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Garry Kasparov vs Anatoly Karpov
Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Match (1990), Lyon FRA, rd 24, Dec-31
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Nimzo-English Opening (A17)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-30-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  wwall: If 28...Qb6, then 29.Rcb1 Qa7 30.Bb4 Qb6 31.Ra6 Qc7 32.Rxc6 Qxc6 33.Qxd7 should win for White.

Perhaps best is 32...Qxa1+ 33.Rxa1 f6.

If 33...h3, then 34.Bxg5 hxg2 35.Rda3.

After 36.Rxa4 Nxa4 37.Rxa4 Qc6 38.Rb4 and White is winning.

Since Kasparov only needed a draw to win the match, he took it, winning $1.7 million and a million dollar trophy. Karpov received $1.3 million for his effort.

Jul-13-06  lopezexchange: The final position is a clear as crystal win for white. EG: 36...Nxa4; 37.Rxa4,Rb3; 38.Bf1,Reb8; 39.Ra2,Rb1; 40.Qd2,Qxd2; 41.Bxd2, crushes black.
Dec-06-06  lopium: Yes, it seems totally won by white. But wwall explained why Kasparov accepted a draw.
Dec-23-08  Paraconti: Stop stuttering, man!
Apr-07-09  WhiteRook48: why?! He could have done with a win, but maybe he didn't want to drag it out.
Apr-23-09  WhiteRook48: why not 36. Bxc5 Qxc5 37. Rxa4
May-28-09  Makiavel: Q*c5+!!! white have to move the king or protect with their queen and the bishop is safe on the next move
Jul-01-09  Knight13: <Karpov received $1.3 million for his effort.> WHAT!?
Aug-29-09  guoduke: kasparov offered the draw because he thought the match was already over
Sep-17-09  Pacemace: What a game dude, Strong move & position by Kasparov. White should won this without a draw.
Sep-17-09  goldenbear: I believed Black to be winning after 23.g4, as White has the stupidest and most awkwardly placed pieces I've seen. But then I looked and looked, and I'm just unable to see anything that doesn't give White the advantage. I concluded that 23.Qd6 (if 23.Qe6, which is what I was thinking, then doesn't Nxc5 work for White?) was the best move and that Black has to draw from a slightly inferior position.
Apr-18-10  I play the Fred: A...person named AVRO38 claimed that Karpov missed 23...Nh7 wins in this game and he cited, without specific reference, top computer analysis which said 23...Nh7 was a winning move. Because I know AVRO38 will not give me any specific reference to this computer analysis, can anyone else here point me in that direction?

If no one can, this confirms what I suspected: AVRO38 was making it all up.

Apr-18-10  Paraconti: THIS game was never played at the 1990 world championship match! Not unless it was just for fun.
Nov-27-10  talisman: ohhhhhhh yea it was. for money not fun.
Apr-10-11  williscreek: The players talk about this game and each other in these vids: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkvL...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEX9...
Apr-22-13  Everett: <23..Nh7> is likely better than what was played. As long as Karpov strongpoints e5, a knight on g5, potentially using e6 to eye d4 and f4, would greatly improve the scope of this piece.

It is not a win afaik, lots can happen, but this rerouting is worthy of consideration. White's position certainly seems awkward.

Apr-22-13  RookFile: I think Kasparov played a dual plan of making the b7 bishop worthless and also for kingside attack. Karpov did the right thing in taking the draw - he was on course to lose by 13 to 11 rather than 12.5 to 11.5.
Apr-22-13  Everett: <RookFile: I think Kasparov played a dual plan of making the b7 bishop worthless and also for kingside attack. Karpov did the right thing in taking the draw - he was on course to lose by 13 to 11 rather than 12.5 to 11.5.>

Perhaps, but by move 23 Kasparov executed the dual plan of making his own g2 bishop worthless and created targets out of his backward pawns. Karpov's play after that gifted Kasparov a pawn and the game.

Apr-22-13  RookFile: I'm sure Kasparov was thinking about g5 and Bh3. The Nh7 move would be pertinent to address that possibility but its merits need a lot of analysis.
Apr-22-13  Everett: < RookFile: I'm sure Kasparov was thinking about g5 and Bh3. The Nh7 move would be pertinent to address that possibility but its merits need a lot of analysis.>

Yep, kind of like the merits of g5 and Bh3 would need to be analyzed.

Mar-25-15  RookFile: Andy Soltis remarked that it is permissible to give yourself a bad bishop if in the meantime you get active play with your rooks.
Jun-24-16  Joker2048: This is so bad for me that my opponent offering me draw in a winning position. Poor karpov..:O:O:O:O:O:
Nov-20-16  Grbasowski: A game for the money.
Nov-20-16  Grbasowski: It's
a clear win for Kasparov.
The stalinist (putinist) trash
Karpov had to resign!
Disgusting!
Oct-04-17  dannygjk: Game* 24
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