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Garry Kasparov vs Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian
"Weathering The Storm" (game of the day Feb-09-06)
Tilburg (07) (1981)  ·  Queen's Gambit Accepted: Janowski-Larsen Variation (D25)  ·  0-1
To move:
Last move:

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Given 45 times; par: 54 [what's this?]

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find similar games 4 more Kasparov/Petrosian games
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 8 OF 8 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-13-10  BillTaylor10: oh what hot damn.. kasparov is the greatest ever you imbeciles
Sep-15-10  babamjan: <BillTaylor10> being an armenian myself i hate to be the bearer of bad news but i gotta tell u it doesn't appear so in this game though.
Sep-15-10  fab4: This game leaves a funny impression. Like an old gunfighter/sheriff dealing with a young gunslinging upstart by holding him down on the head whilst the upstart is swinging and thrashing wildly at him. lol
Nov-12-10  Tigranny: How would a match between Tigran and Kasparov be like?
Aug-06-11  HOTDOG: 36.Bxc7! bxc4 37.Rb7! Rxc7 38.Rxa6+ Rxa6 39.Qb5+ Kd6 40.Qxa6+ Ke7 41.Bxd5 Rxb7 42.Bxb7 Qb8 43.Kf2 =
Dec-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  brankat: A brilliant game by Petrosian!
Dec-14-11  RookFile: I appreciate the fact the Petrosian castled queenside. Let's see, Kassparov has the bishop on g2 lined up against b7, with an a4 and b5 possibility - I'll just castle right into that. Pretty unbelievable, I think.
Mar-11-12  lopezexchange: Tigranny: It would have been a Petrosian victory by a wide margin. Perfect defense vs speculative attacks give the edge to the defense. Similar to Kramnik Kasparov match, but wider margin.
Mar-11-12  ewan14: Petrosian had certainly taken his iron tablets that day ! !
Mar-11-12  eyalbd: Petrosian had formidable tactical ability and all his rivals knew that very well. Fischer once said that if Petrosian had adopted tactical style no one could feel safe against him.

We see it here. Young Kasparov tried to mate the Tiger but was outsmarted in his own playground.

Fischer got some free lessons too, and eventually could overcome Petrosian only by simple and positional chess (years 1970-1971)

Apr-05-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: I agree with <Rookfile> about the Queenside castling. Quickly playing through the game that just jumped off the board at me. What was Petrosian thinking? "Let's see. His Bishop and Queen are staring down the diagonals toward the Queenside, he can push his a and b Pawns, it's Kasparov. Meh, why not? 0-0-0"
Apr-05-12  King Death: < kamalakanta: <Travis Bickle: Fischer beat the hell out of Petrosian and Petro squashed Kaspy like a bug. Hmm = Fischer is The greatest Player of all time!!!> ...and Geller had a plus score against Fischer. That makes Geller the best player of all time!>

But Spassky had a plus score against Geller. I guess Spassky was the greatest. Then there's the fact that Spassky was minus against Botvinnik, so Mikhail Moiseevich must be even greater.

Apr-05-12  Penguincw: Impressive. Petrosian's defence is no match for Kasparov's attack.
Apr-05-12  maelith: The young Kasparov learned from this game, and in their later game Kasparov beat Petrosian in impressive fashion..
Apr-05-12  ephesians: <Penquincw: Impressive. Petrosian's defence is no match for Kasparov's attack. >

Petrosian won this game. Does that represent a problem to this theory?

Apr-06-12  Penguincw: < ephesians: <Penquincw: Impressive. Petrosian's defence is no match for Kasparov's attack. >

Petrosian won this game. Does that represent a problem to this theory? >

Oops. For some reason, I thought it was 1-0.

Jun-05-12  yiotta: Petrosian was the "What, me worry?" player of all times. He had tremendous confidence in his defensive abilities. A uniquely entertaining player. Talk about "Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee."
Aug-04-12  rannewman: I realy like 19...f5! took me some time to understand it (well, I hope I did). If 20.g:f g:f 21.Q:e6 f5! 22.Bd5 Nf8! 23.Qf7 Rh7! (the immidiate C:d5 doesn't work due to 24 Qg7)and now if 24. Qg8 then C:d5 traps the queen, even if it takes severl moves just to attack her!
Jul-22-13  Chessman1504: Certainly one of Petrosian's best efforts, and at the age of 52! He excellently defends against the aggressive Kasparov. 35.Kc6!! is one neat move that many(read: most) would not have considered!
Jul-24-13  SmokyRic3: i came across this game just now after reading the black player's surname Petrosian against the white Kasparov. I have been a fan of Petrosian eventhou his past positional masterpiece games was marred by tragic oversights, from his games i've learned how to play positionally by about 80%
Sep-17-13  Andrijadj: After this game, Kasparov asked Spassky for advice how to beat Petrosian. The response was: "You need to get him by one ball, not two. If you get him by both balls he gets angry and kills you".

:)

Sep-17-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  DWINS: <Andrijadj>, According to Kasparov, the exact quote is, “He counseled me that the key was to apply pressure, but just a little, steadily. ‘Squeeze his balls,’ he told me in an unforgettable turn of phrase. ‘But just squeeze one, not both!’”
Feb-03-14  torrefan: 35...Kc6--not very often that the <King> is used to <attack> in a middlegame.
Apr-16-14  Lonnie Lurko: <artemis: In Volume 3 of OMGP, Kasparov gives this game with Petrosian as an example of a lesson he had learned from the ex world champion. Here are some of his comments on various moves.....

33. Bb4?
Strangely enough, this natural move, building up the pressure is a serious mistake. .....

35. ... Kc6!!
A fantastic defense! This move, which Petrosian made instantly threw me into complete confusion: how is it possible to move the king forward with a board full of pieces?!>

Ah, "move the king forward with a board full of pieces". Anybody tried Googling that phrase?

Curiously we get Ray Keene's chess column for 28 October 2012 in the Times, annotating a game Kasparov-Timman from Tilburg 1991. White's 32nd is deecribed thus:

"This natural move, building up pressure, is a mistake"

and Black's 35th in similarly familiar terms:

"Another fantastic defensive move. It is astonishing that it is possible to move the king forward with a board full of pieces."

Should we also find time to look at Ray's Little Book of Chess Secrets on Amazon, and enter the word "astonishing" in the Search Inside This Book box...

...well, astonishing.

Apr-16-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <DWINS: <Andrijadj>, According to Kasparov, the exact quote is, “He counseled me that the key was to apply pressure, but just a little, steadily. ‘Squeeze his balls,’ he told me in an unforgettable turn of phrase. ‘But just squeeze one, not both!’”>

Lovely stuff, which recalls the classic Amarillo Slim quote: 'You can shear a sheep many a time, but you can only skin him once'.

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Kasparov on Kasparov: Part I
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