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Boris Spassky vs Robert James Fischer
Fischer - Spassky World Championship Match (1972)  ·  Alekhine Defense: Modern Variation. Main Line (B05)  ·  1/2-1/2
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-08-13  Hesam7: <Calli: A tremedous game somewhat forgotten because its a draw. I recall the players moved rapid fire after 18.Nxd5, sending the analysts in a tizzy tryng to figure out what was happening.>

Actually according to the times listed here: http://www.crackteam.org/2008/11/12... Spassky took 15 minutes for 19 Bh5 and Fischer took 12 minutes 19...cd5 and another 8 minutes for 20...Rf7.

Mar-08-13  Hesam7: <PVS: White would perhaps have been better off having played 18. Qe1.>

Looking at the game I am coming to the same conclusion, Spassky's 18 Nd5 is flashy but more forcing and it does not result in any tangible plus for White. After 18 Qe1 here is what the engine likes: 18...Bc5 19 dc5 Qc5 20 Rf2 d4 21 Na4 Qe5 22 Nb2 Nd7 23 Rc2 Rac8 24 Rac1 Qd6 25 Nc4 Qc7 26 e5 c5


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and White should have a large advantage. Of course 18...Bc5 is not forced but Black's choices are very limited since after 18 Qe1, the threat of Nd5 is stronger ...

Mar-08-13  beatgiant: <Hesam7>
After 18. Qe1, Black could try <18...Bh4> 19. Qxh4 Qxc3 20. exd5 exd5. Although White still has some initiative, it looks to me like Black can defend himself.
Mar-08-13  Hesam7: <beatgiant: <Hesam7> After 18. Qe1, Black could try <18...Bh4> 19. Qxh4 Qxc3 20. exd5 exd5. Although White still has some initiative, it looks to me like Black can defend himself.>

Actually this seems to be losing after 18 Qe1 Bh4 19 Qh4 Qc3 20 ed5 ed5? 21 e6!


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Black only has 21...Qe3 22 Kh1 Qe6 23 Bg4 Qe8 24 Rae1 Qd8 25 Qd8 Rd8 26 Re7


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Mar-08-13  Hesam7: This probably means that after 18 Qe1 Bh4 19 Qh4 Qc3 20 ed5 Black should play 20...cd5 after which he seems to hold. However this is not the end of it, White can improve too: 20 Qf2! and after 20...Na6 21 Rab1 Rab8 22 Rb8 Nb8 23 Bg4 Nd7 24 ed5 cd5 25 Kh2


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Black is running out of moves, none of his pieces except for the Queen can move ...

Mar-09-13  beatgiant: <Hesam7>
Yes, I underestimated <21. e6> in your line posted above. If Black has to play 20...cxd5 conceding a passed c-pawn, this defense is not worth considering.

But, is 23...Qe8 really necessary?
After 18 Qe1 Bh4 19 Qxh4 Qxc3 20 exd5 exd5 21 e6 Qe3+ 22 Kh1 Qxe6 23 Bg4, how about <23...f5> or even <23...Qe3>. Does White have an outright win?

Mar-09-13  RookFile: Gligoric had suggested 18. Qe1 back in the day.
Mar-09-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Yeah, in his book on the match Gligoric already noted that 18.Qe1 might have been more efficient, though the details of his analysis turn out as not very reliable - he goes on to say that after 18...Bg5 19.exd5 cxd5 20.Nxd5 Qxe1 21.Raxe1 exd5 22.Bxd5 Na6 23.Rxf7 Rxf7 24.Bxa8 Kf8 White would have nothing clear in his favor, which is true, but misses that in this variation White has a forced win by 23.e6! (again) 23...Rad8 24.Rf5!

<After 18 Qe1 Bh4 19 Qxh4 Qxc3 20 exd5 exd5 21 e6 Qe3+ 22 Kh1 Qxe6 23 Bg4, how about <23...f5> or even <23...Qe3>. Does White have an outright win?> Yes - 23...f5 loses to 24.Bxf5! Rxf5 25.Rae1, and 23...Qe3 to 24.Rae1 Qh6 (else 25.Rxf7!) 25.Qe7 and Black has no good defence against Qb7 (he can save the rook, but would lose the knight).

Mar-09-13  beatgiant: <Eyal>
I'm still missing something: 18. Qe1 Bh4 19. Qxh4 Qxc3 20. exd5 exd5 21. e6 Qe3+ 22. Kh1 Qxe6 23. Bg4 f5 24. Bxf5 Rxf5 25. Rae1 Rxf1+ 26. Rxf1 Na6 seems to hold.
Mar-09-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <beatgiant> Ah, sorry - I was assuming 22.Kh2 instead of Kh1, which is what White has to play in order for this to work (so that 25...Rxf1 doesn't come with check); though even with the king on h1 there's actually another win by 25.Qd8+ Kf7 26.Rxf5+ Qxf5 27.Re1 Qd7 28.Qh8! etc.
Mar-09-13  diceman: <beatgiant: <Eyal> I'm still missing something: 18. Qe1 Bh4 19. Qxh4 Qxc3 20. exd5>

What about
(to avoid 21.e6)

something like:

20...cxd5
21.Rac1 Qa3
22.c6 Qa6
23.c7 Nc6
24.Be2 Qb6
25.Bd3 h6
26.Rc5 Qxc7
27.Rfc1 Qd8
28.Qf4 Ne7
29.Rc7 Rc8
30.Rxa7 Rxc1+
31.Qxc1 Qb6
32.Ra4 Nc6
33.Kh2 Rc8

?????

I only looked at this quickly.

Mar-09-13  diceman: For the record:

Timman in
“The Art of Chess Analysis”
credits Olafsson for finding 18.Qe1.

Timman thought 17...Qa5 was directed against
white playing 18.Qa4.

Since 18.Qe1 didn’t allow Qa4 anymore, he thought
Fischer’s best after 18.Qe1 was to go back to d8,
18…Qd8.

Timman also thought Fischer chose the “dubious” pawn break, 14...b6.

He called 14...f6, “the other method”
and said,

“Petrosian draws attention to 14...Nc6,
a typical Petrosian waiting move.”

Mar-12-13  Hesam7: Kasparov in OMGP4 does not think 18 Nd5 spoils anything, instead he claims that 19 Qd3!


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was the right way to go with the main line being 19...Na6 20 h4! Bh4 21 Ne3. However Kasparov's analysis has a hole, he dismisses 19...ed5 20 ed5 Na6 21 d6! because 21...Nc5 is "insufficient": 22 dc5 Qc5 23 Kh1 Qe5 24 Bc6 Rad8 25 d7. But Black can improve with 23...Rae8 24 d7 Re5 25 Rae1 g6 26 Re5 Qe5 27 Bc6 Bd8


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And compared to Kasparov's line Black has managed to exchange a pair of rooks which does help his defense a great deal.

Mar-12-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime: ^^^

I understand the search for perfection in chess but the magic and resonance of these moves at that time more than equals any 30/40/100 year post mortem.

Aug-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: After 18.Nxd5:


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Rybka 4.1 x64:

[+0.85] d=26 18...Bg5 19.Bh5 cxd5 <20.exd5> Qc3 21.dxe6 Nc6 22.exf7+ Kh8 23.Bf3 Rxf7 24.Bxc6 Rxf1+ 25.Kxf1 Rf8+ 26.Kg1 Be3+ 27.Kh1 Bxd4 28.Rc1 Qa3 29.e6 Bxc5 30.Bb5 a5 31.Rc2 Qb4 32.a4 Be7 33.Rc4 Qa3

Aug-18-13  RookFile: I think it's fair to say that Fischer made a misstep in the opening and should have been punished. He was in some trouble and showed resourceful defense.
Aug-19-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: After 18.Qe1:


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Rybka 4.1 x64:

[+0.67] d=25 18...Qc7 19.Kh1 Nd7 20.exd5 exd5 21.Bg4 Rae8 22.Ne2 Bg5 23.Qg3 Bh6 24.Nf4 f5 25.Bd1 Qa5 26.Bb3 Qd2 27.Rad1

Aug-19-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: After 19.Qd3:


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Rybka 4.1 x64:

[+0.45] d=26 19...exd5 20.exd5 Na6 21.Qc4 Rab8 22.Rad1 Nc7 23.d6 Rb4 24.Qc3 Nb5 25.Qe1 Qa3 26.e6 Qe3 27.Kh1 Qxe1 28.exf7 Rxf7 29.Rdxe1 g6 30.d5 Rc4 31.dxc6 Rxc5 32.d7 Kg7 33.Rd1 Rf8 34.Rfe1 Bd8

Aug-23-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: Summarizing with a final post:

After 18.Qe1:


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Rybka 4.1 x64:

[+0.70] d=28 18...Qb4 19.Rd1 Na6 20.exd5 exd5 21.Kh1 Kh8 22.Bg4 Rab8 23.Rf3 Nc7 24.Kh2 Qc4 25.Bd7 Ne6 26.Qf2 Nd8 27.e6 Rb7 28.Re1 f5 29.a3 Rb3

[+0.74] d=28 18...Qc7 19.Kh1 Nd7 20.exd5 exd5 21.Bg4 Bd8 22.e6 Nf6 23.exf7+ Kh8 24.Be6 Qe7 25.Rf3 Rb8 26.Re3 Ba5 27.Bxd5 Bxc3 28.Rxe7 Bxe1 29.Raxe1 Nxd5 30.Re8 Nf6 31.Rxb8 Rxb8

After 18.Nxd5:


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Rybka 4.1 x64:

[+0.85] d=28 18...Bg5 19.Bh5 cxd5 <20.exd5> Qc3 21.dxe6 Nc6 22.exf7+ Kh8 23.Bf3 Rxf7 24.Bxc6 Rxf1+ 25.Kxf1 Rf8+ 26.Kg1 Be3+ 27.Kh1 Bxd4 28.Rc1 Qa3 29.e6 Bxc5 30.Bb5 a5 31.Rc2 Qb4 32.a4 Be7 33.Rc4 Qa3

After 18.Nxd5 Bg5 19.Qd3:


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Rybka 4.1 x64:

[+0.37] d=29 19...exd5 20.exd5 Na6 21.Qc4 Rab8 22.Rad1 Nc7 23.d6 Rb4 24.Qc3 Nb5 25.Qe1 Qa3 26.e6 Qe3 27.Kh1 Qxe1 28.exf7 Rxf7 29.Rdxe1 g6 30.d5 Rc4 31.dxc6 Rxc5 32.d7 Kg7 33.Rd1 Bd8 34.Rfe1 Rf8

After 18.Nxd5 Bg5 19.Bh5 cxd5 20.exd5


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Rybka 4.1 x64:

[+0.85] d=26 20...Qc3 21.dxe6 Nc6 22.exf7+ Kh8 23.Bf3 Rxf7 24.Bxc6 Rxf1+ 25.Kxf1 Rf8+ 26.Kg1 Be3+ 27.Kh1 Bxd4 28.Rc1 Qa3 29.e6 Bxc5 30.Bf3 Qe3 31.Rc4 Qe5 32.Re4 Qf6 33.Qc1 Bd6 34.Qd2 Be7 35.Qd7 a6

[+0.94] d=26 20...f5 21.Bf3 Na6 22.d6 Rac8 23.Bb7 Rb8 24.c6 Nb4 25.Qb3 Nd5 26.Kh2 g6 27.Rab1 Rf7 28.Rf3 Kg7 29.Qa3 Qd2 30.Qb2 Qa5 31.Ra3 Qb6 32.Rb3

[+0.98] d=25 20...g6 21.dxe6 Na6 22.exf7+ Kg7 23.Kh1 Nxc5 24.Qg4 Be7 25.dxc5 Qxc5 26.Qf3 Rad8 27.Bg4 Qxe5 28.Rae1 Qg5 29.Be6 Rd4 30.g3 Bd6 31.Rf2 Qd8 32.Bb3 Bc5 33.Rc2

Sep-03-13  Howard: Geller later found a likely improvement in 13.Bf4, with the idea of keeping the bishop pair. He played it twice against Timman in 1975, winning one and drawing the other.
Sep-03-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: There was also Geller vs Hecht, 1973.
May-05-14  Everett: Reading the above analysis and knowing the players, it makes perfect sense that Kasparov would try to make the sacrificial 18.Nd5 work, whereas I could see Karpov playing 18.Qe1 and tightening the screws. The man was never in a rush.
Jun-03-14  Howard: It was believed for awhile that 24.Rc7 would have given good winning chances, and the late Larry Evans once discussed this move in his monthly CL column back in 1988.

But, as I recall, Kasparov's MGP indicated that Black had a defense---don't recall it though.

Jun-04-14  Howard: By the way, I just looked at Timman's analysis of the game in his classic Art of Chess Analysis, and he mentions that rather than play 20.Bf7+, White should first have interposed 20.exd5.

Any comments from Uncle Fritz or his relatives ?

Jun-04-14  RookFile: See comments from above on August 23.
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