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Viktor Korchnoi vs Mark Danilovich Tseitlin
"The Old Man and the C-Pawn" (game of the day Nov-23-2007)
Be'er Sheva (1993), Be'er Sheva ISR, rd 8
Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange Variation (D85)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <xenophon: not sure if the pun fits-after all in the story after great effort the old man gains the fish only to have if eaten before landing it it-leaving him only with reflected glory>

Corrected some typos - yes - I recall that now - the fish (he pulls it in after what is an heroic, long, and arduous struggle. He cant get it on his boat and I think sharks eat it. But it is symbolic of - something ! Something noble...a great struggle - maybe of a chess game!

Nov-23-07  cannibal: First of all the pun, as funny as it is, doesn't fit at all because Korchnoi was a young lad of 62 when playing this game.

Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: Bless you, cannibal.
Nov-23-07  newzild: This is one of those games where you wonder just how much was "book" or prepared before-hand.
Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <newzild: This is one of those games where you wonder just how much was "book" or prepared before-hand.>

There was quite certainly some home preparation from both sides in this game. In the same tournament just four rounds before this game Viktor the Terrible used the same line in game with Huzman. See Korchnoi vs Huzman, 1993 (Btw, another gem)

Nov-23-07  xrt999: Why did white play 19.Qe6? I like 19.Ne6! much better. It has so many attacks, it threatens Nc7, forking K and Q, attacks the bishop on g7 with Nxg7+, attacks the pawn on c5. Black's only move to defend against all these threats is Kf7, a horrible move, and loses the c pawn. Black is toast.
Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <xrt999: Why did white play 19.Qe6? I like 19.Ne6! much better. It has so many attacks, it threatens Nc7, forking K and Q, attacks the bishop on g7 with Nxg7+, attacks the pawn on c5. Black's only move to defend against all these threats is Kf7, a horrible move, and loses the c pawn. Black is toast.>

Is black toast after 19.Ne6 Qc4?

Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: C-how easy it is to win a game by promoting a pawn!

Black seemed to be going well until the transition into the middle game. While white flourished,black's game died on the vine. Maybe he had a problem with a bone spur (a-la- Dimaggio)

Nov-23-07  xrt999: after 19.Ne6 Qc4 20.Nxg7+ Kf7 21.Qe6+ Qxe6 22.Nxe6 Kxe6 23.dxc5 Rac8 24.Bb4 or 24.Bd4 the game is of a similar position, but black's king is now on e6 and black's strong dark square bishop is gone. It seems that with 19.Qe6, Korchnoi's intent was to trade down queen's, I think 19.Ne6 gives the same result with better position for white.
Nov-23-07  xrt999: then again, I would have castled kingside as black on move 18, so what do I know...
Nov-23-07  syracrophy: ...And that little boy finally reached the goal!
Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Perhaps Black can force a draw by perpetual check with 18... Qc4!, when play might continue 19. Rc1 (19.Nxe4?! O-O ) 19... e3! 20. fxe3 Bxe5 21. Ne4 Rf8 22. dxe5 Rf1+ 23. Rxf1 Qxf1+ 24. Kd2 Qd3+ 25. Ke1 Qf1+ =.
Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: After 26.Rac1 black might try 26...Bc6:


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 2.3.2a mp up:

26...Bc6 27.hxg5 hxg5 28.Rc3 Rd8 29.Ra3 Bxe5 30.Bxe5 Rxe5 31.Rc1 Rd7 32.Rc2 Kf7 33.Rd2 = (-0.08) Depth: 20

Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Korchnoi's c-pawn was safe following the combined attacking and defending move 33. Rb8+!, since after 33...Kf7 34. Rc8 Black cannot play 34...Rexc5? because of 35. Rxc6 winning a whole piece.
Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: After 19.Ne6 Qc4 <20.Nc7+> Kf7 21.Bd2 white is better

Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: <Patzer2>is 18...Qc4 19.Rc1 Rd8 better for black?
Nov-23-07  Samagonka: A long, not so interesting game with a brilliant finishing.
Nov-23-07  xrt999: < patzer2:> CM suggests 32...Rd5 as the turning point for white. After the move order that followed 33.Rb8+ Kf7 34.Rc8 is now met with 34...Rd3+. After the exchange CM rates the game about even, and 32...Ra5 (+0.66)

In fact, black must have been low on time because at each move it gets worse, and CM makes the following suggestions: 34...Bb5, 35...Rf6, and 36...Ra6. After 36...Ba4 black is in big trouble (+3.12)

Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: <xrt999>I agree, 32...Rd5 appears to have been about the last chance to hold for black.

1: Viktor Korchnoi - Mark D Tseitlin, Beer Sheva 1993


click for larger view

Analysis by Rybka 2.3.2a mp up:
(22-ply)
1. (0.26): 33.Ne2 Rd3+ 34.Rxd3 exd3 35.Nd4 Bxg2 36.Rg1 Bb7 37.Rxg5+ Kf7 38.f4 Rxa3 39.c6 Ba6

2. (0.03): 33.g4 Kf7 34.Ne2 e5 35.Ng3 Rd3+ 36.Rxd3 exd3 37.Rb3 Ra4 38.f3 Rf4 39.Ne4 Bxe4

3. (0.00): 33.Rb8+ Kf7 34.g4 Rd1 35.Nh3 Rd5 36.Rc8 Bb7 37.Rc7 Bc6 38.Ng1 Ke8 39.Rc8+ Kd7

Nov-23-07  loftus: I have to disagree with previous posters. This is one of the best puns I've ever seen on chessgames.com!
Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Is 18...Qc4 19.Rc1 Rd8 better for black?> I'm not sure. It creates a lot of complications for both sides, but I think the line might lead to a draw.

One possibility is 18... Qc4 19. Rc1 Rd8 20. Ne6 Bh6 21. Nc7+ Kf7 22. Rc2 Qd3 23. e6+ Kg8 24. Qd1 e3! 25. Qxd3 Bxd3 26. Rb2 Bf4 27. Rb7 exf2+ 28. Kxf2 Rc8 29. Ba5 Rf8 30. Bb4 Rc8 31. Ba5 Rf8 32. Bb4 Rc8 33. Ba5 = with a draw by repetition.

P.S. Of course Rybka can probably find an improvement for both sides, as I'm still playing it out move-by-move on my old Fritz 8.

Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <xrt999> Indeed, 32...Rd5 was Black's last chance to hold, making Korchnoi's winning 33. Rb8+! all the more noteworthy.
Nov-23-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <loftus: I have to disagree with previous posters. This is one of the best puns I've ever seen on chessgames.com!>

Yes I like the pun - whoever writes these things on cg.com is pretty smart - & I'm not just crawling up their rectums - it's a fact.

The 'joke' was made that Korch was youngster of 62 and as youngster of nearly 60 I feel good about that!

So am I considered by some of the young punks I see as an oldy but I was running around a local fitness trail the other day and was told "You can do it!" by a young fellow. (He meant well, the bastard, but this old dog wont die easy!) and I told him I could go another circuit, AND I was 60, AND I poked my cheek and asked him if he would be anything like me even if he got to 60? ...and so on......there's life in us old dogs yet...me and Korch and others.

Nov-23-07  cionics: An eloquent ending by Korchnoi. I think the "old man" is showing that 62 is the new 40!!!
Nov-24-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: Odd how Korchnoi has three different c-pawns in the game, and the one he pushes on the last move is the same pawn he pushed on the first move.
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