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Viktor Korchnoi vs Anatoly Karpov
Karpov - Korchnoi Candidates Final (1974), Moscow URS, rd 19, Nov-04
Trompowsky Attack: Classical Defense. Big Center Variation (A45)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-27-11  King Death: <AVRO38> As a practical matter, it's true, but Fischer was still recognized as champion by FIDE.
Nov-27-11  AVRO38: <As a practical matter, it's true, but Fischer was still recognized as champion by FIDE.>

That's really irrelevant since Fischer already resigned. Richard Nixon also resigned in 1974, are you suggesting that unless people accept his resignation he is still president?

People have a right to resign whatever position they hold, be it President of the U.S., World Chess Champion, or an employee in a company. Whether or not the resignation is accepted is irrelevant.

Nov-27-11  King Death: <AVRO38> Nixon's resignation was legally binding. This wasn't.
Nov-27-11  AVRO38: <Nixon's resignation was legally binding. This wasn't.>

That's why I said: "FIDE held out hope against hope until 1975 that Fischer would reverse his decision but he never did."

That's the whole point. The decision was never reversed i.e. the title was vacant at the time of this match. You can't just ignore Fischer's resignation and carry on as if it didn't happen.

Nov-27-11  King Death: I suppose I could ignore <AVRO>, but that would give him an importance he doesn't deserve.
Nov-27-11  Marmot PFL: For a long time players thought the way to beat Karpov was to play offbeat lines to get him out of his preparation. Miles win with 1 e4 a6 probably had a lot to do with that.
Nov-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Marmot PFL: For a long time players thought the way to beat Karpov was to play offbeat lines to get him out of his preparation. Miles win with 1 e4 a6 probably had a lot to do with that.>

They should have looked at all the other games where Miles played something offbeat against Karpov.

Nov-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <AVRO38> I am grieved, worthless troll. Fischer page, December 10, 2010. Alekhine, Botvinnik, chessmetrics.
Nov-28-11  Petrosianic: <I am grieved, worthless troll. Fischer page, December 10, 2010. Alekhine, Botvinnik, chessmetrics.>

Have you ever heard the expression "You can't get blood out of a turnip"? A worthless troll is not going to post something worthwhile just because you ask him to. If he could do that, he'd have done it without prodding long ago, and spared himself a lot of embarrassment. That Ignore feature is there for a reason, you know.

Nov-28-11  Everett: <keypusher> <And yes, Ilye Figler crushed me. But he was a very pleasant man, as well as a terrific chessplayer, so I was happy to upload the game.>

An excellent show of class. Thanks for that game, yet, even moreso, thanks for pointing out that chess is not all about wins and losses.

Nov-28-11  Shams: Playing "der Geier" against a master takes some moxie, good on ya <kp>.
Nov-28-11  Everett: <keypusher>

<They should have looked at all the other games where Miles played something offbeat against Karpov.>

Too true. Miles got smashed properly quite often.

Nov-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Wow. White is Δ rather mate or win of the ♕.
Nov-28-11  Blunderdome: Oh, Korchnoi.
Nov-29-11  Petrosianic: Actually, it's V. Korchnoi.
Jul-15-12  Albion 1959: This was a really good tussle, I have not had time to look at it depth, but did Karpov have to play 50. Rxc6+? Or am I missing something here? A difficult endgame that probably did not get accurate treatment from both sides:
Sep-08-12  tympsa: Jude Acer wrote about this game in November 1974 :

Moscow 1974 rages out of control now. During game 19, November 4-5, Karpov made a serious mistake in etiquette. He was leading by a precious three whole games against Korchnoi with only 6 games to go. He should have been serving lunch, coffee and amenities to Korchnoi. He should have sent him his personal limousine to fetch Korchnoi to the games. He should have been absolutely proper. Instead he stared into Korchnoi's face while he was deep in thought.

Korchnoi keeps a thermos of tea prepared by Bella near the board. He watches this thermos to be certain that nobody puts anything into it as Spassky probably was drugged in Iceland. (Honest!)

As Korchnoi looked up to check on thermos bottle, he noticed Karpov's eyes blazing away as if to hypnotize him! He called the referee over (Alberic O’Kelly of Belgium) and asked that Karpov be instructed to quit staring into his eyes! O'Kelley agreed with Korchnoi and made the request.

Now furious Karpov asked that the Korchnoi thermos bottle be moved off stage! And so on, so on At this hour war is on in Moscow because Korchnoi defeated Karpov by angrily continuing a very drawish endgame until the equally angry Karpov made a very simple error, allowing a Korchnoi pawn to race towards promotion after two agonizing days of struggle. What a match! Karpov still heavily favored as we go to press, but if it goes to 3-2 ... maybe ... maybe.

May-20-14  Conrad93: The hypermodern school was actually created in the 1920's, AVRO.

Yes, the Queen's Indian, KID, and Nimzo-Indian can be traced all the way back to the 19th century, but they were rarely played and were not all that well understood.

It was mostly Indian players who played these lines, because they were used to the Indian version of chess where such moves were the norm.

That doesn't mean they were following the hypermodern philosophy of Nimzowitsch, Bogoljubov, Reti, and Alekhine.

It was merely a coincidence.

May-22-14  N0B0DY: No kidding?
May-22-14  Caissanist: Although Fischer did announce that he was resigning his title, nobody took that seriously. Including, as it happens, Fischer himself; he continued to claim that he was world champion until at least 1992, when he insisted during his match with Spassky that banners be hung saying it was a world championship match.

This was not the first time that a world champion had tried to resign his title. Emanuel Lasker attempted to resign his title in 1920, in favor of Capablanca. Nobody took that seriously either, and Lasker was eventually convinced to play the match with Capablanca the following year.

May-22-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <Caisanist> I think that most everybody took Fischer's resignation of his title seriously, even if FIDE continued to try to convince him to continue the negotiations. And Fischer technically said "... FIDE has decided against my participation in the 1975 World Chess Championship. I therefore resign my <FIDE> World Championship title."

I think that in his mind he made a distinction between the "World Championship title" and the "FIDE World Championship title". The "World Championship title" was the chess title determined by a match arranged between the defending champion and his challenger. The "FIDE World Championship title" was the chess title administered by FIDE in whatever format they determined. Thus, Fischer could claim, at least in his mind, that the 1992 "World Championship title" match with Spassky was the legitimate World Chess Championship title and not the titles determined by FIDE's regulations.

And I think that people also took Lasker's attempted resignation of his title in favor of Capablanca seriously. One difference is that in 1920 there was no FIDE or other body to administer the title, so it was left to the champion to determine the challenger. So it could be argued that the title was the champion's to do with as he pleased, subject to the opinion of the chess world. For more on the subject, see http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/....

May-23-14  Petrosianic: <AylerKupp>: <I think that in his mind he made a distinction between the "World Championship title" and the "FIDE World Championship title".>

That is exactly what he did. His mistake was in thinking that he had won some other world title than the FIDE one that he could retain. But there wasn't. When he resigned the FIDE Title, he resigned everything.

Lasker also resigned his title successfully. It's ridiculous to think someone can't resign a title. That they're in whether they like to or not, like the mob. In Lasker's mind, he played Capa as the challenger. In the eyes of the world, they allowed him to retract his resignation. Had Fischer played in good time, they probably would have allowed him to do the same. 18 years later they didn't.

<The "World Championship title" was the chess title determined by a match arranged between the defending champion and his challenger. The "FIDE World Championship title" was the chess title administered by FIDE in whatever format they determined. Thus, Fischer could claim, at least in his mind, that the 1992 "World Championship title" match with Spassky was the legitimate World Chess Championship title and not the titles determined by FIDE's regulations.>

By that thinking, Gene Tunney was World Heavyweight Boxing Champion at age 81. He wasn't. He retired undefeated, as did Fischer, but he didn't take the title with him into retirement, in any sense of the word.

Nov-18-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <Caissanist: Although Fischer did announce that he was resigning his title, nobody took that seriously. Including, as it happens, Fischer himself; he continued to claim that he was world champion until at least 1992, when he insisted during his match with Spassky that banners be hung saying it was a world championship match.

This was not the first time that a world champion had tried to resign his title. Emanuel Lasker attempted to resign his title in 1920, in favor of Capablanca. Nobody took that seriously either, and Lasker was eventually convinced to play the match with Capablanca the following year.>

And Lasker proceeded to resign that match before losing the requisite number of games

Nov-18-17  Howard: This may be a picky point, but in Fischer's well-known cablegram to FIDE in 1974, he stated he was resigning his "FIDE world championship title".

In other words, he almost certainly meant he was resigning as the FIDE champion--but he no doubt considered himself to be still the world's best player, hands down.

Jan-10-19  woldsmandriffield: The key position arises after 65..Qc5+: White to play and win.

Korchnoi's excellent 66 Kb3! is the only way.

a) 66 Kd2? Qa5+! 67 Kc1 (67 Ke2 Qh5+) Qa1+

b) 66 Kb2? Qe5+ 67 Kc2 Kh2

c) 66 Qc4? Qxc4+

This would make a good daily puzzle.

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