♔f3-f2!:


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Putting the White king on the dark square f2 makes it more difficult for the Black queen on the light square b3 to give check.

That's a generality. Here the concrete point is that now the Black queen has only three checks, on b2, a2, and b6, but from neither square can she reach the critical d1-square.

My idea is that then the White king -can- escape to shelter on the h-file because then Black will not have the ... ♕d1-h5+ maneuver at his disposal.

For example, 40 ♔f3-f2! ♕b3-b2+ 41 ♔f2-g1 ♕b2-c1+ 42 ♔g1-h2


click for larger view

and there are no more checks, or 40 ♔f3-f2! ♕b3-b6+ 41 ♔f2-f1!


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and there are no more checks(!) because the White a4-pawn covers b5 and the White e4-queen covers b1!

So I think 39 ... ♕b2-b3+ loses to 40 ♔f3-f2! but you'll have to verify this with a comp. This is solely my analysis so there may be holes in it.

Again, the main idea is to seek shelter on h2 when Black is unable to play ... ♕d1-h5+ and I think I have shown how to do that.

Oct-10-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: Interesting discussion, long analysis proves Capa's instincts with 30 Nxd7 were correct, but was he letting Alekhine off the hook by cashing in right away?

Investigating on move 30 then, Shredder found the "creeping move" 30 Qd3! paralyses Black


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if 30...Bc8 31 Qd6 walking right into Black's position.


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if 31...Re8 32 Nxf7!

and if 31...Qf8 there is the equally startling 32 Ng4 Kg7 33 Nf6! leaving Black movebound.

Oct-15-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <tamar: ... Investigating on move 30 then, Shredder found the "creeping move" 30 Qd3! paralyses Black ...

if 30...Bc8 31 Qd6 walking right into Black's position...

and if 31...Qf8 there is the equally startling 32 Ng4 Kg7 33 Nf6! leaving Black movebound. >

(VAR) Position after 30 ♕c2-d3! ♗d7-c8 31 ♕d3-d6 ♕g7-f8 32 ♘e5-g4 ♔g8-g7 33 ♘g4-f6!:


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And the White f6-knight is taboo on account of the <SNAP MATE> 33 ... ♔g7x♘f6?? 34 ♕d6-e5#


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<tamar> Nice find, that 30 ♕c2-d3!, one of those Spassky "creeping queen moves". Now two questions:

1) What is the Shredder eval of Capabanca's 30 ♘e5x♗d7 ?

2) What is the Shredder eval of the superior 30 ♕c2-d3! ?

3) What is the Shredder eval of the position after 33 ♘g4-f6! ?

Thanks

Mar-04-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Knight13: 22. Bb!? Oh, that's a tiny little big move.
Mar-31-08  crwynn: This must have deeply shaken Capablanca's confidence, I think that this as much as the blown half-point is why Alekhine considered it so crucial. Capablanca had been getting little or nothing with White in game after game, but with his previous White he had really pressed, and now he just plain stomped his opponent - had he pulled out the victory the momentum of the match might have changed a great deal.
Apr-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: 39 ?


click for larger view

<panandh: What is wrong with the idea of hiding behind g2/g3 pawns with 39Kg1 followed with 40Kh2? <Green Bishop: 39.kg1, Qd1+ 40.Kh2,Qh5+ and black wins.>>

(VAR) 40 ♔g1-h2?? ♕d1-h5+ <double attack: g6,h2>


click for larger view

And the 2-2 <LOOSE> White g6-rook goes back into the box.

Sep-03-09  WhiteRook48: kf2??? =
Dec-02-13  Owl: Capablanca misses a win with 38. Ke2
Dec-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: <Owl: Capablanca misses a win with 38. Ke2>

You have an uncanny ability of reading the posts above yours and repeating them back.

Nov-27-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: I haven't read any comments to this game yet. I will after I post. But just looking at the position after move 28 I think Kasparov is right - White is winning!

If this were 1921 and JRC was playing Lasker, Capa would have dealt a death blow and won this game in under 40 moves.

Sep-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <notyetagm: <offramp: I think Kasparov reckoned that 36.b4 might be the best move. But Capablanca would never have played that because he didn't notice that the c5♙ had been attacked.> Position after 35 ... ♕g7-f8:

click for larger view
<offramp> How do you know that Capablanca missed the obvious threat of 36 ... ♕f8xc5 ?>

I believe I read this in Alekhine's <200 Parties D'Echecs>. Alekhine wrote that white had missed the move Qxc5. If someone has the book he or she might be able to verify it.

Sep-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Probably Alekhine's worst game of the match (even though he didn't lose), marked by its uninspired sloppiness; but no biggie, some game had to have that distinction and he won the match anyways
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