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Osvaldo Manuel Bazan vs Robert James Fischer
"Blind Alley" (game of the day May-12-2007)
Mar del Plata (1960), Mar del Plata ARG, rd 8, Apr-07
Queen's Gambit Declined: Ragozin Defense (D38)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 28...Rhe8 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-12-07  tal lover: BAG on 17...Bc7 Bazan see that if the queen doesnt protect the pawn on d5 he can takes the pawn and pinning the bishop on e6 (Re1 dont let the bishop leave because the king is on e8), so he forces the queen to move to a square that doesnt protect d5, so Bazan see that he can trade pieces and open lines with this move, which is not bad for one who is behind in material
May-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Soltis suggests that this is why this "forgotten gem" didn't make it into MSMG.> But a gem nonetheless. Nice choice for GOTD -- I never saw it before.
May-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <BAG: Move 21 why not take blacks queen for free?> 21. Qxf4 Ne2+ 22. Kh1 Nxf4 23. dxe6 Nxe6 23. Rxc4 h5, and white remains a ♙ down, with a lost endgame. (But that's better than getting mated.)
May-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessmensch: As a learning player, I found black's play to be very instructive. However, he was in control throughout the game; it seemed hardly a match. Anyone know Bazan's rating? His won/lost record is unimpressive. Further, look at the names he lost against vs. those he defeated.
May-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: Bazan must have thought that 17.Bc7 was a clever little shot, having no idea what he was getting into.

This is the sort of tactical play you see from super GMs. It's not the initial earthquake that causes the damage, but all the little aftershocks.

May-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Bazan must have thought that 17.Bc7 was a clever little shot, having no idea what he was getting into.>

You may be right. But I suspect he already thought his position was bad and was trying to find a way to save it. Instead of 17. Bc7, 17. e5? is obviously horrible and 17. exd5 Qxd5 leaves White with nothing for the pawn that I can see. The position is reminiscent of this old classic:


click for larger view

Steinitz vs Lasker, 1896

May-12-07  Peter Nemenyi: Chessmensch: <Anyone know Bazan's rating? His won/lost record is unimpressive. Further, look at the names he lost against vs. those he defeated.>

No one is claiming that Bazan was very good. It's just a fact of life that great players produce a lot of their most artistically pleasing games against inferior opposition, not their peers. If we only knew Kasparov from his games against Karpov he'd look like a boring drawing master.

May-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  GreenCastle: Is Bazan a blind man? That would explain Bc7. I'm looking to understand the pun.
May-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <greencastle> A blind alley is a dead end or cul-de-sac. It's where the white King finds himself at the end of the game.

May-12-07  mvnonup08: Gotta love Fishy!
May-12-07  mvnonup08: I think 25 Rxe2 works, as Fisher has to give up two minor pieces for a rook, thus black is up one point and has the inititative.
May-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: After 25. Rxe2 Bb5 26 Rec2 Bxc4 27. Rxc4 White is down the exchange and is losing. (Remember, White was down a piece before 25. Rxe2.)
May-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Fischer's attacking style is inescapable-as is the final mating combination. The king is in prison and the rooks are coming in for the kill
Oct-20-07  PAWNTOEFOUR: great game!!!..........bazan didn't know what hit him<peter nemenyi>great players produce a lot of their most artistically pleasing games against inferior opposition, not their peers....so i guess you can lump larson,taimanov,petrosian and spassky into that catagory to
Feb-02-08  zev22407: After the game Bronstein sugested 17)N-e5 with Q-h5 and f4.
Feb-02-08  D4n: 30..Ng3!
Jun-26-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Flemming: What if White had played 16.Ne5 instead of 16.e4?

I could come up only with 16... Nxe5 17. Bxe5 O-O.

Oct-22-09  linmaica: Osvaldo Bazán was a very strong argentinian master. He was born in the city of Cordoba, were lived the great Erich Eliskases. Eliskases created a very powerful chess school, but the cordobian masters played almost only in local tournements, and were little known even in Argentina. Bazan made draw with Fischer in another game.
Feb-02-14  Chris321: Ah Fisher was Fisher!,i see in him that extra X factor that is necessary on his level,Kasparov had it,now Carlsen got it too!.It separates the Mozartz's from the mere rappers an that's just how it is!.
Feb-02-14  Bobby Spassky: Who is Fisher. Perhaps you mean Fischer.
Aug-03-14  daugava: I was surprised by 27… Ke7, didn't expect that Black would want his knight to get pinned again :)
May-25-15  Smite: A great game to kick off the study of the Ragozin.
May-17-16  1971: I never noticed how sharp Fischer played.
May-18-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: Hi daugava,

" I was surprised by 27… Ke7, didn't expect that Black would want his knight to get pinned again :)"

I can see your smiley but just in case others miss it.


click for larger view

If 27....Kg8 nor 27...Kg7 then Rxg4+ mates Black.

Mar-14-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: Going after the pawn with 11..Qa5 is quite risky. Chekhov in 1981 won a game with 16 Ne5.
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