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Anatoly Karpov vs Garry Kasparov
Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Match (1987), Seville ESP, rd 5, Oct-23
Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange. Seville Variation (D87)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-30-04  Jim Bartle: I don't understand. Kasparov DID play 37...Ra1 and resigned a move later.
May-30-04  csmath: Kasparov made errors with 33. ... Rd1 and 36. ... Qd7 and then a blunder with 37. ... Ra1. Time was apparently a factor. Karpov had a significantly better opening but he wasted it away and by move 20 it was very much a draw, in fact with a black initiative. The critical variation would be 33. ... h5 34. Qc4 ... Qxc4, 35. Rxc4 ... Nxg3, 36. Kxg3 ... a5 with a draw.
May-30-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  meloncio: <Jim Bartle> I think WMD meant 36. ... Ra1!; thus the queen in d6 protected the a6 pawn.

<csmath><Time was apparently a factor> Sure! I was there ...

May-30-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  meloncio: Correction: I mean ...the black queen in e6 protected the a6 pawn..
May-30-04  WMD: <<Jim Bartle> I think WMD meant 36. ... Ra1!; thus the queen on e6 protected the a6 pawn.> Quite so. Silly me.
Oct-03-06  Everett: <<csmath:>Kasparov made errors with 33. ... Rd1 and 36. ... Qd7 and then a blunder with 37. ... Ra1. Time was apparently a factor. Karpov had a significantly better opening but he wasted it away and by move 20 it was very much a draw>

What improvements do you see for white before move 20? Certainly, I would rather be black after that.

Jan-04-07  seeminor: if you go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8W9G...

you can see the end of this game as it was played, complete with Kasparov looking distraught after 38 Qxg6+

Jan-04-07  kellmano: Excellent videolink <seeminor>
Dec-31-07  Jim Bartle: Very good video analysis by Leontxo and Calvo, focusing on the disaster for black if 25. Rxb5, and how Kasparov missed 36...Ra1.
Feb-26-08  apexin: what compensation does black have for a pawn after sacrificed on move 13?
Jul-27-08  Cactus: Is this called the Seville variation because of this game?
Feb-06-09  notyetagm: <seeminor: if you go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8W9G... you can see the end of this game as it was played, complete with Kasparov looking distraught after 38 Qxg6+>

Great link.

Feb-06-09  notyetagm: 36 ... ?


click for larger view

(VAR)
36 ... ♖c1-a1! <remove the guard>


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(VAR)
37 ♖a4x♖a1?? <deflection from g4> ♕e6xg4#


click for larger view

<WMD: Kasparov was short of time and missed 36...Ra1! with an equal position.>

Yes, 36 ... ♖c1-a1! would have been a great move by Kasparov, attacking the White a4-rook <DEFENDER> of the <LOOSE> g4-mating square to <REMOVE THE GUARD>.

Jun-29-09  Knight13: <a blunder with 37. ... Ra1.> 37... Ka7 is not good enough.
Jun-25-13  csmath: Interesting that are not that many comments for one of the most important Grunfeld games of 20th century.

Obviously the game was spoiled in time trouble.

Aug-11-13  csmath: One thing is interesting about these games (5th and 7th round) is that neither Kasparov nor Zaitsev considered move

15. ...Nc4!?

nor did anybody (on the top level) attempted this move in 25 years after this match.

According to what I have the move equalizes the game in rather tactical way:

15. ...Nc4!?
16. Bf2 Qd5
17. g5 ("standard" approach) Rf8
18. Kg1 Qf7
19. Qe1 Na3
20. Rd1 Nc2
21. e6 Qxe6
22. Qd2 Qf7
23. Ng3 Na3!
24. dxc5 Nb5
25. Ne4 Nxc3
26. Nxc3 Bxc3
27. Qc2 Be5
28. Rd7 Bxh2
29. Kxh2 Qxf2
30. Qxf2 Rxf2
31. Rxb7 Rxa2

with an obvious draw.

Aug-11-13  csmath: In the game

Yusupov vs M Agopov, 2009

Mikhael Agopov came close to this but he has chosen inferior setup (b5 and Rc8) and lost to Yusupov.

Nov-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: After 11...Na5


click for larger view

This position had been reached many times before. Karpov played a very rare move, a desperado move in fact: 12.Bxf7+. It wins a pawn, although that pawn is doubled.
The players played this dull old opening over and over again in this match - and in other events. A general sort of starting position was the position after 17.Kg1:


click for larger view

Apr-10-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Exemplary play by Karpov. He arrived at the match "loaded for bear" as we say in the USA, meaning he was ready for whatever.

Twice he took the lead in the match early, and a third time very late, after game 23.

However, fortunately for those folks who hate communist heroes, Anatoly did not win the match! Thus, Gary retained the title and the man who usurped the title from Bobby, the man who benefited from the destruction of Korchnoi's family, this man was prevented from regaining the WC title by a freedom fighter named Kasparov.

Sep-03-15  Everett: <However, fortunately for those folks who hate communist heroes, Anatoly did not win the match! Thus, Gary retained the title and the man who usurped the title from Bobby, the man who benefited from the destruction of Korchnoi's family, this man was prevented from regaining the WC title by a freedom fighter named Kasparov.>

It's a nice story, at least.

Sep-03-15  Petrosianic: A bit far fetched, though.
Sep-03-15  Everett: <Petrosianic> agreed!
Nov-19-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: OK, how did Karpov not benefit from the destruction of Korchnoi's family?

Maybe the other part was far fetched, but not this part!

Sep-02-17  nummerzwei: Instead of Kasparov's 24...b5, all sorts of computer programs propose that Black can get a more or less decisive advantage with the shocking 24...g5!?:


click for larger view

This is one of the most striking examples of a 'computer move' that I've seen. The point is that Black rules out a future Nf4, and is now ready to invade White's position with ...Bf2 and ...Ne3.

Sep-02-17  Nerwal: <24...g5!? is one of the most striking examples of a 'computer move' that I've seen.>

It sure looks so but neverthless 24... g5 is already mentioned by older sources including Karpov's book on the Grünfeld.

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