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Anatoly Karpov vs Lev Alburt
Chess Olympiad (1980), Valletta MLT, rd 11, Dec-02
Alekhine Defense: Modern Variation. Main Line (B05)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-25-16  Howard: Remember the picture in Chess Life, back in early 1981, of Karpov purposely ignoring Alburt's extended hand?
Jun-10-16  Howard: Here's a question that I've pondered for awhile....why weren't Browne, Kavalek, or Robert Byrne on the U.S. team that year ?

There must have been SOME reason---but what ?

May-27-17  Poisonpawns: Interesting comments about Karpov`s dominance at the time in this article.

http://www.nytimes.com/1981/02/08/a...

May-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <ToTheDeath: 18.Qxa5? Qd4+!! with a draw- this was a nice trap Karpov avoided.>

Indeed. Two moves later, though, capturing the a5 is kosher. 16...a5 looks reckless.

May-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <offramp: Rather unsportingly Karpov refused to shake Alburt's hand before this game....>

Unsporting, Grandmaster

May-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: If the US intended chiefly to provoke the USSR in the supposed match by letting a 'traitor' play against the reigning World Champion, then the move clearly backfired.
May-30-17  Howard: Granted, it's somewhat of a mystery as to why Alburt was given Board 1 on the team. And it's still a mystery to me, personally, regarding the absence of Browne, Kavalek, and Byrne from the team.

Is it possible that Alburt was given Board 1 as a way of honoring him for coming to the U.S. recently--and the other three aforementioned players sat out the Olympiad in protest?

Any thoughts on this ?

May-30-17  RookFile: Alburt was a strong player. There was nothing wrong with putting him on board 1.
Jun-04-17  Poisonpawns: Alburt was also one the highest rated players on the US team. https://www.olimpbase.org/1980/1980...
Jun-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: Alburt was fearless, against anyone, which sometimes led to some horrible disasters, like the match with Nigel Short, but also led to some memorable games, whether he won or lost. Viz. this one and Alburt vs Kasparov, 1982 in the next Olympiad.

He was also chivalrous, at least in print -- I remember him annotating his loss to Pia Cramling in Chess Life with nothing but the warmest praise for his opponent. That's hard to do! P Cramling vs Alburt, 1984

Jun-05-17  Granny O Doul: Alburt had arrived in the USA only the year previous, and I believe some of the others begrudged him the first board, and perhaps even his spot on the team. His USCF may well have been the highest; he did very well in his early swisses here.

I always found him a bit mysterious, but he certainly always seemed a gentleman.

Jun-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Granny O Doul....I always found (Alburt) a bit mysterious, but he certainly always seemed a gentleman.>

The one time we met, he came across as very much a gentleman.

Jun-05-17  Howard: This may not be the most appropriate place to mention this, but my opinions on Alburt are somewhat biased due to a lot of anti-Soviet crap (in my view) that he wrote in Chess Life during the years when the late Larry Parr was editor.
Jun-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: <a lot of anti-Soviet crap > would that be due to his being a Ukrainian, a country kept under lock and key by the USSR, blocking emigration of Jewish peoples and others who felt they had no rights in the USSR?

Like other Jewish 'refuseniks' Alburt defected when he got the chance. He won or tied first the USA closed championship three times and was Ukrainian champion three times. I'd say he's entitled to an opinion of the USSR.

Jun-05-17  Howard: Perhaps I should be a bit more specific. His anti-Soviet garbage actually was about chess, not about the Soviet Union in general.

For example, during the 1984-85 "Moscow Marathon" WC match, he actually wrote that if Karpov or Kasparov played a match against either Miles or Christiansen under conditions that the match(s) be played in a secluded spot with absolutely NO outside help from anyone, then Miles and Christiansen would probably be the favorites to win.

His "reasoning" was that Karpov and Kasparov were over-dependent on help from their fellow Soviets when it came to opening preparation and adjournment analysis.

Granted, those factors were certainly important back in the day. But, to say that Karpov and Kasparov would be underdogs in such a match...

....bull!

Jun-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: I don't begrudge Alburt his resentment against the USSR. But I never trusted his judgment after those ridiculous statements.
Jun-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Howard: This may not be the most appropriate place to mention this, but my opinions on Alburt are somewhat biased due to a lot of anti-Soviet crap (in my view) that he wrote in Chess Life during the years when the late Larry Parr was editor.>

I agree, he wrote some crazy stuff, and Parr ate it up. But, Alburt seemed like a decent human being, and I liked how he played chess.

Jun-05-17  Strelets: <Howard> That's funny, because Kasparov played a training match against the late Tony Miles in Switzerland shortly before the London/Leningrad return match against Karpov. He won +5 -0 =1 and was described by his opponent as "a kind of monster with 100 eyes" in the May 23, 1986 Basler Zeitung. Source: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...
Jun-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Strelets: <Howard> That's funny, because Kasparov played a training match against the late Tony Miles in Switzerland shortly before the London/Leningrad return match against Karpov. He won +5 -0 =1 and was described by his opponent as "a kind of monster with 100 eyes" in the May 23, 1986 Basler Zeitung. Source: http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/...

Timman, I believe, said something along the lines of Alburt's statement, maybe not quite so extreme, about Karpov (I think it was before Kasparov emerged). I don't agree with that view at all, and I think the Kasparov-Miles match pretty much disposed of it, but Alburt wasn't the only grandmaster who thought that way.

Jun-05-17  Strelets: <keypusher> I'd love to know where people got that idea. After all, it's not as though Karpov hadn't spent the '70s-'80s winning tournaments in the United States, Spain, France, Italy, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Canada, Yugoslavia, West Germany... The amount of sheer garbage that has been written about the man boggles the mind.
Jun-05-17  nok: <Kasparov played a training match against the late Tony Miles> <won +5 -0 =1> Karpov's score was about the same before Miles finally clinched one with the St George.
Jun-09-17  Howard: Another example, by the way, was his comments in CL about the opening in Seirawan's win over Kasparov in 1986. Read what I've posted there.
Jun-10-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Howard: ...Karpov and Kasparov were over-dependent on help from their fellow Soviets when it came to opening preparation and adjournment analysis.

Granted, those factors were certainly important back in the day....>

They were also important at night.

Jun-10-17  Howard: In the case of the Kasparov-Miles match, however, was THAT match played in a remote location in which neither of the players could receive ANY outside help? Seem to vaguely recall that wasn't the case.

And on the subject of "garbage" about Karpov, a prime example was the "Karpov Symposium" that ran in the March or April, 1986 issue of Chess Life. One chess publication (don't recall the name) referred to it as "one of the most embarrassing escapades" ever to appear in a chess magazine, and added that it amounted to nothing more than an "attack on Karpov."

And they were right! That lengthy article had a lot of ridiculous assertions about Karpov, as I recall.

Jan-11-19  carpovius: Poor Lev :)
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