chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Yuri Averbakh vs Viktor Korchnoi
Tula (1950)
Sicilian Defense: Four Knights Variation (B45)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

NOTE: You are using our new chess viewer, "Olga." For more info see the Olga Quickstart Guide. You can switch back to the old viewer (pgn4web) from the pulldown menu below. If you have questions or suggestions see our Olga chessforum.

explore this opening
find similar games 17 more Averbakh/Korchnoi games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You should register a free account to activate some of Chessgames.com's coolest and most powerful features.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-28-06  danielpi: This is a fantastic game... No comments!?
Sep-16-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: [Fritz 10]: 1. e4 c5 2. Ne2 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e6 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bf4 e5 8. Bg5 a6 9. Na3 Be7 10. Nc4 Nd4 11. Bxf6 Bxf6 12. Nd5 b5 [12 ... Bg4 13. Qxg4 Nxc2+ 14. Kd2 Nxa1 ] 13. Ncb6 Rb8 14. Nxc8 Rxc8 15. c3 Ne6 16. a4 0-0 17. axb5 axb5 18. Bxb5 Rb8 19. c4 Nd4 20. 0-0 g6 [20 ... Nxb5!? 21. cxb5 Rxb5 ] 21. Ra7 Bg7 22. Re1 Qg5 23. Re3 h5 [23 ... Nxb5 24. cxb5 Rxb5 25. b4 ] 24. h3 [24. b4 ] Kh8 25. b4 Bh6 26. Bd7 h4 [26 ... Ra8 27. Rea3 Rxa7 28. Rxa7 f5 29. exf5 gxf5 ] 27. Rea3 Ne6 28. b5 [28. R7a6 seems even better 28 ... Rfd8 29. Bc6 f5 30. exf5 gxf5 ] Nc5 29. Bg4 Qc1 30. Qxc1 Bxc1 31. Rf3 [31. Ra1 Bb2 32. R1a2 Bd4 ] Kg7 32. Nc7 Kh6 33. Na6 Rb7 34. Rxb7 Nxb7 35. Be6 Bf4? 36. Bd5 Nc5 37. Nxc5 dxc5 38. b6 Rb8 39. b7 f5 40. Ra3 fxe4 41. Ra8 [41. Bxe4!? Kg7 ] e3 42. fxe3 [42. Rxb8? e2 ] Bxe3+ 43. Kf1 1-0.

If Black omits 9 ... b5 (9 ... Be7 or 9 ... Be6) then White should get in 10. Nc4 with a good game. Opening Explorer Here Black was a little too cavalier about regaining the Pawn with ... Nxb5/cxb5 Rxb5 even though White still has the edge with b2-b4. After 26. Bd7 White was a clear Pawn up and closed it out.

Sep-17-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  NeverAgain: <tpstar: If Black omits 9 ... b5 (9 ... Be7 or 9 ... Be6) then White should get in 10. Nc4 with a good game.>

Generally, yes, but it doesn't seem to be appropriate to lump 9...Be6 together with 9...Be7. In Megabase 2012 there are 30,000+ games with 9...b5, with White scoring 54%. There are less than 2,000 with 9...Be6 10.Nc4 (57% for White), while 9...Be6 10.Nc4 occurred in only 251 game, with White scoring an overwhelming 80%.

Looks like Korchnoi was unwittingly railroaded into a variation he was not familiar with, something closer to Pelikan/Chelyabinsk than his customary Taimanov, and he went wrong early with 9...Be7 - the first mistake.

14...Rxc8 was the second mistake. This routine Sicilian move left the b-pawn without support. 14...Qxc8 was indicated. By this point the engines (Komodo and Stockfish) start wising up (they pass 9...Be7 without a comment) and give White a .

16...0-0? was just reckless. Black is down a pawn, White has a passed pawn on the queenside and an 'eternal' Knight on d5. It was not too late for 16...Rb8.

<tpstar: Here Black was a little too cavalier about regaining the Pawn with ... Nxb5/cxb5 Rxb5>

Well, your own Fritz 10 doesn't indicate a good moment to regain it, neither does SF6 - <23 ... Nxb5 24. cxb5 Rxb5 25. b4> is [3.08/41]. White can double the Rooks on the seventh rank and gang up on the King and/or the d6 pawn at his leisure.

After 16...0-0 Black is strategically lost, IMO, and the crooked plan ...h5, ...Bh6 and ...h4 did nothing to change that. He could have offered more resistance by challenging the a7 Rook, at least. As it is, after 26...h4 White's advantage is worth a whole piece.

<tpstar: 28. R7a6 seems even better>

... and 28.Bxe6 fxe6 29.Nc7 is better still. Because of the threat of 30.Nxe6, forking the black Queen and the f8 Rook, Black has no time to grab the b4 pawn.


click for larger view

<tpstar: 42. Rxb8? e2 >

Actually, it's a draw, as the black King cannot escape checks without allowing the b-pawn to queen:

42.Rxb8? e2 43.Rh8+


click for larger view

43...Kg5 <43...Kg7 transposes back into the main variation after 44.Rg8+ Kh6, as <<44.Kf6 is met by 44...Rf8+ and 45...Rxf4 , and 44.Kh7 by 44...Rh8+ =>>> 45.Rf8+ 44.g3! e1Q+ 45.Kg2 Bxg3 <45...hxg3 loses to 46.h4+ Kf5 47.Kh3 and the b-pawn queens> 46.Rf1 e4 47.fxg3 Qxg3+ 48.Kf1 Qxh3+ 49.Kf2 Qg3+ 50.Kf1 Qd3+ with perpetual check.

So 41...e3 was an ingenious trap, a last-ditch effort, kudos to Averbakh for not falling for it.

The position after 9.Na3 occurred only once more in Korchnoi's tournament practice - in O Renet vs Korchnoi, 1988 at the Lugano Open he played 9...b5 and drew. A lesson well learned?

Sep-17-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <NeverAgain....Looks like Korchnoi was unwittingly railroaded into a variation he was not familiar with, something closer to Pelikan/Chelyabinsk than his customary Taimanov, and he went wrong early with 9...Be7 - the first mistake.>

The position which arises <is> a Lasker-Pelikan with a comparatively uncommon order of moves, as seen in similar fashion in Karpov vs Nunn, 1982.

<The position after 9.Na3 occurred only once more in Korchnoi's tournament practice - in O Renet vs Korchnoi, 1988 at the Lugano Open he played 9...b5 and drew....>

A game which is, as will be seen, classified as a Lasker-Pelikan.

Sep-17-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  NeverAgain: Right, another fail on the part of the automatic opening classification system. Did you see my inquiry about it a week ago or so in cg.com's forum and his reply that the system goes not by moves but by FENs?

Chessbase lists this game as B33, Scid explicitly includes this particular move order under B45 Taimanov Four Knights, though:

<B45o "Sicilian: Taimanov, Four Knights, 6.Ndb5" 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Ndb5 *

B45o "Sicilian: Taimanov, Four Knights, 6.Ndb5 d6"
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Ndb5 d6 *

B45o "Sicilian: Taimanov, Four Knights, 6.Ndb5 d6 7.Bf4" 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Ndb5 d6 7.Bf4 *>

Thanks for reminding me of the Karpov-Nunn game. I like reading well-informed posts like the first one there. For some people, apparently, chess history starts with the 80s and Kasparov; for others, it's "if Fischer didn't play it/against it, it didn't exist".

NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
Mind Game
from Inspirational Games by CKT73
8...Be7 9.Nc4 Nd4 10.Bxf6 Bxf6 11.Nd5 b5 12.Ncb6 Rb8 13.Nxc8
from tpstar SS by tpstar
Never_Again's analysis
by NeverAgain


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2017, Chessgames Services LLC