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Efim Bogoljubov vs Alexander Alekhine
"Mind Bogoling" (game of the day Apr-26-2015)
Alekhine - Bogoljubov World Championship Match (1929), The Hague NED, rd 18, Oct-26
French Defense: Classical. Burn Variation Morozevich Line (C11)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 7 times; par: 103 [what's this?]

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sac: 37.Rxc7+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-24-09  waustad: I don't usually see Friday puzzles so fast, if at all.
Jul-24-09  fporretto: Would someone please help me cook 37. Nc5+?
It appears to win substantial material in all
variations:

37. Nc5+ Kb8
38. Qxd8+ Bxd8
39. Nd7+

37. Nc5+ Ka7 or Ka8
38. Qa4+ Kb8
39. Na6+ Kb7 or Ka7 or Kc8
40. Rxc7+

37. Nc5+ Ka7 or Ka8
38. Qa4+ Kb8
39. Na6+ Ka8
40. Nxc7++

What have I missed?

Jul-24-09  Patriot: <fporretto: Would someone please help me cook 37. Nc5+? It appears to win substantial material in all
variations: ...What have I missed?
>

You missed 37...Qxc5! I looked at this first since white's queen is also hanging. See my previous post variation "B".

Jul-24-09  butilikefur: Hey <David2009>

After <37. Qxe6 Bxh2 38. Nc5+ Ka7 39. Qe7+ Ka8 40. Nd7 Rxd7 41. Qxd7 Qxd4 42. Rc8+ Bb8 43. Qc6+ Ka7> White should still have a won endgame.

<44. Qc5+ Qxc5 45. Rxc5 g3> 45...d4 46. Rd5 d3 47. Rxd3 g3 48. Rd7+ Kb6 49. Kc2 Kc5 50. Kd3

<46. Rxd5 Bf4 47. Rd4 Be5 48. Rg4 Kb6 49. Kc2>

Jul-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  OBIT: OK, looking at this, I'll be real surprised if the first move is not 37. Qxe6. Then if 37...Qxe6 38. Nc5+ Kb6 39. Nxe6 Rd7 40. Nxc7 Rxc7 41. Rxc7 Kxc7 is an easily won K+P endgame. So, Black must have something better than 37...Qxe6, except, um, 37...Qxd4 38. Qc6+ wins the bishop with check, and every other Black move just looks clearly better for White.

Seems too easy for a "difficult" puzzle. Looking at the answer should be enlightening - can't wait to see what I missed.

Jul-24-09  Coigach: This seemed to me the most straightforward combination this week. There is a fairly narrow range of options, unlike Monday, and no tricky sting in the tail, such as on Wednesday. It just requires seeing that winning a pawn while liquidating to a pawn ending leaves a straightforward win.
Jul-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  dzechiel: <MohdSalah: Sorry I found this puzzle is silly not because it's easy or not but because that player did all that just to win a pawn!>

I think you fail to see the big picture here. Bogo played the combination because it was the clearest and easiest way to win the game, it just happened to be that this was accomplished by winning a single pawn.

Jul-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: <OBIT: OK, looking at this, I'll be real surprised if the first move is not 37. Qxe6. Then if 37...Qxe6 38. Nc5+ Kb6 39. Nxe6 Rd7 40. Nxc7 Rxc7 41. Rxc7 Kxc7 is an easily won K+P endgame. >

Interesting, but not as forcing. Instead of 37...Qxe6, black might opt to create a passed pawn threat with 37...Bxh2. I'm not sure that the win is so clear for white then.

Jul-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  OBIT: <YouRang>Yeh, I've been looking at this. David2009 suggests 37...Bxh2 after 37. Qe6, and after 38. Nc5+ Ka7 I'd play 39. Qxg4 before trying to penetrate with the rook and queen. Black has a very hard position to defend, IMO. Having said that, the line played in the game reaches the K+P ending by force, so there is nothing else to consider - point taken.
Jul-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: <dzechiel><Bogo played the combination because it was the clearest and easiest way to win the game, it just happened to be that this was accomplished by winning a single pawn.>

Right. Lots of games are won by recognizing when and how to simplify to a winning endgame. This is a good example of Bogo doing just that.

Jul-24-09  lzromeu: The easiest of the week until now.
What could white will do?
Jul-24-09  WhiteRook48: first I thought of 37 Rxc7+ but couldn't see the follow-up stupid blindness
Jul-24-09  orior: It really is easy, I'm drunk and I found the solution within half a minute and couldn't believe this is really the solution, unlike some medium puzzles which take me longer when I'm sober.
Jul-24-09  vulcan20: Aw man, I forgot that after 37. Rxc7+ Qxc7 38. Nc5+, the black queen is pinned and ...Qxc5 is impossible!
Jan-01-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Game Collection: Knight changes color with tempo (gain of time) 38 Nd3-c5+ becomes dark-squared for fork of the d8-,c7-squares
Jan-01-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: 37 ?


click for larger view

Aug-08-11  Garech: It's amusing that this game is given the title "Morozevich Line" despite being played well over forty years before Morozevich was born! Fantastic game from Bogojubov in any case.

-Garech

Apr-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Pretty mind boggling game I guess, but this pun would probably be better if it were a Bogo-Indian.
Apr-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: The two matches between Alekhine and Bogolyubov are usually dismissed as poor substitutes for a rematch with Capablanca. And it's true that Alekhine won both easily, against a player player past his peak.

But that's not to say that a great tactician like bobolyubov didn't have his mays. Many of the games, particularly in this match, are well-contested and very interesting.

Apr-26-15  RookFile: The interesting part is good. Pillsbury was the same way, you can pick a game of his at random - win, lose, or draw, and find it was always interesting.
Apr-26-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <Phony Benoni> is absolutely correct
Apr-26-15  ToTheDeath: ...b5? was really asking for it, ensuring the Black king would never have safe haven in any part of the board. Bogo was not at Alekhine's level but he was a good attacking player and if you gave him a target he would go after it with gusto.
Apr-26-15  newhampshireboy: In this game, Bogo makes me smile!
Apr-28-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The A pawn will act as a outside passed pawn and will allow white to queen the d-pawn.
Dec-07-16  Saniyat24: What an extra ordinary game....! Alekhine long castling on his 25th move...Bogoljubov's expert Queen moves to attack from both sides...this game is a gem..!
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