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Alexander Alekhine vs Geza Maroczy
Bled (1931), Bled YUG, rd 24, Sep-24
Queen's Gambit Declined: Traditional Variation (D30)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 55 times; par: 35 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <TheaN: ... 24.f6+ ... Nxf6... After Qf8+ Kd8, white is dead>

I think that's incorrect: 25.Qf8+(?) (inferior, but still easily winning) Kd8! 26.Nxf6 wins - 26...Qxa4 27.Nxe8 Qxe8 28.Rc8+ Kxc8 29.Qxe8+ Kc7 30.Rxf7+ Kb6 31.Qe7 (Black's rook checks come to nothing), or 26...Qd4+ 27.Kh1 Qxf6 28.Rxf6 Rd1+ 29.Rff1!

Jul-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Alekhine's career in his first time as world champion is very odd. He won the title in 1927. His next serious chess comes in 1929, the defence against Bogoljuboff. He then plays two major tournaments in 1931 & 1934, winning them "by miles". Then in 1935 he loses the title to Euwe.

Meteoric!

Jul-24-13  SimonWebbsTiger: @<offramp>

You need to remember Alekhine hit the bottle. Sobering up was part of his prep for the re-match versus Euwe!

Jul-24-13  KlingonBorgTatar: Alekhine is Alekhine Is Alekhine. I can't help but observe that Black has a robust centralized position, conducive for attack and defense yet Alekhine manages to see minute cracks and forces in one of his famous combos. Alekhine himself indicated his desire to play in fortissimo style and that probably is the reason for the b4 pawn stab. This is a game where a deep centralization strategy seemed to be bowl over by brutal dynamic tactics.
Jul-24-13  TheaN: <FSR> have to admit I felt discouraged by the queen checks and threats to backrannk mate, but I guess the immediate threat of Qxe8# stop black in his tracks, hadn't analyzed as far as Qxf6 with Rd1 and Rff1, but that would indeed close it up.

White could have been long gone drinking a beer at the bar, though. But I guess that point was made already haha.

Jul-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <28.f6+> pushes Black off the cliff:

(1) 28.f6+ Kd8 29.Qxe8+ Kxe8 30.Rc8#

(1a) 28...Nxf6 29.Qxf6+ Kd7 30.Nf8#

**********
PM: A famous game with an overlooked hidden resource for Black. Nunn expounds on analysis by Vukovic and concludes Black improves with <27...Rc6>; so much so that after 28.Rxc6 bxc6 29.fxe6 fxe6 30.Nf6 Bf7 31.Nxd7 Rxd7 32.Bg6 Qc5+ 33.Kh1 Qf2 34.Qa1 Qxf1+ 35.Qxf1 Bxg6 White's advantage has shrunk to the point that a draw is likely:


click for larger view

**********

Jul-24-13  GauraNitai: I must confess I have seen this game before, but then again once you see f6 the game's up. But the difficult part lies in bringing your opponent to the position where you can play f6, which is what differentiates masters from mediocres.
Jul-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <GauraNitai: ....once you see f6 the game's up. But the difficult part lies in bringing your opponent to the position where you can play f6, which is what differentiates masters from mediocres.>

This can even be the case when it comes to top players: Spielmann once noted that he could see combinations as capably as Alekhine, but had difficulty bringing about the same positions.

Jul-24-13  zb2cr: Very clever! 28. f6+, and now two lines:

A. 28. ... Kd8; 29. Qxe8+, Kxe8; 30. Rc8#.

B. 28. ... Nxf6; 29. Qxf6+, Kd7; 30. Nf8#.

Jul-24-13  Chessman1504: Nice!
Jul-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  lost in space: a: 28.f6+ Kd8 29.Qxe8+ Kxe8 30.Rc8#

b: 28...Nxf6 29.Qxf6+ Kd7 30.Nf8#

and thats it

Jul-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Pretty easy, the pivot point is f6;mate will follow.
Jul-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Hop over harangue king elevate a mind for inclusive one eh supplicate rooks indeed c1 f1 in every blowbind accord bid afraid to say pawn fled seals the deal as king trapped I st er e8 etc up rouse knights slumber the h8 cue haggling over it now in queen about turn a bit damp squab quavers evermore bus having a staple advantage off re co-flight 28.f6+ in baggage off loaded jettison f5 low f6+ pawn efface la language 28.f6+ inceed ah good dutiful bonafide cuffed look having.
Jul-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Milkfeed 28...nxf6 29.Qxf6+ and hoofed am separated 29...kd7 30.Nf8 the chaff from the wheat bane dilemmas spring book took alives aline seek an destroy 27...Rxd3 on key or i seed a would giving lade the trees on dipper 26.Qe5 Nd5 anchor amdearth am herding 27...rc6 flood gate rook c1 stiff rag oiled engine seek line monster f5 bend f6 cognizant path herded offin capital gainssecuredback tock now ledge no offering 28...kd8 29.qxe8+ bullseye fanciful king heading curious again link eg highgauge 29...Kxe8 30.rc8#.
Jul-24-13  BOSTER: I remember how Karpov complained that he had given Kasparov "hundreds of hours" of free lessons in their first match.

I'm not sure about <free>, but not doubt that Kasparov had learned a lot in match 1984.

What I want to say is: if <CG> gives Alekhine's games very often, and you play the games (not only <puzzle>) as his opponent you can learn a lot.

Jul-24-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Abdel Irada: Today's theme: Monday Deferred.

The first move is an unremarkable pawn check. But if Black plays 28. ...Kd8 rather than take the pawn, *then* he gets the Monday treatment with 29. Qxe8!

I wonder how many mid- to late-week puzzles might be described as "Monday* puzzles, seen from one or more moves earlier." ;-)

*I am not, of course, suggesting that most of the puzzles actually involve queen sacs. I speak here only of the ones that do.

Jul-24-13  Alex56171: 28.f6+ does it!
If 28... Kd8 29.Qxe8+ Kxe8 30.Rc8#
If 28... Nxf6 29.Qxf6+ Kd7 30.Nf8#
Easy.
Jul-24-13  M.Hassan: <morfishine:PM: A famous game with an overlooked hidden resource for Black. Nunn expounds on analysis by Vukovic and concludes Black improves with <27...Rc6>; so much so that after 28.Rxc6 bxc6 29.fxe6 fxe6 30.Nf6 Bf7 31.Nxd7 Rxd7 32.Bg6 Qc5+ 33.Kh1 Qf2 34.Qa1 Qxf1+ 35.Qxf1 Bxg6 White's advantage has shrunk to the point that a draw is likely:>

Interesting. Thanks for posting it.

Jul-24-13  tivrfoa: the moves before were amazing. =)
i think he started the plan at 23 at least.
Jul-24-13  BlackSheep: Maroczy should have known better , there's no such thing as a "free" bishop against players of Alekhines stature .
Jul-24-13  Nullifidian: 28. ♙f6+ ♔d8 (♘xf6 29. ♕xf6+ ♔d7 30. ♘f8#) 29. ♕xe8+ ♔xe8 30. ♖c8#
Dec-28-13  Artemi: Alekhine breath life to the Chess pieces.....a magnficent player, He saves Capablanca to second disaster because at this time he is in the pinacle of his power!!! No surprise that he is the idol of Gary Kasparov!!1
May-15-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Capacorn: What an awesome game. If we analyze it to death Alekhine's play may not lead to a forced win, but who cares? From a real-world perspective, the attack obviously works beautifully. (Emphasis on the word "beautifully.") It wouldn't hurt me to play an attack of this kind and draw, or even lose, the game. That's the chance one takes -- a worthwhile chance, in my opinion.

The notes in "The Mammoth Book of the World's Greatest Chess Games" read like an attacking (and defensive) manual -- well worth studying and admiring.

May-15-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Capacorn: <perfidious: <GauraNitai: ....once you see f6 the game's up. But the difficult part lies in bringing your opponent to the position where you can play f6, which is what differentiates masters from mediocres.>

This can even be the case when it comes to top players: Spielmann once noted that he could see combinations as capably as Alekhine, but had difficulty bringing about the same positions.>

One of my favorite chess quotes, Perfidious. I think that many of us lesser players can find the combination if presented with the starting position, as in a "white to play and win" problem. The real trick is arranging the pieces to make the combination possible in the first place. The difference between the two can be several hundred rating points. What a pleasure to observe the build-up from the master.

May-18-16  andrea volponi: 23 f5!! . 18...Txd4?(Cbd5!)
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