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Frank James Marshall vs Jose Raul Capablanca
"Cuban b-File Crisis" (game of the day Sep-22-2014)
Capablanca - Marshall (1909), New York, NY USA, rd 23, Jun-23
Tarrasch Defense: Rubinstein System (D33)  ·  0-1


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Kibitzer's Corner
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Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: In his book, "OMGP - Part I", G. Kasparov also gives White's 16th move as 16.Rfc1.
Jul-15-10  sevenseaman: Seeing these wonderful games, Marshall must have been a great player. Just unlucky to have been Capablanca's contemporary.
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  Petrosianic: And Lasker's, and Tarrasch's and Rubinstein's, and Alekhine's...
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  kingscrusher: I have video annotated this game which is a great demonstration of exploiting a pawn majority from the "Mozart of Chess" here:

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  Calli: A few points about this game:

Julius Finn pointed out that 14.Bxf3 exf3 15.Qa4+ Bd7 16.Nxd7 Qxd7 17.Qe4+ Qe7 18.Qxf3 should draw.

16.KR-B1 is also in ACM (July, 1909) which the earliest source I have.

Em. Lasker, annotating in the Evening Post, recommended 17.e4 followed by Qe3 as a way to get the pawns moving. It appears that Marshall's move deserves a question mark 17.Qe4?

ACM gives the time consumed as Marshall 2hr 17 min, Capablanca only 1hr 35 min.

This was the last game of the match, Capablanca finally ending it after nine draws in a row.

Jul-02-12  Zkid: <Gypsy> That position is definitely not a routine win. In fact I think it is quite likely drawn. Black cannot force either a kingside invasion or promotion; by combining threats he might invade but it's certainly not easy and probably not forced. The extra piece, on the other hand, is a definitely won position which proved to be simple technique for Capablanca.
Sep-22-13  rccomputacion: Parece muy poca ventaja un peón de mas en un flanco... yo pienso que Marshall jugo mal... bien jugado debería ser tabla... o no????
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  offramp: : < rccomputacion: Parece muy poca ventaja un peón de mas en un flanco... yo pienso que Marshall juego mal... bien jugado debería ser tabla... o no????>

Marshall didn't play very well but Capablanca did play well. It's a great example of making use of a pawn majority. But my favourite part is black's powerful bishop.

Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Shereshevsky's "Endgame Strategy" also gives <16.Rfc1>.

I wonder when will finally correct the score.

* submitted

Nov-04-13  RookFile: A perfectly modern game by Capa. One can easily see Karpov conducting this middlegame and endgame and getting the victory in exactly the same way.
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  al wazir: 48...Rxc3 47. Rd6+ Kf7 48. Rxg6 Kxg6? 1/2:1/2.
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  piltdown man: Yeah alright, I'll pay the pun.
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  Once: Simply delicious. Black's pawns are turbocharged. White's are clamped.
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  HeMateMe: It's a great pun, inspired!
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  Honza Cervenka: Lovely and very instructive endgame by Capa.
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  kevin86: white must give up his rook to avoid a quick mate.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Bubo bubo: <kevin86> But even this will grant White only a very short respite, since he cannot free his king from its cage: 50.Rd7+ Kh6 51.Rh7+ Kxh7 52.Kg5 Kg7 and mate in two.

Anyway, an instructive game and a cool pun!

Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: They didn't call him "the wily Cuban" for nothing.
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  Petrosianic: That's Wile E. Cuban. He was part coyote, on his mother's side.
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  HeMateMe: Petro is warming up for his next gig, lead comedy writer for Jimmy Fallon.
Sep-23-14  Shams: From what I've seen, Seth Myers is in more need of help than Fallon is.
Premium Chessgames Member
  maxi: The final position would be more interesting if White did not possess the c3 Pawn.
Mar-11-16  RookFile: Sure, he could play something like Rxg6+ with stalemate ideas. And Marshall, the great master of the swindle, would have have seen it. Alas, there was indeed a c pawn.
Dec-24-16  maelith: Classic example of utilizing your majority.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jonathan Sarfati: Although in this game, Capablanca made use of the Q-side majority in this game, 20 years later against the same opponent, this opponent had this majority and still lost! Marshall vs Capablanca, 1927
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