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Yasser Seirawan vs Anatoly Karpov
Haninge (1990), Haninge SWE, rd 2, May-??
English Opening: King's English Variation. General (A20)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Given 10 times; par: 67 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Mar-12-06  zev22407: A gambit play by Seirawan in a position that looks dull.After some complication he wins matirial and than we have another tacticll fight.
Apr-20-06  Amphryxia: Apparently Karpov ran desperately short on time around the tenth move. If I remember correctly, Karpov had about 5 minutes left at move 17.
Oct-29-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  valiant: Robert Byrne in The New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/1990/06/12/n...

<Karpov tried to escape the pressure with 10 . . . Bb4 11 Bb2 Bd5, but Seirawan struck a powerful blow to open the position with 12 e4! Now, 12 . . . Be4? 13 O-O-O Ke7 14 Ne4 fe 15 Ne5 Nf6 16 a3 Ba5 17 Nc4 Bc7 18 Rhe1 is positionally powerful for White.

Karpov decided that the best chance for counterplay was to give up the exchange with 12 . . . ef 13 O-O-O Bc3 14 Bc3 ef 15 Be5 Nd7 16 Bh8 and, as a practical matter, he was surely right. But whether that was enough to draw the game was quite another matter.>

Mar-02-11  Kinghunt: After the game, both Karpov and Seirawan were quite critical of 6...c6. Apparently, Karpov thought their line was simply transposing to another, known line, where c6 was often played, but Seirawan prevented this, leaving Karpov stuck in an inferior variation.
Feb-19-12  nelech: is the final position really won for white ?
Feb-19-12  King Death: <nelech> White's better at the end with the exchange for a pawn but Black seems to have drawing chances after 36...Rf5 37.Rg4 (to stop ...a4) b6 38.Rh1 Be6. This must have been a loss on time.
Mar-16-12  Everett: This game is so choppy and uneven I'm having a tough time including it in Seirawan's Excellent Games.

On the other hand, it is a great demonstration of Karpov's ability to fight on in the crappiest of positions...

Mar-11-13  LivBlockade: Here's an interesting video of GM Seirawan showing this game in a lecture at the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yn...
Mar-11-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: FWIW: I got Seirawan beating Karpov 10-times in his career; while Karpov beat Seirawan 13-times
Aug-05-16  mandor: Seirawan pointed out that with g3 and g6, the position without queens, passed from favourable to black, to favourable to white (in this game, white avoids that black king catches c7, and take advantage of leading developement and the weak Rh8 ..) Nice commentaries by the winner : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yn...
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