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Oldrich Duras vs Rudolf Swiderski
Vienna (1908), Vienna AUH, rd 5, Mar-28
Spanish Game: Morphy Defense. Duras Variation (C77)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-08-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jonathan Sarfati: The moves preceding the puzzle were fine as well. At first sight, one wonders why White put his pieces up there only to need to retreat and regroup. In reality, they were necessary to tie Black down to the Pf6 so White could double his rooks on the g-file without being challenged.
Oct-08-06  thesonicvision: well...
although i didn't solve the puzzle,
i did notice that there was no
immediate tactic. i noticed that
black is pretty much in zugzwang.
almost any movement by the black
queen or its rooks leads to either
mate or a heavy material loss.

what i didn't see was the idea to
rearrange the battery and get the
bishop on h6...which is really
what this puzzle is about.
*shrugs*

Oct-08-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I solved this one in TEN seconds! Yeah,and I was Pinocchio,I would have an 18 inch long nose:) lol

A case of modern trigger chess-retreat to attack! Or,as a boxer was told last night,"Pull those punches back!"

Oct-08-06  Milo: Bah. Is it just me, or are Sunday puzzles getting easier. I saw the solution instantly. In fact, I saw it faster than instantly. Before I even saw the main page, I said to myself, "the first move will be Be1, followed by the obvious buildup to mate".
Oct-08-06  tjshann: Milo,
No, it's not you. The Sunday puzzle has increasingly grown to resemble the Monday no-brainer. The folks that run this website need to step it up. I got this instantly.
Oct-08-06  echo unlucky: Squares: I got the same thing. If 27. Bxf6+, Rxf6 28. Rg7 and there's no way of avoiding mate that I can see, or am I completely blind...?

Oct-08-06  Suzuki50: <echo unlucky: Squares: I got the same thing. If 27. Bxf6+, Rxf6 28. Rg7> U forgot ur Queen at h6 !?
Oct-09-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: I am always amused by kibitzers who claim to have solved a puzzle like this one "instantly". I assume that what they mean is that they saw the first move instantly. No human can instantly see whether 27. ... dxc4 is an effective defense to the threat of 28. Bb4; and figuring that out is just the start of what I would consider solving this puzzle. The steady marshalling of White’s forces from move 29 through 33 is fairly easy to see, but less immediately forcing than is typical in most puzzles, so again, it takes a little time to check against the possibility of countershots from Black. All-in-all, I think this is a good puzzle for late in the week. For a good Monday puzzle, the position after 35. … Bg6 would be suitable.
Oct-09-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <Squares: I may be being a little simple but if Bxf6, Rxf6 and then white rook moves to g7, how can black respond?> After 27. Bxf6 Rxf6 28. Rg7, Black simply plays 28. ... Rxh6.
Oct-09-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: I don't think it is a mate in 12. Black can activate his bishop with a pawn sac. After 27.Be1 dxc4 28.dxc4 then 28...a5! 29.Bxa5 Ba6 the threat of Bxc4 forces white's hand 30.Bb4 Qxb4 31.Rg7 Qxc4+ 32.Kb1 Qf1+ and, who knows, Black may even hold.
Oct-10-06  Suzuki50: Certainly Duras' plan was based on a geometric motive, but he missed a really beautiful combination (D. Bronstein) 25. Rg7 Rxg7 26. BXf6 Qf7 27. Rg1 Rg8 28. Rg4 Bc8 29. Qxh7+ Kxh7 30. Rh4# !
Oct-11-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <Calli> <After 27.Be1 dxc4 28.dxc4 then 28...a5! 29.Bxa5 Ba6 the threat of Bxc4 forces white's hand 30.Bb4 Qxb4 31.Rg7 Qxc4+ 32.Kb1 Qf1+ ...> Maybe 30.Bd8 Qb7 (30...Qxd8 31.Rg7...) 31.Bxf6+ Rxf6 32.Rxf6...

<Suzuki50> Cool! Where did you find this (Bronstein) combo?

Oct-11-06  Suzuki50: <Gypsy> He wrote about it around 80s (but I suppose he knew much earlier).
Oct-11-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <Suzuki50: ... He wrote about it around 80s ... > Do you remember which of his books; or was it an article?
Oct-11-06  Plato: <No human can instantly see whether 27. ... dxc4 is an effective defense to the threat of 28. Bb4>

Except maybe Kasparov... although one can make a pretty strong argument that he's not human.

Oct-11-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: <Gypsy> How are you doing? 30.Bd8? Qxd8?? Black capture with the rook Rxd8.

<Suzuki50> Excellent one from Bronstein. Turns out the real puzzle in this game is on move 25.

Oct-11-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <Calli: <Gypsy> How are you doing? > Well, obviously not that hot -- to miss that! (Lol.)

I'v been spending most of my time on mathematics these days. And my chess time now goes towards looking over some old games again; had enough of the Topalov/Danailov show.

Btw., I noted you'v added a ton of great, often critical lines to various AAA games. Thanks for the stellar work!

Oct-11-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: <Gypsy> thanks! I've also discovered that AA made the same mistake in all his losses! This is according to CG kibitzers :-) See Game Collection: Alekhin was drunk!
Oct-11-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <Calli> That is great! A priceless collection: Pitty it hasn't made it yet to AAA home-page.
Oct-11-06  Suzuki50: <Gypsy> It was his book "Teach yourself chess" (in Russian, I don't know whether an English translation). That's quite excellent book in which he firstly introduced the concept of power lines that you may see often now in chessbase commented games.
Oct-11-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <Suzuki50> Thanks! Must be <The Modern Chess Self-Tutor> in English translation.
May-10-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  mig55: Duras knew very well what he was doing bcause he announced mate in 12 after Be1, what was not coorect (today's pc's can stand a mittle bit longer), but he calculated the whoe thing by Heart...
Nov-17-10  sevenseaman: Thanks < Suzuki50> for the Bronstein comment. The hard yards put in by you have added to an improved enjoyment of this interesting game.
Oct-07-11  DrGridlock: This game was apparently a Sunday puzzle in 2006, starting at White's move 27. It might be worth revisiting as another puzzle, (Wednesday?) starting at White's move 25

<Jonathan Sarfati: The moves preceding the puzzle were fine as well. At first sight, one wonders why White put his pieces up there only to need to retreat and regroup. In reality, they were necessary to tie Black down to the Pf6 so White could double his rooks on the g-file without being challenged.>

Not so fast, my friend!

There has been some discussion of Bronstein's commentary of this game. In "The Modern Chess Tutor" (1995 English translation), Bronstein writes,

"The method of invading the rook at g7 is so hackneyed and thoroughly studied that the only surprising thing is that Duras stopped his rook at g6 and did not play it to g7."

Oct-30-16  parisattack: Notwithstanding Rg6 instead of Rg7, a nice example of the Duras Variation of the Lopez (d3 & c4).

A modern example White takes a different approach:

Granda Zuniga vs L Krysa, 2014

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