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Vladimir Kramnik vs Alexey Shirov
"Take This Rook and Kramnik" (game of the day Aug-07-2016)
Linares (1994), Linares ESP, rd 12, Mar-12
Queen's Gambit Declined: Baltic Defense. Pseudo-Slav (D02)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 29 times; par: 83 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-03-14  electrocloud: <perfidious> no adjournments in Linares 1994, Kramnik simply resigned (I have an old New In Chess in hand, with Shirov's annotations)
Mar-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <electrocloud> There were no adjournments in the event, or this game was not adjourned?
Mar-03-14  electrocloud: <perfidious> 2h/40m, 1h/20 time controls in the event
Mar-04-14  MarkFinan: Perf.. It appears he did resign under the time controls <electrocloud> gives. I find it very strange given the above position though.
Mar-05-14  Vdh: why not 32.Ne2
Oct-02-14  Mr. V: <Mark Finan> <I don't understand this game!? By that I mean, after all the great attacking play from both sides, caution already thrown to the winds, an exhibition of great attacking chess, and it ends with a whimper!? >

"This is how the world ends
this is how the world ends
this is how the world ends.

Not with a bang, but with a whimper"
-T.S. Eliot.

Sorry, I know that's not helpful, but I couldn't stop myself :)

Oct-03-14  ljfyffe: There's a phone number you can call.
Jun-27-15  Howard: Samuel Sevian just referred to 31...Re4 !! as the most amazing move he's ever seen.

It was in the 2015/4 issue of New in Chess.

Aug-07-16  Virgil A: This patter could have easily moved 42...Qc7

But 42...Qh1+! Such poise to get Q to b1. Grandmaster move.

Aug-07-16  nalinw: A reasonable pun for an absolutely fantastic game - thanks for reminding us of it.

Black is a piece down and another is attached by a pawn - what does he do?

He puts a Rook where it can be taken by one of two pieces!

Aug-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: This is one of Shirov's absolutely best games, and he played a LOT!

I remember when <Fire On Board> came out and I could hardly believe how good that book was and still is. I was reading it like a boy with OCD. This game was one of the highlights. Unlike previous games collections (up to Fischer), Shirov never tried to prove that he was won all the way through, or that he had seen everything. He was ruthlessly honest. (He was assisted in his analysis by, IIRC, the cutting-edge Fritz 4!).

My copy went the sad way of all good chess books. It was lent out. Where is it now? Almost certainly in that great man-made island swirling around the central Pacific.

However:

I can now afford
Another Fire On Board.

There is one major thing missing from that book. I am sure you know what it is: a win against The Great Man Himself. There is a draw against Kasparov - but nothing more.

Aug-07-16  botvinnik64: Wow:
I will have to dig for my old NIC if Shirov analyses this gem; what a game!!!
Aug-07-16  FairyPromotion: 31... Re4!! is one for the ages. A true masterpiece by Shirov.
Aug-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: amazing. At the end, is white assuming that one of the black pawns will queen, and that is why he resigned? It just seems as though white will have two very active rooks to attack pawns and the black king.
Aug-07-16  The Kings Domain: Sterling attack by Shirov. Nice to see a good game by two top masters of the time from the good ol' days.

The pun's one of the best. :-)

Aug-07-16  morfishine: Just another lacking play-on-word-non-pun trying to be witty at the expense of a poor players name, which in the end, stinks to high heaven

Almost like a pile of animal dung

Enough already

*****

Aug-07-16  raju17: How about 31 Rh3 the black queen is over
Aug-07-16  devere: You can't win a chess game by resigning. Alexey Shirov failed to resign, and wound up winning after 39.b7?? Well done by Shirov.

Shirov is a chess warrior (and artist), so why didn't Gary Kasparov ever give him a gift like this one at the chess board? It's a mystery.

Classical games: Vladimir Kramnik beat Alexey Shirov 15 to 12, with 28 draws.

Classical games: Garry Kasparov beat Alexey Shirov 15 to 0, with 14 draws.

Aug-07-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <raju17> I think 31.Rh3 is met by 31...Rg6! (threatening 32...Qxh3 33.Bxh3 Nh2#), and if 32.Rxh2, then 32...Nxh2+ 33.Kg1 Nf3+ followed by 34...Nxd2 and wins.
Aug-08-16  The Kings Domain: morfishine: Without you, the puns wouldn't be half the charmers that they are. :-)
Aug-08-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White pulls out the ending.
Aug-10-16  visayanbraindoctor: <Classical games: Vladimir Kramnik beat Alexey Shirov 15 to 12, with 28 draws.

Classical games: Garry Kasparov beat Alexey Shirov 15 to 0, with 14 draws.>

Kasparov had personal scores approaching this unbelievable massacre (although this was probably the worse) against most of the world's top players. I think he was playing at a significantly higher level than most. Kramnik had positive personal scores against most of the world's top players, but they were still in the realm of belief.

Looking back at his reign in retrospect, I think Kramnik and Anand would probably classify as first among equals champions, in Botvinnik's words. in contrast, Lasker, Capablanca, Alekhine, Karpov, Kasparov, and now Carlsen are dominant champions, playing significantly better than their contemporaries and subsequently achieving significantly better performances.

Shirov's stunning sac 31.. Re4 is based on an unusual discovered attack. If the Rook taken, fxe4, then black's fxe4 opens the f-file for the remaining Black Rook, which suddenly has a highway to the White king.

The principle behind the sac is simple to comprehend. What makes it so astonishing is that we usually think of pawns as moving forward in straight lines and so incapable of becoming the piece that is removed in a discovered attack. Here, the discovered attack involves a pawn moving sideways off a file, during a capture. A rare and beautiful gem of a sac by Shirov.

Feb-28-17  Saniyat24: ha ha <Mr.V> :D
Feb-28-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: How many games to do you see where the world's most brilliant move is played twice: 31..Ne4!!! and 34...Ne4!!! I liked it even better the second time. I bet Shirov's subsequent decline is due to his always playing Ne4 whenever possible in every game just out of the superstitious belief that it was his lucky move.
Jun-16-18  AuN1: < FSR: <raju17> I think 31.Rh3 is met by 31...Rg6! (threatening 32...Qxh3 33.Bxh3 Nh2#), and if 32.Rxh2, then 32...Nxh2+ 33.Kg1 Nf3+ followed by 34...Nxd2 and wins.>

I wondered the same thing, and the response to 31...Rg6 is 32.Rg3; kramnik should have then opted to challenge black's rook on the e-file with his own, and after the exchange of rooks, he could have relieved some pressure en route to converting his extra piece.

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