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Thomas Ernst vs Joel Benjamin
Reykjavik (1990), Reykjavik ISL, rd 6, Mar-??
Sicilian Defense: Lasker-Pelikan. Sveshnikov Variation (B33)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 38.Qxh7+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  gofer: The two rook mate is not completely obvious, until you notice it! It was quite easy to get side-tracked and start looking at Qxe3, Qh5 or Rdxg7...

<38 Qxh7+ Kxh7>
<39 Rgxg7+ ...>

39 ... Kh8 40 Rh7+ Kg8 41 Rdg7#

<39 ... Kh6>
<40 Rg6+ Kh5>
<41 Rh7+ Qh6>
<42 Rhxh6#>

Sep-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Remember: Charybdis is a whirlpool, ready to suck down brave navigators of the choppy Mediterranean sea.
Sep-27-11  SimonWebbsTiger: @<ComboKal>
<I can only assume he was short on the clock>

see my post below.

Sep-27-11  kellmano: <M.Hassan: "Easy" White to play 38.? White has 2 pawns for a Bishop

38.Qxh7+ Kxh7
39.Rgxg7+ Kh8
40.Rh7+ Kg8
41.Rdg7#

OR

39.........Kh6
40.Rh7+ Kg6
41.Rdg7#
>

If you had played the latter line 41......Kxf5 would have come as a surprise.

Sep-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <38.Qxh7+> and white forces mate no matter which way the Black King Runs:

(1) 38...Kxh7 39.R5xg7+ Kh6 40.Rgg6+! [40.Rh7+? and the King escapes the mating net]...Kh5 41.Rh7+ Qh6 42.Rhxh6 mate

Or if the Black King prefers to die on his side of the wall:

(2) 38...Kxh7 39.R5xg7+ Kh8 40.Rh7+ Kg8 41.Rdg8 mate

<sevenseaman> When you wrote: <...Put it back in its place to mould; and the 400 pounds I spent on it in London more than 20 years ago began to pinch me again.>...I about died laughing!

Sep-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Here is another solution: http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/defa... :D
Sep-27-11  sevenseaman: Good to see you post the two lines in a composite manner. In your second line you are lucky you were only visualizing the moves; a chess computer would literally throw your last move <41.Rdg8 mate> out saying, ' Sorry Old man crowded here, cannot accommodate you in such a small hole'!
Sep-27-11  Rachit: <pmukerji: Any thoughts on why black didn't play Bg4 at move #18?...looked pretty safe to me.> Qg5 safely answers the bishop fork by threatening a knight fork at NF6.
Sep-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <sevenseaman> Oops! delete, delete! Rats, too late....
Sep-27-11  sevenseaman: <SWT> <All well known theory up to 23...f3. 18...Bg4 is met by 19. Qg5, threatening Nf6.> A very good point you explained to a curious beginner; nevertheless we all learn.
Sep-27-11  sevenseaman: Relax <morf>! We all make typos and at times the clock takes these into history. Compared to <M.Hassan>'s <40...Kg6> yours is a peccadillo.
Sep-27-11  BishopofBlunder: <HeMateMe: Fooled me. I looked at the Queen sac, then automatically assumed the Rooks had to stay connected to deliver a mate.>

So did I. I don't know how I missed the f5 pawn protecting the rook check on g6. That's a real forehead slapper.

Sep-27-11  zb2cr: Found this one easily. As others have noted, the given game line is the "easy" variation; seeing the line if 39. ... Kh6; 40. Rg6+, Kh5; 41. Rh7+, Qh6; 42. Rhxh6# is what makes the puzzle.
Sep-27-11  Patriot: 38.Qxh7+ Kxh7 39.Rgxg7+ Kh6 40.Rg6+ Kh5 41.Rh7#? Well that's what I saw at 6:22am but of course 41...Qh6 42.Rhxh6#. Before that I went the wrong way: 40.Rh7+? Kg5 41.Rdg7+ Kxf5? (better is 42.Kf6) 42.Rf7+ Ke5 43.Rxf4 Rxf4 44.Re7+ and 45.Rxe3. Then I thought, "This is easy?"

There's some morning humor but shows what can happen when you start going down the wrong path (or when you try to solve a <CG> puzzle too early in the morning).

Sep-27-11  sevenseaman: <Then I thought, "This is easy?"> Ha ha <Patriot>!You drove your car a good distance on an empty tank!

A man went shopping, parking his car a fair distance away, sloppily leaving it unlocked.

When he returned to the car, sure enough he saw a young kid at the wheel, mock-steering the stationary car, furiously turning the steering wheel while doing impassioned "zhoo zhoo zhoom" with his frothing mouth, in an imitation of extreme high speed.

The old man was amused and good naturedly suggested. 'Very nice son, but you must put out a hand to indicate the way you are going to turn'.

"Run along old fag; who puts out a hand while flying a jet"?

Sep-27-11  KingV93: This may have been rated 'easy' but I found the continuations from the ♕ sac a bit difficult to figure out. First time I've felt so accomplished about getting a Tuesday puzzle!
Sep-27-11  Patriot: <sevenseaman> <Ha ha <Patriot>!You drove your car a good distance on an empty tank!> Absolutely! The wrong turn had other wrong turns because I thought there might be something down that road. But at least I didn't settle on it and found the superior 40.Rg6+, which should have been considered from the beginning and compared against 40.Rh7+. It was a "fork in the road" that I didn't even notice.

But really that happens all the time on this site. Someone doesn't compare their candidates and they choose a less forcing line, get into complications, and then try to justify their approach by saying "Doesn't this win also?" Sometimes it does but the point is that it could have been much easier if they considered the most forcing moves first. I've been guilty of this as well. Other times, the threat is stronger than the execution. A "check" may be more forcing but the threat is stronger. The point is it's a good idea to compare the candidates and judge which one looks more promising. This can prevent a lot of wild goose chases.

By the way, that was a rude kid in your story! :-)

Sep-27-11  nottogoodbeginner: easy one
Sep-27-11  Rubberbandman: Mondays and tuesdays always seem to consist of queen sacs.
Sep-27-11  newshutz: Yesterday, Monday, I wasted time looking for the queen sac, and today I wasted time avoiding looking at the queen sac.

I am relying on the Calendar too much :D

Sep-27-11  Rubberbandman: <newshutz> I always look for the queen sac early on in the week,providing there's one on the board of course.. Even then,if its a monday its still a queen sac ;-).. Hey just looked at your recent kibitzing and see your playing GM's in tourneys yourself..you should get some games up,whats your rating if you dont mind me asking ?
Sep-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has two pawns for a bishop.

Black threatens 38... Rxh3.

The weak black castle invites to play 38.Qxh7+, exposing the king to the attack of both rooks, 38... Kxh7 39.Rgxg7+:

A) 39... Kh6 40.Rg6+ Kh5 41.Rh7+ Qh6 42.Rhxh6#.

B) 39... Kh8 40.Rh7+ Kg8 41.Rdg7#.

Sep-27-11  Memethecat: I think at last I'm beginning to learn from past mistakes, I saw this answer quite quickly & assumed that the white rooks would make the same moves regardless, so I was about to rush & send my post but stopped myself (unlike last thursday) & had a closer look. <38Qxh7+ Kxh7. 39Rgxg7+> if <39...Kh8. 40Rh7+ Kg8. 41Rg7#> now this is the bit I almost missed, if <39...Kh6. 40Rg6+ Kh5. 41Rh7+ Qh6. 42Rxh6#>
Sep-27-11  Memethecat: <combokal> the real difference is that we know its a puzzle with an answer & a tuesday one at that, so it will be pretty easy. I'm sure if someone had whispered in J.Bs ear (there is a really simple mating combo) he would, like many here, have seen it in a flash.
Sep-27-11  awfulhangover: I'm proud of myself (happens rarely!), since I that after

38...Kxh7 39.R5xg7+ Kh6, 40.Rh7+ is a huge blunder :-), but 40.Rg6+! does the trick.

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