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Garry Kasparov vs Anatoly Karpov
Kasparov - Karpov World Championship Match (1990), New York, NY USA, rd 10, Nov-03
Russian Game: Modern Attack. Center Attack (C43)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Apr-29-03  MissGambit: Hello... Pretty new to the game. Can someone explain this draw to me??? I've seen a few like this... are both players convinced that the game can go no further without their own position being ruined or... what? Draws like this confuse me.
Apr-29-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: This is what's usually called a "GM draw." Both players have played memorized moves which are part of opening theory to arrive at a position which is judged to be about equal.

Rather than play on, these lazy bums decide to go home early for the day. It's as if they are saying "We are such incredibly great players, and we NEVER make mistakes, if we played on from this dry position it would just be a waste of time."

The "GM Draw" is a relatively new phenominon. You won't see GM draws in the old games (Capablanca and Morphy never participated in this nonsense) and there are some more modern players (e.g. Fischer) that will always fight until the end.

Apr-29-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  lostemperor: Hi. Well I think neither site has a (reasonable) chance of winning, only if one makes a (terrible) mistake. Black plays 18...Ne7 There can follow 19. g5 Bc6 20. gxf6 gxf6 21. Be2 Rg8 22. Bc3 Rg2 23. Bxf6 Bf4+ 24. Kb1 Rxf2 and equal although you are right it would be interesting if they played it

Thats why I mostly stick to gambits (my friends also call me MrGambit :). Lots of play (and only draw if two kings left)!

Apr-29-03  Malacha: Sneaky,I've never heard a better description of a grandmaster draw than the one you gave here.As far as I'm concerned that is exactly what they amount to.Two perfect players that are beyond mistakes,saying "what's the point of wasting our time".
Apr-29-03  ughaibu: Capablanca played plenty of grandmaster draws, so did Alekhine. Wasn't Fischer the first to break the rule that he himself had got FIDE to introduce to prevent short draws?
Apr-29-03
Premium Chessgames Member
  lostemperor: I don't think this is a deliberate draw since it is a worldchampionshipmatch with only 12 white games for each. One have to play for a win with white to begin with. I think Kasparov tried 1. e4 and got the Petrov-defense but found out Karpov was well prepared. So he went for the draw and prepare better next time. In a tournament a GM-draw is more likely to happen.
Apr-29-03  Bears092: ...for GMs, Chess is how they make a living, and taking an early draw could often help them earn money for their troubles. If someone at the non-professional level started making draws like this, then I'd be worried...
Jun-17-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Karpov's novelty was 8...Nf5. Kasparov couldn't refute it over the board and black got an easy draw. But presumably someone has come up with something better since then - otherwise everyone would be playing the Petroff as black! Anyone know what the refutation is?
Jun-17-04  acirce: As for Sneaky's nonsense about Capablanca never playing "GM draws", http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches...

<Bears092> It happens all the time at club level.

Jun-17-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Too right! In fact this one: Rubinstein vs Capablanca, 1922 caused such a kerfuffle that Capablanca had to make a load of apologies in print about it; everyone had come along especially to see his game against Rubinstein and the game was over before it began!
Jun-17-04  acirce: About this game: 15...a6 was a mistake that should have been answered 16. Bxc6 Bxc6 17. Rhe1 Bxe4 18. Rxe4 Nd6 19. Re2 intending Nd4-e6 according to Jangjava's book on the Petrov. 15...Nd6 is given as the best move with equality. 8...Nf5 does look like it gives White trouble to achieve an edge which makes it hard to explain why this line isn't more popular nowadays.
Sep-30-04  Dillinger: "The game was an 18 move draw which angered the spectators, some of whom had paid 100 US$ for the best seats. Since each game was worth 125.000 US$, the spectators expected more from the players." http://www.mark-weeks.com/chess/90k...
Dec-12-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: There seems to be a better way of playing white here, Oral vs A Neiksans, 1999. The gist of it is 9.Nb5.
Jun-30-09  Knight13: <Sneaky: Rather than play on, these lazy bums decide to go home early for the day. It's as if they are saying "We are such incredibly great players, and we NEVER make mistakes, if we played on from this dry position it would just be a waste of time."> I don't think they would reach GM level if they were lazy.

(disregard that) I know what you mean! :-)

Jun-30-09  talisman: that mouse is everywhere!
Jun-23-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Dillinger: "The game was an 18 move draw which angered the spectators, some of whom had paid 100 US$ for the best seats. Since each game was worth 125.000 US$, the spectators expected more from the players." http://www.mark-weeks.com/chess/90k...

LOL - that is their tough toenails for paying a Big Benny to see a chess game! They should have been in Danvers State Hospital, Mass., not wandering around at liberty in the World Trade Centre, a danger to themselves and others.

I'd never pay more than $90 to see two guys play chess.

Jun-29-17  nummerzwei: <acirce: About this game: 15...a6 was a mistake that should have been answered 16. Bxc6 Bxc6 17. Rhe1 Bxe4 18. Rxe4 Nd6 19. Re2 intending Nd4-e6 according to Jangjava's book on the Petrov. 15...Nd6 is given as the best move with equality. 8...Nf5 does look like it gives White trouble to achieve an edge which makes it hard to explain why this line isn't more popular nowadays.>

Gutman proposes 11.Bd2 with the idea of playing Ne5 in some lines.

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