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Gata Kamsky vs Vladimir Kramnik
"Gata Go Now" (game of the day Feb-18-2009)
PCA Candidates Quarter-final (1994), New York, NY USA, rd 1, Jun-??
Semi-Slav Defense: Botvinnik System (D44)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The rook and two bishops more than make up for the queen.
Feb-18-09  Yerbamate: Hello. I can't see right now who wins with 21...Kb8 variation. Looks its black with the two pawns near to 1st row.
Feb-18-09  cgnascim: After this game...Kamsky could be the next player for the crown....
Feb-18-09  WhiteRook48: Gata sacrifice so much
Feb-18-09  hedgeh0g: What a beautiful game. Games like these always inspire me.
Feb-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: I think this had all been played before (pioneered by an American IM) until 23. Nc3! Great stuff.
Feb-18-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Travis Bickle: What a masterpiece by Kamsky!!
Mar-19-09  beast8: <Gata Go Now> hee hee hee Kamsky pwns Drawnik and runs :-D :-D
Oct-16-09  WhiteRook48: before Drawnik can get revenge
May-03-10  James Bowman: What a master piece this one is. Kramnik was so out classed I feel for him. I guess I never gave Kamsky his do, when he plays a good one it is very good indeed and Kramnik is very hard to beat by anyone.
May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Fun to revisit this one!
Sep-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: crazy cool game
Nov-26-10  sevenseaman: Great chess! This game is full of good moves; they kept coming.
Nov-26-10  GilesFarnaby: I think the novelty here is 24...Bc5, up until then they were following known theory (Salov-Illescas from a year before)

So, yes, Kramnik put a novelty on the board just to blunder 3 moves after with 27...Rb8 (27...Bxe3 would have probably held) and now a lot of kibitzers praise Kamsky´s creativity and exalt his performance in this game because yeah! Who cares about historic perspective anyway?

Jun-03-11  Helloween: This is a great game and full of nice moves, but<GilesFarnaby> is correct: it is unfortunately mostly theory. Back in 1994 when this game was played, the first new move in the game was 24...Bc5. I agree that this game gets way too much praise for basically being a rehashed sac line that's been played dozens of times before. Kramnik made the novelty, got a tad careless and blundered in a very sharp position . If anything, Kamsky was playing drawishly here, yet the exact opposite is touted and he's praised for this game!

Sometimes chess players are very myopic.

Anyways, this line is considered fine for Black now after 21.Kb8!

Apr-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jambow: A beautiful game is a beautiful game if theoretical or not.

Maybe we are not so myopic maybe you can't see the aesthetic appeal of harmonious bishops of sacked queens, of dogged king hunts? No matter how it comes about this is still one of my favorite games of all time.

May-21-15  ribbiteyes: this was one beautiful game
Aug-30-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: How would white continue after 23...Qh5 24 h3 Rd8 ?
Aug-31-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  NeverAgain: <Jim Bartle: How would white continue after 23...Qh5 24 h3 Rd8 ?>

23...Qh5 is not a legal move.

Feb-05-16  Howard: Well, I'm glad I'm not the only one who makes those kinds of mistakes! Check it my Foot-in-the-Mouth comments for Fischer-Geller, Skopje, 1967.
May-29-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: An excerpt from "Garry Kasparov's Chess Challenge" (Cadogan Chess, London, 1994) by Kasparov (translated and edited by Ken Neat) after 22 ... e5:


click for larger view

<This wild position is quite well known to theoreticians. White has two minor pieces and a pawn for a queen, but the pawn at b7 is worth a great deal! In the Botvinnik Variation such irrational positions often arise, and demand exceptional accuracy of the two players - the value of every move is exceptionally high. Kramnik's opening repertoire is splendidly polished, yet when employing such sharp variations there is always the risk of being the victim of a problem-like idea. And it is something of this sort that occurs in the present game.> 23. Nc3! <This knight sacrifice is the best way to retain the initiative. The standard pawn break is ineffective here - 23. b3 c3.> bxc3 24. bxc3 Bc5 <A new move; earlier 24 ... Rd6 had been played.> 25. cxd4 <Simple and strong. 25. Rfb1 suggests itself, but Black has a strong rejoinder - 25 ... Rd1+! 26. Rxd1 Bxe3 27. fxe3 Qb6.> Bxd4 26. Rfb1 Qc5 27. Ra6 Rb8 <In his preparations for the game Kramnik must certainly have analysed a similar position, but he clearly overlooked his opponent's brilliant reply.> 28. Bc1!! <This temporary retreat of the dark-square bishop proves decisive, since Black is unable to prevent it from being transferred to d6 via a3. Such finds enrich the store of original strategic ideas. Kramnik makes a desperate attempt to save the position, but every move by White is very precise, and the dismal end for Black inexorably approaches.>

At the end: <This striking win by Kamsky was a major factor in his overall victory in the match.>

*****

"it is unfortunately mostly theory. Back in 1994 when this game was played, the first new move in the game was 24...Bc5. I agree that this game gets way too much praise for basically being a rehashed sac line that's been played dozens of times before. Kramnik made the novelty, got a tad careless and blundered in a very sharp position . If anything, Kamsky was playing drawishly here, yet the exact opposite is touted and he's praised for this game! Sometimes chess players are very myopic. Anyways, this line is considered fine for Black now after 21.Kb8!"

Bah!

Aug-24-17  Tietie007: Incredible game !
Aug-24-17  Howard: Yes, it was certainly mind-boggling. For the record, Inside Chess magazine did an excellent job annotating it, back in '94, but I seem to recall that they never really pinpointed where Black went wrong.

In other words, at one point did White have a completely won position?

Aug-24-17  Retireborn: 22...e5 is the first mistake and should be replaced with 22...Bc5 according to Houdini. However Ftacnik (writing for CB Magazine) correctly identifies 27...Rb8 as the losing move, and his suggestion of 27...c3 allows Black to keep fighting.
Aug-25-17  Howard: Looked briefly at this game last night in Informant 61---don't recall what it said though.
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