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Alexander Kotov vs Kazimierz Plater
Moscow (1947), Moscow URS, rd 8, Dec-08
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Saemisch Variation (E28)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Aug-31-08  nimh: If Kotov's words in his book "Think like grandmaster" are to be believed he calculated the position after 45...Ng8 even 50 moves ahead. Nonetheless, he fails to see that the final position is dead draw, claiming that after Ka6 80. f6 Nxf6 81. Bc8+ Ka7 82. Kb5 bxa5 83. Kxc5 a4 84. Kb4 Kb8 85. Bf5 Kc7 86. Kxa4 white will win easily on the basis of 2 more pawns.

Rybka 3 doesn't support it:

1: Alexander Kotov - Kazimierz Plater, Memorial M.Chigorin 1947


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit :

86...Kc6 87.Kb4 Nh5 88.Bg6 Nf6 89.c5 g4 90.fxg4 Nxg4 91.Be8+ Kc7 92.Ba4 Nf6 93.Bc2 Kc6 94.Bd3 Nh5 95.Bb5+ Kc7 96.Bc4 Ng3 97.Bd5 Nh1 98.Bb3 Nf2 99.Bc2 (1.85) Depth: 26 00:00:00 0kN
86...Kc6 87.Kb4 Nh5 88.Bg6 Nf6 89.c5 g4 90.fxg4 Nxg4 91.Be8+ Kc7 92.Ba4 Nf6 93.Bc2 Kc6 94.Bd3 Nh5 95.Bb5+ Kc7 96.Bc4 Ng3 97.Bd5 Nh1 98.Bb3 Nf2 99.Bc2 (1.85) Depth: 27 00:00:00 0kN
86...Kc6 87.Kb4 Nh5 88.Bg6 Nf6 89.c5 g4 90.fxg4 Nxg4 91.Be8+ Kc7 92.Ba4 Nf6 93.Bc2 Kc6 94.Bd3 Nh5 95.Bb5+ Kc7 96.Bc4 Ng3 97.Bd5 Nh1 98.Bb3 Nf2 99.Bc2 (1.85) Depth: 28 00:00:03 135kN, tb=60
86...Kc6 87.Kb4 Nh5 88.Bg6 Nf6 89.c5 g4 90.fxg4 Nxg4 91.Be8+ Kb7 92.Bd7 Nf6 93.Kb5 Kc7 94.Bc6 Ng4 95.Be8 Nf2 (1.85) Depth: 29 00:02:30 8005kN, tb=1754
86...Kc6 87.Kb4 Nh5 88.Bg6 Nf6 89.c5 g4 90.fxg4 Nxg4 91.Be8+ Kb7 92.Bd7 Nf6 93.Kb5 Kc7 94.Bc6 Ng4 95.Be8 Nf2 (1.85) Depth: 30 00:05:29 18283kN, tb=3839

(Varend, 31.08.2008)

Sep-02-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: <nimh> Kotov certainly presented some interesting details regarding this ending in "Think Like A Grandmaster".

In "Grandmaster at Work", Kotov stated he was worried Plater would seal 43...Qh6, at the first adjournament. He believed 43...Qh6 was Black's only chance to save the game.

Fritz indicates Black's best move was: (.95) (23 ply) 43...Qd7 44.f6 Kb7 45.Kg3 a6 46.Bg6, with a very strong game for White.

During the adjournament, working on the assumption the sealed move was 43...Qh6, Kotov worked up a long and detailed analysis, which he indicated closely followed the actual game.

In both books, Kotov stated Black erred by playing 71...Ka6. Instead of 71...Ka6, Kotov claimed Black could have drawn by playing 71...Kb7 72.Kb3 Ng8 73.Ka4 Ka6 74.Bg4 Nf6.

After 71...Ka6, Kotov claimed White was winning.

Your Rybka analysis indicates the final position may still be a draw. However, I wonder if White can improve in your varation: 86...Kc6 87.Kb4 Nh5 88.Bg6 Nf6 89.c5 g4 90.fxg4 Nxg4, by playing 91.Bf7. If then 91...Kc7, White could play 92.Bd5.

What continuation does Rybka propose if White plays 91.Bf7?

Sep-12-08  nimh: It seems white is winning after all.

1: Alexander Kotov - Kazimierz Plater, Memorial M.Chigorin 1947


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Analysis by Rybka 3 32-bit:

(1.84) Depth: 20 00:00:01 37kN, tb=27
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Nh5 94.Bc4 Ng3
(1.84) Depth: 21 00:00:02 62kN, tb=39
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Nh5 94.Bc4 Ng3
(1.84) Depth: 22 00:00:03 78kN, tb=49
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Nh5 94.Bc4 Ng3 95.Bd3[]
(1.84) Depth: 23 00:00:05 125kN, tb=80
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Nh5 94.Bc4 Ng3 95.Bd3[]
(1.84) Depth: 24 00:00:10 199kN, tb=166
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Nh5 94.Bc4 Ng3 95.Bd3[]
(1.84) Depth: 25 00:00:13 278kN, tb=239
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Nh5 94.Bc4 Nf6 95.Bd3 Nh7 96.Bb1 Nf6 97.Bc2 (1.84) Depth: 26 00:00:24 549kN, tb=537
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Nh5 94.Bc4 Nf6 95.Bd3 Nh7 96.Bb1 Nf6 97.Bc2 (1.84) Depth: 27 00:00:33 701kN, tb=737
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Ng4 94.Bb3 Nf6 95.Bc2 Nh5 96.Bd3 Nf4 97.Bf1 Ne6 98.Kb4 Ng5 99.Bd3[] Nf3 100.Bc2 Nd2 (1.84) Depth: 28 00:01:00 1394kN, tb=1466
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Ng4 94.Bb3 Nf6 95.Bc2 Nh5 96.Bd3 Nf4 97.Bf1 Ne6 98.Kb4 Ng5 99.Bd3[] Nf3 100.Bc2 Nd2 (1.84) Depth: 29 00:01:34 2354kN, tb=2461
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Ng4 94.Bb3 Nf6 95.Bc2 Nh5 96.Bd3 Nf4 97.Bf1 Ne6 98.Kb4 Ng5 99.Bd3[] Nf3 100.Bc2 Nd2 (1.84) Depth: 30 00:01:57 3147kN, tb=3337
91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Ng4 94.Bb3 Nf6 95.Bc2[] Nh5 96.Bd3 Nf4 97.Bf1 Ne6 98.Kb4 Ng5 99.Bd3[] Nf3 100.Bc2 (1.84) Depth: 31 00:02:35 4134kN, tb=4718
91...Kc7 92.Bb3 Nf6 93.Bc2 Kc6 94.Kc4 Kc7 95.Kb5
(1.84) Depth: 32 00:06:21 11341kN, tb=15925 91...Kc7 92.Bb3 Nf6 93.Bc2 Kc6 94.Kc4 Kc7 95.Kb5
(1.84) Depth: 33 00:07:34 13756kN, tb=20255 91...Kc7 92.Bb3 Nf6 93.Bc2 Kc6 94.Kc4 Kc7 95.Kb5
(3.44) Depth: 34 01:26:10 242mN, tb=453337 91...Kc7 92.Bb3[] Nf6 93.Bc2 Kc6 94.Kc4 Kc7 95.Kb5
(3.44) Depth: 35 01:33:06 264mN, tb=482857 91...Kc7 92.Bb3[] Nf6 93.Bc2 Nh5 94.Kc4 Nf4 95.Ba4 Kc8 96.Bd1 Kc7 97.Kb5 Nh3 (3.44) Depth: 36 02:08:04 365mN, tb=769867 91...Kc7 92.Bb3 Nf6 93.Bc2 Nh5 94.Kc4 Nf4 95.Ba4 Kc8 96.Bd1 Kc7 97.Kb5 Nh3 (3.44) Depth: 37 02:34:47 452mN, tb=969064

(Varend, 12.09.2008)

Sep-14-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: <nimh> Fritz agrees White is winning after: 86....Kc6 87.Kb4 Nh5 88.Bg6 Nf6 89.c5 g4 90.fxg4 Nxg4 91.Bf7.

If 91.Bf7: (2.56) (37 ply) 91...Nf6 92.Bd5+ Kc7 93.Kb5 Nh5 94.Bc4 Nf6 95.Bd3 Kb7 (3.11) (32 ply) 96.c6+ Kc7 97.Kc5 Nh5 98.Be2 Nf4 99.Bg4 Ng2 100.Bd7 Ne3 101.c4 Kd8 102.Kd6 Nxc4+ 103.Kd5 Nb2 104.Kxe5.

If 91.Bf7 Nf6 92.Bd5 Kc7 93.Kb5 Ng4: (2.93) (34 ply) 94.Bb3 Nf6 95.Bc2 Ng4 96.c6 Ne3 97.Ba4 Ng4 98.Bd1 Nf6 99.Bf3 Ne8 100.Kc5 Nf6 101.c4 Ng8 102.Kd5 Ne7+ 103.Kxe5.

If 91.Bf7 Kc7 92.Bd5: (2.60) (40 ply) 92...Nf6 93.Kc4 Nd7 94.c6 Nb6+ (3.39) (34 ply) 95.Kb5 Nc8 96.Kc5 Nb6 97.Bc4 Nc8 (4.24) (20 ply) 98.Bd3 Nd6 99.Kd5 Nf7 100.Bb5 Nd6 101.c4.

Or 91.Bf7 Kc7 92.Bd5: (2.60) (40 ply) 92...Kd7 93.Kc4 Ne3+ 94.Kd3 Ng2 95.c6+ Kd6 96.c4 Ne1+ 97.Ke3 Kc7 98.Ke2 Nc2 99.Kf3 (3.60) (36 ply) 99...Kd6 100.Kg4 Ne1 101.Kf5 Nd3 (4.10) (35 ply) 102.Kf6 Nc5 103.c7 Nd7+ 104.Kf5 Kxc7 105.Be6 Nc5 106.Kxe5.

Or 91.Bf7 Kc7 92.Bd5: (2.60) (40 ply) 92...Ne3 93.Kb3 Ng4 94.Kc2 Ne3+ 95.Kd3 Ng2 96.c6 Nf4+ 97.Ke3 Kd6 98.Kf3 Kc7 (4.12) (35 ply) 99.Kg4 Ne2 100.c4 Nd4 101.c5 Kc8 102.Kg5 Kc7 103.Kf6 Nf3 104.Ke6 Ne1 105.Kxe5.

Or 91.Bf7 Kc7 92.Bd5: (2.60) (40 ply) 92...Nf2 93.Kc4 Kb8 94.c6 Kc7 95.Kb3 Nd3 96.Kc2 Nc5 97.Kd2 Na4 (3.65) (38 ply) 98.c4 Nc5 99.Ke2 Kc8 100.Kf3 Kc7 101.Kg4 Nd3 102.Kf5 Kd6 103.Kf6 Kd6 103.Kf6 Nc5 104.c7 Kd7 105.Kxe5.

In "Think Like A Grandmaster", Kotov gave his concluding variation ending with 86. Kxa4, and then stated, <"White's two extra pawns give him an easy win">. The win is there, but I think most of us would agree it is not easy.

Sep-16-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: In the position we have been analyzing,


click for larger view

after 86...Kc6 87.Kb4 Nh5 88.Bg6, Black could also try 88...Nf4, instead of 88...Nf6.

However, White is also winning in this variation: (2.98) (34 ply) 88...Nf4 89.Be8+ Kb6 90.c5+ Kc7 91.Kc4 Kd8 92.Bf7 Kc7 93.Kb5 Nd3 94.Be6 Nf4 95.Bg4 Ne2 96.c6 Nxc3+ 97.Kc4 Na4 98.Kd5 Nb6+ 99.Kxe5 Kxc6 100.Kf6 or 100.Kf5.

Sep-16-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: After 86...Kc6 87.Kb4 Nh5 88.Bg6 Nf6 89.c5, Black could also try 89...Kc7, instead of 89...g4.

However, White is also winning in this variation: (2.91) (37 ply) 89...Kc7 90.Kc4 Kc6 91.Bf5 Nh5 92.Be6 Nf6 93.Kb4 Nh5 94.Bd5+ Kc7 95.Kb5, (2.80) (30 ply) 95...Nf4 96.Bc4 Ng6 97.c6 Nh4 98.Be2 Ng2 99.Kc5 Ne3 100.Ba6 Nd1 101.Kd5 Nxc3+ 102.Kxe5 Kxc6 103.Kf5, and White is winning.

May-07-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: Very nice ending playing on both sides of the board.

Kotov describing the plan after 47..Kd8:
"1) transferring his king to the queen's flank and forcing Black to play ..a6;

2) exchanging the d6 pawn for the a6 pawn, forwhich the king is transferred to to g3 where it prevents the dangerous ..g4;

3) tranferring the bishop to g4, where it will wait for a convenient moment to get, via h5, f7, to d5 (if White is able to post his bishop on d5, his position will be winning).

After that, the king is tranferred once again to the queen's flank and createa a zugzwang position. Then the knight f6 will be forced to move back and give way to the bishop on h5.

Still, this plan was only successful because of Black's error on move 71 (see post above).

Oct-13-17  kereru: 43...Qh6! was clearly black's best practical chance. If 43...Qd7 44.f6! Kb7 45.Bg4 Qc7 46.Be6 white is obviously going to win. The B vs N ending even 2 pawns up is very difficult for white to win.
Oct-14-17  kereru: Don't see how White makes any progress if Black plays 45...Kd8 and 46...Ke7.
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