chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

John Nunn vs Martin Pribyl
Bundesliga (1995/96), Germany
Italian Game: Giuoco Pianissimo. Normal (C50)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 1,579 more games of Nunn
sac: 24.Rxd4 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Premium members can suggest a game for Guess-the-Move with the Guess-the-Move Suggestion Queue.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-27-12  rilkefan: I started with 26.Bg5 but chose Re1 instead because of Rf8. I didn't see Qh5 and I don't understand 28.Re6 - I figured (having seen ...Rd7) B moves check, Q interposes, Re8+, pick up d7.

Stockfish thinks 26.Bg5 Rf8 is just 0.0. It plays the sequence I expected after Re1: 26...Rg8 27.Re8 (just +6 instead of +11). In the game line it plays simply 28.Bf4+ as above. Probably Nunn was in Zeitnot.

Hmm, actually 25...Rg7 was much better.

23...Bxb2 was only +0.2. Probably Pribyl was in Zeitnot too...

Oct-27-12  Patriot: 24.Rxd4

24...Rxh6 25.Rxd5

24...Qxd4 25.Qxg6+ Kh8 26.Bg5

Another move I considered was 24.Qd2, but 24...c5 looks good enough.

----------

I guess after 24...Qxd4 25.Qxg6+ Kh8 26.Bg5 then 26...Rf8.

Oct-27-12  Razgriz: Got lost on move 26.
Oct-27-12  The Last Straw: I saw 24.♖xd4 ♕xd4 25.♕xg6+ ♔h8 but then couldn't find a good way to continue.
Oct-27-12  Abdel Irada: <Small ball<<<>>>

Today's puzzle is in the tradition of the National League: Rather than shoot it out with a home-run-hitting contest, American League-style, we will content ourselves with bunts, sacrifice flies, and anything else we can find to put the winning run on base.

In this case, that means settling for a "mere" pawn against best defense.

And now the sac fly:

<24. Rxd4!...<>>.

Here there are two choices for the opposing fielders:

<(1) 24. ...Rxh6>

Black bails out the easy way. But now he loses that proverbial horseshoe nail.

<25. Rxd5 >

End of variation. White has won a pawn: the passed d-pawn on which Black relied for counterchances. This hardly wins the game of itself, but the game is definitely the first player's to lose.

<(2) 24. ...Qxd4<>>

This is the "main line," in which Black takes the bait, although here too, as we will see, he has not committed himself to try to hold the material advantage.

<25. Qxg6†...<>>

Another chance for Black to bail out.

<(2.1) 25. ...Rg7>

Now I see nothing better for White than to win back the exchange.

<26. Bxg7, Qxg7
27. Qxg7†, Kxg7 >

Here, too, White emerges with one extra pawn; not necessarily a winning advantage, but enough to secure the upper hand.

But what if Black wants to keep the exchange?

<(2.2) 25. ...Kh8
26. Re1...<>>

Now White threatens 27. Re8†, Rxe8; 28. Qxe8#. Black can still escape with a slightly worse ending with 26. ...Rg7, but this would be inconsistent.

<26. ...Qa4?!<>>

The only way to hold e8 against the threatened incursion. Too bad it loses.

<27. Qf6†, Kg8
28. Re5 <>>

Now Black really is in for it. White threatens 29. Rg5† followed by mate, and there is nothing useful Black can do about it.

Finally, then, Black has little choice: The winning run for White will be safely on base. But the game is not yet over. For that, White will have to find some means of getting the baserunner home.

Oct-27-12  Abdel Irada: I see Pribyl found a resource in 26. ...Rd7 that I'd underestimated. White can win back the exchange with an extra pawn, as in the "bailout" lines in my solution post, but that is no warranty of victory.

Nunn, however, was more ambitious, and his ambition was rewarded. Was there a way out for Black? This would require further study. I may return to this ... then again, I may not.

Oct-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  bharat123: A good try is 24.Qd2 Bxb2 25.Qxd4+ Kh8 (25.. Qf7 26.Qd8+) 26.Qxb7. White is pawn up with better pawn structure.

But if black replies 24..c6 then 25.Bg5 Qf5 (25..Qe5 26.Bf4 winning the bishop)26.g4 the black bishop is hanging.

Am I missing any thing.

Oct-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  bharat123: After 24.Qd2 c5 25.Be3 looks like winning a pawn.
Oct-27-12  Abdel Irada: <bharat123>: For a moment I thought you might be on to another way to win a pawn. At first glance, Black seems to hold with 24. ...c5, but White can continue with 25. Be3!, winning a pawn in any case since 25. ...Rh4? loses to 26. Bg5.

*However*, after 24. ...c6; 25. Bg5, Qf5; 26. g4?, White has to watch out for 26. ...Qf3!, and if 27. Qxd4??, Rxh3 mates. This seems to refute the idea.

Oct-27-12  vinidivici: It is a bit easy for saturday for me. I calculated precisely until 26.Re1 and after that contemplated for sometimes and realized white attack too good to hold by black. Until Re1, those are straight forward moves, and after that its a bit hard because there are many replies but the point is whatever black would do, his king was too exposed and with the vulnerable e8 square everything just easier.. But maybe this suits for yesterday.
Oct-27-12  Abdel Irada: <vinidivici: It is a bit easy for saturday for me.>

It is and it isn't.

To calculate one's way to either winning a pawn or getting more if Black gets greedy and tries to hold the exchange is not difficult. But actually to *win* the game if Black defends properly is another matter.

Oct-27-12  cyclon: Today I proceed with ; 24. Rxd4 Qxd4 ( 24. -Rxh6 25. Rxd5 and besides a pawn down, he's in trouble - White's threat is f.e. 26. Qb3 ) 25. Qxg6+ Rg7 ( 25. -Kh8 26. Re1 Rg7 [26. -Rg8 27. Re8 Rg7 28. Bxg7+ Qxg7 29. Qh5+ [[29. Rxg8+ and after the exchange of pieces the pawn-endgame may, just may be winning for White]] 29. -Qh7 30. Rxg8+ Kxg8 31. Qxd5+ and 32. Qxb7 is theoretical winning game for White - practice is not quite the same.] 27. Qh5 Kg8 28. Bxg7 Qxg7 [ 28. -Kxg7 29. Re7+ mates] 29. Qxd5+ and 30. Qxb7 White will be 3 pawns up with Black King in the open.) 26. Bxg7 (26. Qe6+? Rf7) -Qxg7 and N-O-W in T-H-I-S position where White is already a pawn up and Black's King in the open I'd play 27. Qe6+ Qf7 28. Qg4+ Kh7 (or -Kh8 quite similarly, but 28. -Kf8? 29. Qb4+. Instead, Black could try 28. -Qg7 29. Qb4 b6 [ 29. -c6 30. Re1 Rf8 31. Re3 Black's in serious trouble. 29. -Rb8? 30. Re1, a pawn and the initiative ] 30. Rd1 [ maybe 30. Re1 is also plausible ] and H-E-R-E what Black plays? If 30. -a5, then 31. Qh4 with the idea of Rd4-g4. Though there are many lines and whether Black covers d5-pawn or not, White brings his Rook to the Kingside into attack with the Queen. ) and because d5-pawn is covered, White might play calmly 29. Re1 (instead of 29. Qb4 here ) where Whites Rook threats to penetrate with devastating consequences. If Black tries to prevent this by playing 29. -Re8 game might continue; 30. Rxe8+ [in case of 28. -Kh8 there's an intermediate check with 30. Qd4+ first] 30. -Qxe8 31. Qf5+ K- 32. Qxd5 Qe1+ 33. Kh2 Qxf2 ( or -c6 34. Qd4+ with two healthy pawns up with a long fight ahead still.) 34. Qxb7 Qf4+ 35. g3 and White should gradually win in theory. But, almost as usual, this may not be the game continuation at all.
Oct-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: The material is identical.

Black threatens 24... Rxh6.

The obvious move is 24.Rxd4:

A) 24... Qxd4 25.Qxg6+

A.1) 25... Kh8 26.Re1

A.1.a) 26... Qa4 27.Qf6+ Kg8 28.Re5 + -.

A.1.b) 26... Rd7 27.Qh5 Kg8 (27... Rh7 28.Re8+ Rxe8 29.Qxe8#) 28.Re6 looks winning.

A.2) 25... Rg7 26.Bxg7 and White is a pawn ahead and has the initiative and three passed pawns.

B) 24... Rxh6 25.Rxd5 + /- [P].

Oct-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  bharat123: <Abdel Irada>: <bharat123>: For a moment I thought you might be on to another way to win a pawn. At first glance, Black seems to hold with 24. ...c5, but White can continue with 25. Be3!, winning a pawn in any case since 25. ...Rh4? loses to 26. Bg5. *However*, after 24. ...c6; 25. Bg5, Qf5; 26. g4?, White has to watch out for 26. ...Qf3!, and if 27. Qxd4??, Rxh3 mates. This seems to refute the idea.

Thank u

Oct-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  paulalbert: I got to 26Re1, but certainly didn't see exactly how to win against various defensive tries.
Oct-27-12  James D Flynn: Material is equal but the White Ks pawn shelter is intact where the Black Ks position is open. Whites immediate concern is the attack on his B and 5o a lesser extent the attack on his b2 pawn. White can of course defend both by the passive Bc1. However, he could also offer to exchange Bs by 24.Bg5 Qxg5 25.Rxd4, which looks very promising sine the R not only is attacking the d5 pawn but also threatening Rg4 winning the weak g6 pawn. The disadvantage of 24.Bg5 is that Black can win a pawn by Bxf2+ then 25.Qxf2 removes an attacker from the g6 pawn and after 25.Rxf2 Qxg5 the d5 pawn is defended by the Q. Another way to offer the exchange of Bs is 24.Be3 after which Bxb2 looks bad because Rxd5 clears another diagonal on which to attack the Black K and also threatens R g5 adding an attacker to the g6 pawn. The disadvantage of 24.Be3 is that after Bxe3 25.fxe3 Qe6 defends both the d5 and g6 pawns and threatens to take the now weak e3 pawn with check. There is no hurry to move the B on h6, it takes away escape squares from the Black K and can be defended by 24. Qd2, which has the additional advantage of attacking the d5 pawn with check should the B move and threatens 25.Qxd4 Qxd4 26.Rxd4 Rxh6 27.Rxd5 winning a pawn. 24.Qd2 c5(not Bxb2 25.Qxd5+ Kh8 26.Qxb7 Re8 27.Rfe1 Rxe1+ 28.Rxe1 Rxh6 29.Re8+ Kg7 30.Qxc7+ Qf7 31.Re7 Qxe7(Black has no way to defend the Q so he will now have R and B for it) 32.Qxe7+ Kg8 33.Qe6+ Kg7 34.Qxa6 White has Q and 3pawns for R and B with an easy endgame win) 25.b4 Bxb2 (not b6 26.Be3 Bxe3 26.Qxd5+ wins the R on a8) 26.Qxd5+ Kg8 27.Bg5 Qe5 28.Qxe5 Bxe5 29.bxc5 and White is up 2 pawns in the endgame. Now for the game.
Oct-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The exchanfe sac lures the queen away and allows the white queen into the kill.
Oct-27-12  Marmot PFL: In a game like this I wouldn't worry much about playing 24 Rxd4 Qxd4 25 Qxg6+ although I did not see the win, as black's king is so exposed that even if there is a defense it will be very hard to find. after 25...Kh8 26 Re1 (threatens Re8+) Rd7 (Rxh6 27 Qxh6+ Kg8 28 Re7) and now 27 Qh5 with discovered check threats and if Kg8 28 Re3 threatening Rg3 looks decisive.
Oct-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: One for duty it rookxd4 binding g6 the aim infiltrate reason ar blip

in h7 clink to rites of passage in theory it too boot the bishop instead

white has right rook to swallow bishop it honour in f6 accept queen

flurry it doctor in digs us tenant it exchange in manage c2 ko in

g6+ white will be a pawn ahead after giving rookg7 again three

kingside passers advantage white having roam dog oats for Nunn it is

you in h8 a suprise allowing clear finish over e1 look it entrance

in e8 g3 or in e6 as the game unravel it oh in drone on green gauge

kicker mitigate in claw back it devious in rookd7 run queen in h5

all to played in free the queen for heading h7 off mister it aged in

king h8 as brother e1 black seals his tomb at head 26.re1 rd7 to

believe, 27.qh5 qd3 at evermore 28.re6 rg8 mate in three king alive

know more after bg7+ you lent ill da price in h7 as booting g7 also

g8 gumball it rampant defence at sea king h8 boxed in god ogle on

catchment 29.bg7+ king hampered in g7 so bald as a coot qh6+ king

moves over i f7 i see at effront our one 31.qf6#

Oct-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: I got 24 Rxd4 Qxd4 25 Qxg6+ Rg7 26 Bxg7 Qxg7.


click for larger view

So now what? White has to try to squeeze more out of this advantage and exchanging queens seems premature.

I like 27 Qh5.


click for larger view

This moves threatens 28 Qxd5+, winning the b pawn as well next move for a three pawn edge. If 27…c6, then 28 Re1, below, threatening 29 Rg6.


click for larger view

If 27 …Qf7, then 28 Qg4+ Qg7 29 Qb4, threatening the b pawn.


click for larger view

This looks like a grind it out endgame, where white has a two pawn or so advantage.

Oct-27-12  M.Hassan: "Very Difficult"
White to play 24.?
Equal

I only saw the following line:

24.Rxd4 Qxd4
25.Qxg6+ Rg7
26.Bxg7 Qxg7
27.Qxg7+ Kxg7

White has a pawn extra

If Queen exchanges does not tke place:

27.Qh5 c6
28.Re1 Qxb2
29.Re3 Qa1+
30.Kh2

Looks like equal endgame or similar case.
Time to check
==============
After a week of a beautiful holiday in Dominican Republic, still in vacasion mood and can not get close to solution!

Oct-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: White has the advantage due to Black's loose pawns floating around on <g6> & <d5>; but he must move quickly before Black consolidates. Also, while Black is not directly threatening the White King, he does have <24...Bxb2> angling for a draw

The immediate exchange-sac <24.Rxd4> suggests itself. Black has two replies: 24...Qxd4 & 24...Rxh6

(1) 24.Rxd4 <24...Qxd4 25.Qxg6+ Kh8 (25...Rg7 26.Bxg7 Qxg7 27.Qxg7 Kxg7) <26.Re1 Qa4 27.Bg5 Rf8 28.Bf6+ Rxf6 29.Qxf6+ Kg8 30.Re5>

*I didn't see Black's resource <26...Rd7>

(2) 24.Rxd4 <24...Rxh6 25.Rxd5

Oct-27-12  waustad: As so often happens, I got the first 4 or 5 ply but wasn't sure after that.
Oct-27-12  waustad: Then again, I don't put much time in. That is the same problem I had in tournaments. I was so used to playing blitz in bars that it was difficult to convince myself to take all of the time I had to look ahead.
Oct-28-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Hello <Phony Benoni> You too noticed <26...Qa4> in response to 26.Re1; I'm glad I wasn't simply daydreaming about either possibility: White's 26.Re1 seemed very strong and 26...Qa4 seemed almost forced.

On a side note, This particular POTD seems to be one of most sparsely kbitzed puzzles I've seen: barely 1-page. Apparently, it didn't generate too much interest, probably due to the rather transparent and limited options

search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
for learning gioco piano
from da mettere in GTM when queue allows it by davide2013
c3 d3
from ITALIAN GAME CLASSICAL by gambitfan
Saturday 27 - 24.?
from Daily Puzzle - October 2012 by zwsnkm
Game 7, p. 22 in Secrets of Practical Chess by John Nunn
from Spearheads C (Batteries involving the Q) by fredthebear
Game 7, p. 22 in Secrets of Practical Chess by John Nunn
from Italians (mixed) d3's Played Fredthebear's Piano by fredthebear
Game 7
from Secrets of Practical Chess (Nunn) by Qindarka
p. 22
from Secrets of Practical Chess (Nunn) by AdrianP
Normal Italian (and similar; no gambits)
by Zhbugnoimt
Italian Game Bc4 Nf6
by ISeth
Instructive
by akatombo
Central play
from Closed Giuoco Piano by lasker fan
p. 22
from Secrets of Practical Chess (Nunn) by nakul1964
chess-endgames-part-2
by saveyougod
Game 7
from Secrets of Practical Chess (Nunn) by isfsam
24.? (Saturday, October 27)
from Puzzle of the Day 2012 by Phony Benoni


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC