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Paul Keres vs Samuel Reshevsky
First Piatigorsky Cup (1963), Los Angeles, CA USA, rd 11, Jul-21
Spanish Game: Closed. Averbakh Variation (C87)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 26.Qd2
<RJF> <<> White is apparently somewhat stunned by Black's last move and meekly retreats, after which his game becomes completely lost. best was 26.bxc4 Bb4 27.c3 Bxa5 28.c5! If now 28...Bxb6, then 29.Rb1, or if 28...d4 29.cxd4 Bxe1 30.Rxe1, White has fair chances with his center Pawns.<>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: Insert <RJF> <<> Very pretty. <>> in between the last two notes.
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 28...Bb3 <RJF> <<> Reshevsky's play from here on with his 40th move could hardly be improved.<>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 29.Rb1 <RJF> <<> If 29.Rc1 d3, threatening 30...Bc2; followed by 31...Rd4 or 31...Qe7, winning easily.<>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: Here's where we hit a snag in Bobby's analysis. It was annotated in good old English Descriptive Notation, but the note contains a typo. Here's how it looks after 30.Bc7:


click for larger view

<RJF> <<> Clever but futile. But there was no really good defense. 30.Q-N2?, is of course useless after 30...BxP!; followed by 31...B-B6; etc. Best for White seems 30.Q-N2, but after 30...B-B5!; Black maintains his advantage. <>>

Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 31...f5 <RJF> <<> Reshevsky drives home his advantage with admirable precision. <>>

After 32.Qd3 <RJF> <<> 32.f3 should have been tried anyway. If 32.exf5 of course 32...Qf4! etc. <>>

Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: Position after 34.Qxe4:


click for larger view

Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 37.Qd3 <RJF> <<> Black threatened 37...d3; if 37 Nc4 Qd5; etc. <>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 40.Rb5 <RJF> <<> A last trick. Black threatened 40...d3 again, and there was no good defense. If 40.Na4 Bb4; etc. or 40.Qd3 a4; etc. <>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 40...Bb4 <RJF> <<> Reshevsky was most likely in time trouble. After 40...d3; White could resign with a clear conscience, since if 41. Rd5 Qxb6; or if 41.Rf5 Qxf5; etc. Now he must win the game all over again. <>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 42.Qd3 <RJF> <<> Best. If 42.Rb6 Bc5 43.Ra6 a4 is hopeless. <>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 43.f3 <RJF> <<>Black threatened 43...Rxd5. <>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: Position after 43...Bd2:


click for larger view

<RJF> <<> Very good. 43...Bf8 would allow 44.Nf4, with Rh5 in store.<>>

Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 44...Qe8 <RJF> <<> 44...Qc3 would allow 45.Qf5 (not Qxh7+??).<>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 47...d3: <RJF> <<> This second mistake should have thrown the win away altogether. Correct was 47...Bh6, followed by 48...g6 and 49...Bg7. If 47...a3 would also be a draw only after 48.Nf6! gxf6 (48...Qg6? 49.Rc8 wins or 48...g6 49.Rc7, etc.) 49.Qxf6+ Kg8 50.Rc7 (50...Qf8 51.Qe6+ Kh8 52.Qe5+, draws by perpetual.) 50...Rd7 51.Qc6 Rd8 52.Qf6, draws by perpetual.<>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 48.Rc3: <RJF> <<> 48.Nxe3 Qxe3 49.Rd5 would have regained the Pawn with an easy draw. For example: 49...Qe8 (Best: 49...Qe2+ would lead to nothing after 50.Kh3 Qe8 51.Rxd3 Ra8 52.Ra3) 50.Qe4! (Not 50.Qxd3 Ra8 51.Qa3? Qe2+ 52.Kg1 h6 53.Rc5 Rd8 54.Rc1 Kh7 and should win 55.Qxa4? Qe3+ etc.) 50...d2, best (50...a3 51.Rxd3 is easy) 51.Qxe8+ Rxe8 52.Rxd2 Ra8 53.Ra2, and the ending is still a long story; however, with correct play the draw is sure. White must not play to win the a-Pawn of course, but rather to block Black's King from entering into the White's K-side. 48.Nf6 would not do after 48...gxf6 49.Qxf6+ Kg8 50.Rg5+ (50.Rc7 Bd4) Bxg5 51.Qxg5+ Kf7 52.Qf5+ Ke7 53.Qe5+ Kd7 54.Qd5+ Kc7; Black escapes the perpetual.<>>
Mar-29-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  MarkThornton: Pardon my ignorance and probable spelling mistake, but is this a game from the First Piatagorsky Cup?

I have read the tournament book of the Second (and last, I think) Piatagorsky Cup, from 1966. As I recall, Spassky, Fischer and Larsen finished 1st, 2nd and 3rd.

But I know very little about the first tournament, other than it was an all-play-all, for top class GMs only. If anyone can tell me more about that tourney, I'd be glad to read it.

Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 51.Qe4: <RJF> <<> If 51.Qg5 Qe6+. <>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: <MarkThornton> Yes, this is from the First Piatigorsky Cup, but Fischer wasn't one of the players. Keres and Petrosian tied for first. The games can all be found here: Game Collection: First Piatigorsky Cup 1963 .
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: Position after 54.Nxd3:


click for larger view

After 54...Kg7 <RJF> <<> It's all over now and Reshevsky indulges in a little sport. Keres might as well have resigned now. The old story of Bishop vs. Knight with Pawns on both sides of the board, but more especially the outside passed Pawn, etc., etc., etc. <>>

Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 63...Bf2: <RJF> <<> Black simply forces 64.g4, then his King enters and picks off the K-side Pawns - the Bishop stops the e-Pawn. <>>
Mar-29-08  Resignation Trap: After 73...Kg3: <RJF> <<> The h-Pawn Queens! <>>
Mar-29-08  karik: Congratulations <Trap>, for the 4 year long project!
Mar-30-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  MarkThornton: Wikipedia has a good article about the two Piatigorsky Cup tournaments:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piatig...

Mar-30-08  who: <RT: Here's where we hit a snag in Bobby's analysis. It was annotated in good old English Descriptive Notation, but the note contains a typo. Here's how it looks after 30.Bc7: click for larger view
<RJF> <<> Clever but futile. But there was no really good defense. 30.Q-N2?, is of course useless after 30...BxP!; followed by 31...B-B6; etc. Best for White seems 30.Q-N2, but after 30...B-B5!; Black maintains his advantage. <>>>

The annotations to the first 30.Q-N2 (30.Q-N2 BxP!) seem spot on so the mistake must be in the second 30.Q-N2. I presume he was refering to 30.R-N2. It should probably read

<Clever but futile. But there was no really good defense. 30.Q-N2?, is of course useless after 30...BxP!; followed by 31...B-B6; etc. Best for White seems 30.R-N2, but after 30...B-B5!; Black maintains his advantage.>

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