chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

There are 5 clues unsolved right now on the Holiday Contest Clues Page!   [Official Contest Rules]
(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Evgeni Ellinovich Sveshnikov vs Garry Kasparov
47th Soviet Championship (1979), Minsk URS, rd 2, Nov-30
Sicilian Defense: Alapin Variation. Smith-Morra Declined (B22)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 23 times; par: 77 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 2 more Sveshnikov/Kasparov games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can learn a lot about this site (and chess in general) by reading the Chessgames Help Page. If you need help with premium features, please see the Premium Membership Help Page.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Jul-03-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: 35.Bxc5? was a bad mistake as the pawn ending is obviously lost, 35.Be1 should have hold as there is no longer any visible way to penetrate. 33..g6? was a mistake from Kasparov's side according to Dvoretsky: <The pawn should have been left on g7, in order to support the undermining with f7-f6! The right way to obtain a zugzwang was by making a waiting move with the bishop. 33..Ba5! 34.Ke2 (after 34.a3!? followed by b3-b4, Black could also have tried for the win with the undermining f7-f6 and a6-a5) 34..Ke4 35.Bc5 f6! (undermining!) 36.exf6 gxf6. Black continues by getting his bishop to c7 (or on 37.Bd6 - to b6), his king to f5, and playing e6-e5 with a great and probably decisive advantage.>
Jul-18-04  ArturoRivera: A nice victory with the sicilian, perfect endgame technique, totally agree with acirce, the paawn ending was lost to black after the bishop's exchange, and an unmerciful zusgwang was comming.
Apr-12-07  Orion Sphere: I had to play this out to see how kasparov won an apparently drawish endgame and at the end of course he either wins a pawn on a2 or if axb retains the opposition and eats all the kingside pawns. Great win without a kingside attack or complex tactic, just a better king position.
Jul-13-09  totololo: This game doesn't remember the Capablanca's style? A better King position was enough for win... Of course Dvoretsky is right and the ending technique was not yet perfect...

In the first title match he will learn from Karpov that the road is more difficult then he expected... but once the lesson was learnt the teacher was in trouble...

This shows the great capacity to adapt that champions have...

Aug-27-09  timhortons:


click for larger view

evaluation after white exchange bishop...
1. (-1.63): 35...Kxc5
2. (5.32): 35...Ke4 36.Bf2

<33..g6? was a mistake from Kasparov's side according to Dvoretsky: >

i tried to run it with rybka, rybka yellow light flash after 33..g6


click for larger view

wow such ending as this could be played perfectly but even the great master such as these two cant play it perfect.

Aug-27-09  timhortons: 1979 ..garry must be young then...
Dec-05-17  Poisonpawns: Instead of g6(which is O.k) 33..Bc5 puts white in zugzwang right away.Since white can`t trade bishops without losing. 34.Be1 is forced.Black plays b4!; case closed. White king has to move back allowing Ke4 and moving the bishop loses the pawns on K-side.
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
6.5 33....g6
from Techniques of Positional Play 45 Practical Metho by Del ToRo
6.5 33....g6
from Techniques of Positional Play 45 Practical Metho by takchess
Black Sicilian B22 Anti-Morra
by Koshevarov
98_B22_Alapin Sillycian 2.c3
by whiteshark
Sicilian Alapin : Barmen
by ISeth
Sicilian B22
by Leszek
Chapter 4 (White to play, move 35)
from Shereshevsky's Endgame Strategy by hms123
Sicilian Defense: Alapin Variation. Smith-Morra Declined
from MKD's Sicilian Defense Black Compiled by MKD by fredthebear
Andreiko's favorite games
by Andreiko
Mikhail Shereshevsky's Endgame Strategy
by Inlandmoon
2 5
from parties de la prépa de thom by elo1xxx
Alapin Chigoryn
by Adoryn
senakash's favorite games mini
by senakash
Sicilian 2.c3
by Xmas elf
29p_PAWN endgames
by whiteshark
Sicilian Defense: Alapin Variation. Smith-Morra Declined
from MKD's Sicilian Defense Black by MKD
USSR Championship 1979
by suenteus po 147
masthan07's favorite games
by masthan07
Mikhail Shereshevsky's Endgame Strategy
by Atsa
a Kasparov collection
by obrit
plus 16 more collections (not shown)


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2018, Chessgames Services LLC