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Viktor Korchnoi vs Anatoly Karpov
Karpov - Korchnoi World Championship Rematch (1981), Merano ITA, rd 9, Oct-24
Queen's Gambit Declined: Uhlmann Variation (D55)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-22-05  Brown: <Eggman> nice find, thanks for pointing that out.
Oct-08-05  LIFE Master AJ: (http://www.geocities.com/lifemaster...) Puzzle # 24.
Dec-25-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  KingG: Brilliant positional play by Karpov. Sometimes he makes isolated pawns look like decisive weaknesses for his opponent.
Nov-19-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I think we missed something!! The fork does NOT win! The win is executed by 44 ♔g1 ♖d1+ winning the queen Taking the rook would allow a perpetual check at f6 and f7 or regaining the rook with a capture at h6
Nov-19-06  Karpova: <kevin86: I think we missed something!! The fork does NOT win! The win is executed by 44 Kg1 Rd1+ winning the queen Taking the rook would allow a perpetual check at f6 and f7 or regaining the rook with a capture at h6>

That's nothing new. If Qa8: had been the reason for Korchnoi to resign Karpov would have taken the Rook already on move 42 (he played 42...Qc5+ instead)

Jan-15-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Octavia: game 18 in Mcdonald's "the art of logical thinking"
Jan-15-07  hitman84: Hi <Octavia>, kindly check your forum :)
Jan-19-07  MJW 72: I never liked Korchnoi's style. He cannot defend well he can only counter attack. He just sets complex problems and waits for his oppenent to do something stuiped. Well that did not work against Karpov. The only reason the Korchnoi had a chance against Karpov in the other matchs was becacause Karpov was lazy and over-confident. I like Kaspy and Karpov much better than Korchnoi and Fischer because the fromer tryed to outplay the oppenent. Not by taking no real risks, knowing all the opeings by heart, making complex postions by gutting their postion and waiting for the oppenent to do somethng stuiped and grind them down with good techinque.
Apr-11-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Knight13: <He just sets complex problems and waits for his oppenent to do something stuiped..... matchs was becacause Karpov was lazy and over-confident. I like Kaspy and Karpov much better than Korchnoi and Fischer because the fromer tryed to outplay the oppenent.> Since when did people win games because they outplay the other guy? We all know that chess games are won/lost because someone "does something stupid" and the other guy "sees it and knows how to execute it." Outplay or waiting for mistake it's the same thing. Whatever suits Korchnoi's style. Hell, I'll just "set up complex problems and wait for opponent to trip up" if I can become one of world's top 5 players like Korchnoi.
Nov-27-08  M.D. Wilson: Agreed, it has served Korchnoi well.
Mar-24-10  fab4: Korchnoi was a joke in this match. In 1981 this 50 year old man was the oppositon for Karpov lol.. 30.f4 is an awful and ugly positional move.

Nobody around then..Fischer becoming a recluse and a naescent Kasparov around the corner..

Aug-28-10  echever7: <fab4: Korchnoi was a joke in this match. In 1981 this 50 year old man was the oppositon for Karpov lol.. 30.f4 is an awful and ugly positional move.> Yes Korchnoi was not so good in this match. But this game is rather an extraordinary acomplishment by Karpov. 30.f4 is ugly, yes. But how stop black's e5? he problem was more profound than just missing one move. Korchnoi was completely outplayed by Karpov in this game. and according to Karpov after 34..Qe8!! white cannot stop black for occupying the second rank.
Jun-04-12  Anderssen99: Karpov considered this game one of his best ten ever.
Jun-04-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: One of my favourites as well.

Here is a really enlightening passage of play.


click for larger view

Karpov has just played 29...Qd7 and is threatening to play 30...e5, which would win that dastardly white d-pawn. There aren't many ways to prevent that so Korchnoi played a move that at least might lead to some future counterplay: 30.f4.


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Karpov sees that in some variations black can win the d-pawn only for white to capture the pawn on b7 at the end, reestablishing material equality. So he plays 30...b6


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Korchnoi plays a move that protects the d-pawn from the side, 31.Rb4:


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And now Karpov plays a move that shattered Korchnoi to the roots of his boots and spread alarm and despondency throughout the chess world, causing screams of indignation from every right-thinking chessplayer on the globe: 31...b5!


click for larger view

Yes - a rare two-consecutive-single-step of a pawn.

The threat is 32...a5. The only move for white is then 33.Rb3, but then 33...b4 causes a Tunguska-like catastrophe on white's d4 square.


click for larger view

Just one of the seven million stories from the Karpov-Korchnoi games.

Feb-21-13  Howard: Not mentioned in the myriad of comments (so far) is that Karpov's 7...dxc4 was actually tied for first place in Informant 32 as the most significant opening novelty for the second half of 1981. According to Kasparov (MGP V), the real point of that move becomes apparent with 11...Nh5 ! Any comments on this ?
Oct-14-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Zhbugnoimt: 19.Rxc6 seems to draw easily for white. Why didn't Korch play it?
Jul-08-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  sbevan: <Zhbugnoimt: 19.Rxc6 seems to draw easily for white. Why didn't Korch play it?>

John Watson in Vol 1 of "Mastering the Chess Openings" analyzes this. You're correct according to Watson iff 19.... Nxd6
20. d5 exd5
21. Bxd5

However if 19...bxc6! Watson gives a paragraph of written analysis to show that W is worse. Amongst other reasons Watson gives this (as an example) the c6 P prevents the isolani from advancing.

So I guess that's why VK didn't play it.

Jul-08-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  sbevan: Another comment from IM Watson on this game.

He writes after 21...Rb6!

"From this point on Karpov plays one the best technical games in world championship history."

Aug-06-15  Howard: Why was Karpov's 7...dxc4 such a strong novelty ?! The Informant actually designated it as one of the 3-4 strongest novelties of Volume 32 !

But what was so great or profound about that move ?!

Aug-06-15  Olavi: <Howard> I'm afraid your question is impossible to answer here. It requires a good number of pages, one needs to know the history of the variation. Just a glance at the relevant games in Kasparov's OMGP series indicates so, and I know many important games are missing there. So it's a question of how it compares with other moves, with their long variations.

But there's a simpler way of looking at it. It wasn't played previously because it seems to lose a clear tempo compared to the lines with Bf1-d3xc4. Rc1 is obviously good to have. But the tactical justification 8.e4 Nc6! 9.Bxc4 (9.e5 is better) Nxe4! had not been noticed. And when white plays 8.e3, then black doesn't need to put his knight on d7, it goes to c6, and that has been seen to compensate for the tempo.

Aug-06-15  Howard: Granted, Kasparov's MGP does analyze that move, but not in too great detail.

The novelty was repeated in Game 17, by the way, but that ended in a draw.

After Game 17 came...Game 18. And most of us know what happened in that one !

Thanks for your comments, by the way.

Aug-06-15  Olavi: The older move 7... b6 is analyzed in connection with other games - Petrosian - Portisch, I think. It's also fully playable; 7...dxc4 gives no winning chances if white isn't overambitious, so also Karpov used 7...b6 later.

It's the staggering simplicity of 7...dxc4 that is so much appreciated, I think, in a position where it was considered bad.

Oct-09-17  Howard: Just looked at the CL issue from early 1982 which analyzed this particular game.

It stated that according to Najdorf, 7...dxc4 had probably never been tried before up until then.

Just a bit hard to believe. It looks like a fairly obvious move, and it's surprising that no one had previously given it a go.

But, hey, Karpov won a very good game here!

Oct-09-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Howard> I undertook the radical expedient of checking Opening Explorer. Forintos played 7....dxc4 back in 1962, but missed the key ...Nc6 followup.

Portisch vs G Forintos, 1962

There are fewer examples of the position after 7.Rc1 than you might expect; usually White plays e2-e3 earlier.

There are more comprehensive databases out that there I haven't checked.

Oct-10-17  Howard: And, according to Kasparov's MGP, 7...dxc4 was tried in at least a few subsequent games post-1981. Don't know though if that move has, perhaps, been superseded by a different one.
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