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Jacob Henry Sarratt vs NN
"Que Sarratt Sarratt" (game of the day Mar-13-13)
Unknown (1818)  ·  King's Gambit: Accepted. Greco Gambit (C38)  ·  1-0
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Kibitzer's Corner
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Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Two other such games are Molinari vs Bordais, 1979 and S R Sharpe vs D S L Lenton, 1990.
Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <RookFile> <There are exceptions, but 90 percent of the time the bishop has no business being there in 1. e4 e5 setups.>

One very rare exception is the Tumbleweed Gambit. In my brief experience, Black's fianchettoed LSB makes life uncomfortable for White's King, who has drunkenly gambled away all his pawn shelter.

Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <perfidious> Yes. Remarkably, Chris W Baker went on to become an International Master.
Mar-13-13  Aniara: I always thought that 'Que sera sera' was French, but I just now learned from Wikipedia that this sentence is not grammatically correct in any language! 'Most Romance languages are like English in using a single word for the interrogative what (as in the question "What will it be?"): Spanish qué, Italian che, etc. But, for the "free relative" (non-interrogative) what (as in the assertion "What will be, will be"), unlike English, the Romance languages generally call for a two-word expression: Spanish lo que, Italian quello che, etc. (literally, "that which").' I suppose that it French, it would be 'Ce que sera, sera.'
Mar-13-13  FISCHERboy: My turn! 24. Bxd6 Kd8 25. Qb6 Kd7 26. Bxb5 Ke6 27. d5 nice combo.
Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: Here's the original...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZbK...

And here's a little digression...

In Ingerlund, it is something of a tradition for football supporters to sing during a football match. That's football as in feet and ball, not as in an excessive amount of padding with breaks every ten seconds to get your breath and have a little rest. Aaaah.

Some of these songs are, naturally, quite ... ahem ... boisterous. For example, it is not unknown for football fans to question the referee's parentage or personal hobbies or to tease the opposing side. But let's not go there. It's a family show.

One of the more amusing songs is "you're not singing any more". This is traditionally sung shortly after your side has scored a goal and the opposing fans are temporarily silent. Here is one version performed by a delightful troupe of young gentlemen (the flower of England's youth)...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNVS...

Anyhoo, the song "que sera sera" has been appropriated by teams who are performing quite well in a domestic cup competition. You see, the finals of the FA cup and League cup are traditionally held at Wembley stadium. Or as football fans know it, "Wemberlee". So if your team is doing well, or even has just won in the semi final, it is quite normal to burst out into a tuneful rendition of "que sera sera, whatever will be will be, we're going to Wemberlee..."

And if you can't quite picture the scene, try this ... (you might want to turn the volume down a little).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4Xz...

I know, I know. It's just another example of the cultural delights that Britain has given to a somewhat nonplussed world.

Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <patzer2> On your improvement for Black: <After 10... g4! 11. Nh2 f3 12. Bf4 fxg2 13. Kxg2 Nf6 , Black's position is better> While your idea of 10...g4 has to be better than 10...Bb7, White isn't forced to play 11.Nh2, but instead could offer a piece for accelerated development 'ala' a hybrid Muzio gambit: <11.Bxf4 gxf3 12.Rxf3> Black's awkward development offset the piece: Here, 13...Qxh4 is too risky; after 14.Nd2 Nf6 15.Raf1 White is pressuring the d & f pawns

The problem of White Queen pressuring Black Q-side from <b3> is found in a number of openings; for example, in the Q-pawn stonewall where Black's WSB deploys to <f5> followed by the pawn move <e6>, Qb3 can be annoying;

<RookFile> This comment is mostly true in general: <Bb7 in the opening was a bad move by black, as it usually is in double king pawn setups. There are exceptions, but 90 percent of the time the bishop has no business being there in 1. e4 e5 setups> The estimate of 90% may be debatable [ie: Archangel variation of the Ruy Lopez]; However, if this variation is 'out of fashion' at top level, then I would tend to agree with you

Mar-13-13  RookFile: It comes down to a basic question: who do you really believe is going to be doing the attacking? If the answer is white, then you need the b7 bishop to perform some useful defensive task. It may look pretty on b7, but if it is the only thing attacking white's king, the reality is that black is effectively a piece down on the kingside, where the white attacking action is taking place. The sounder black defenses find some way of either exchanging the problem c8 bishop for some minor piece of white's, or in shipping it to a square like f5 or g4. It may even be better to just leave the bishop on c8 a lot of times, rather than send it to b7. It seems too optimistic to base a defense around the idea that the problem c8 bishop is really the pride and joy of the black army.

These are general statements, of course, there are exceptions. Thanks.

Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <morfishine> There's also the Zaitsev Variation, for one: Opening Explorer I don't think it's at all unusual for Black to play ...Bb7 in a Ruy Lopez.
Mar-13-13  catlover: This was a fun game. As I recall, the phrase "Qué será, será" was a refrain in a song sung by Doris Day decades ago.
Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <catlover: ... As I recall, the phrase "Qué será, será" was a refrain in a song sung by Doris Day decades ago.>

Yup.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZbK... (video)

http://www.lyriczz.com/lyrics/doris... (lyrics)

From Wikipedia: <"Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)", first published in 1956, is a popular song written by the Jay Livingston and Ray Evans songwriting team. The song was introduced in the Alfred Hitchcock film The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), starring Doris Day and James Stewart in the lead roles.

Day's recording of the song for Columbia Records (catalog number 40704) made it to number two on the Billboard Hot 100 and number one in the UK Singles Chart. From 1968 to 1973, it was the theme song for the situation comedy The Doris Day Show, becoming her signature song. The three verses of the song progress through the life of the narrator – from childhood, to young adulthood and falling in love, to parenthood – and each asks "What will I be?" or "What lies ahead?" The chorus repeats the answer: "What will be will be." It reached the Billboard magazine charts in July 1956. The song received the 1956 Academy Award for Best Original Song with the alternative title "Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera)".> http://bit.ly/4AQrxq

Doris Day is 88. <In 2011, she released her 29th studio album My Heart, which debuted at #9 on the UK Top 40 charts. Day is the oldest artist to score a UK Top 10 with an album featuring new material.> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doris_...

Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Both sides get their blows in...but white gets the last laugh...with a sardonic pawn.
Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  waustad: It beat out "True Love" from "High Society" for best song that year. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CuP...
Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <FSR> No arguments here with this statement: <...I don't think it's at all unusual for Black to play ...Bb7 in a Ruy Lopez> Perhaps <RookFile> was thinking about KG, though he did say double e-pawn openings...Oh, and can't forget about the Zaitzev
Mar-13-13  RookFile: Let's look at two Zaitsev games. In the first, everything goes black's way, although Kasparov pulls out a draw:

Kasparov vs Karpov, 1990

In the 2nd, things go white's way:

Kasparov vs Karpov, 1990

My concern with the b7 development can be summarized by this position in the 2nd game:


click for larger view

Do you really want black's position? Looks to me like white's whole army is aimed at the kingside. Black's b7 bishop soon feels compelled to go to c8, to at least have some meaning.

Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  fm avari viraf: Her Majesty in jeopardy!
Mar-13-13  RookFile: In summary, my concern with putting the bishop on b7 is that a direct kingside attack by white will effectively leave black a piece down. I believe that if white plays properly, the outcome should always be like that of the 2nd game.

Of course, Weaver Adams said 1. e4 was a forced win for white. Maybe we should just go with that.

Mar-13-13  Dezaxa: To be fair to NN, he started playing in 1497, so he must have been getting on a bit in 1818, and his mental faculties were probably not what they used to be.
Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  scormus: <Morf ....10 ... g4 ..... White isn't forced to play 11.Nh2, but instead could offer a piece for accelerated development 'ala' a hybrid Muzio gambit: <11.Bxf4 gxf3 12.Rxf3> Black's awkward development offset the piece: Here, 13...Qxh4 is too risky>

Now there's a funny thing. A while ago playing W I got into a similar position to what would have been if NN played 10 .... g4. My opponent even dared me to play 11 Bxf4 saccing the N. Naturally I had to sac the N.

And for next several moves I worried, not about the piece down, but the mischief BQ would do coming to h4 etc.

Typically in such positions the ensuing tactics were a bit too much for either of us to control, we sort of had to let the game take us where it wanted to. In other words "Que sera sera."

Mar-13-13  JimNorCal: <rookfile>: "In summary, my concern with putting the bishop on b7 is that a direct kingside attack by white will effectively leave black a piece down."

The King also is a fighting piece! We have that on good authority :) It is rare for the White King to participate in the attack, thus the forces available to the two sides are roughly equal. At least, that is what I tell myself when I get into these situations....

Mar-13-13  BlackSheep: Desperate pun it was like the Texas sharpshooter fallacy was used to try and generate it .
Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Dezaxa: To be, fair to NN, he started playing in 1497, so he must have been getting on a bit in 1818, and his mental faculties were probably not what they used to be.>

Not true! Although his performance is spotty, on a good day NN can beat anyone:

Karpov vs NN, 2009

Kasparov vs NN, 1998

Alekhine vs NN, 1925

Lasker vs NN, 1921

NN vs Staunton, 1841

Philidor vs NN, 1790

Mar-13-13  tivrfoa: "o que será, será" Brazilian Portuguese. Português do Brasil. =D http://translate.google.com.br/#pt/...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0Rj...
Mar-13-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tal7777777: I think Renato Carosone also sang that song...
Mar-14-13  RookFile: Yes, but you can't exchange the king.
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