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David Graham Baird vs Adolf Albin
2nd City Chess Club Tournament (1894), New York, NY USA, rd 11, Nov-15
Spanish Game: Open Variations. Friess Attack (C80)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Mar-24-14  Skewbrow: Even I managed to see this right away. I share the misgiving with Phony Benoni, and tried to make the rook do the deed. But starting with 22...Rh2 leads to an interception 23 Qg3. Those linesmen just need to do their job.

BTW can the US members shed soome light as to why an event called *2nd City Chess Club Tournament* was held in New York? I would have thought that *2nd city* referred to Chicago already in 1894?

Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: The "First City" would refer to Roanoke.
Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Black has the bishop pair for a bishop, a knight and a pawn.

Black would deliver mate if it were possible to replace the rook on g2 with the queen. Hence, 22... Rg1+ 23.Nxg1 Qg2#.

Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Skewbrow> if you click on the blue link under 2nd city chess club tournament you'll see that this was the second time that the New York chess club had staged a tournament. Second tournament, not second city.
Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  radtop: Skewbrow. The answer lies in the links. This was the second tournament held by the City Chess Club.
Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: 22...Rg1+ 23. Nxg1 Qg2#
Mar-24-14  zb2cr: I love me some Mondays, I do, I do.
22. ... Rg1+ forces 23. Nxg1, and Black then gives mate by 23. ... Qg2#.
Mar-24-14  CopyBlanca: move 15 was bad by white. B-G5 better.
Mar-24-14  Morttuus: Well, if I'm sober enough, 22...Rxf2 23.Bxf2 (or Kxf2) Qg2 does the job too.
Mar-24-14  JG27Pyth: @<Morttuus> Rxf2? Qxf2
Mar-24-14  psmith: Back on move 7, a subtlety. After 7. Nxe5 if Black plays 7... bxa4?, White wins with 8. Re1!
Mar-24-14  Morttuus: JG27: Ah, damn by eyes. Life is a battle, and the bottle always wins.
Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: This is Clark W Griswold move: VACATION. 22...♖g1+ 23 ♘xg1 ♕g2#.
Mar-24-14  Karposian: I just realized that Black is Adolf Albin, the man behind Albin's Counter Gambit (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e5) which he surprised Lasker with in a game played in New York 1893. He was a rather strong player back in the day.
Mar-24-14  petrie911: Took me about 30 seconds to get. Mostly because I read it as "22. ?".
Mar-24-14  rudiment: Did anyone else first see: 22...Rxf2+ 23 Bxf2 (or Kxf2) Qg2 mate
Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajk68: <rudiment> 23. Qxf2 - not mate.
Mar-24-14  MountainMatt: Rg1+ and Qg2#!
Mar-24-14  LIFE Master AJ: Just a quick look at this game.

David G. Baird - Adolf Albin
[C80]
New York, NY / (11) / 1894.
[A.J.G.]

POTD / Monday / March 24th, 2014.

1.e4 e5; 2.Nf3 Nc6; 3.Bb5 a6; 4.Ba4 Nf6;
5.0-0 Nxe4; 6.d4 b5; 7.Nxe5!?,

Not a great move, but this game WAS played in 1894 ...

[ The main line would be: 7.Bb3 d5; 8.dxe5 Be6;
see MCO-15, page #55; columns # 43 - 60. ]

7...Nxe5; 8.dxe5 Nc5;

This is OK, 8...bxa4; might have been even better.

9.Bb3 Nxb3;

This wins the Bishop pair, (and I like it); however a couple of the engines that I tested seem to prefer 9...Bb7; instead.

10.axb3 Bb7;

So far ... it has not been a bad game, even by modern standards.


click for larger view

11.Qg4!?, (First strike?)

I have never been a big fan of bring the Queen out early, but here it actually makes sense, White hits g7, and ties up Black's King-side.

[ RR 11.Re1 Qe7; 12.Nc3, " " - Fritz 13. ]

11...Qe7!; 12.Nc3 Qe6;

This move pretty much neutralizes the WQ on g4.

13.Qg3 h5!?;

The box likes 13...♕g6; and that makes sense to me.

14.h3?!, (Ugh!)

This is lame, if White could not do any better than this, he should have swapped the Queens on e6.

[>/= 14.Bg5!, '=' ]

14...Bc5; 15.Be3 h4;

Black already has a promising attack here ...


click for larger view

Now White should place his Queen on f4, when things don't look too bad for White.

16.Qg5? Rh6!?;

Fritz prefers 16...Be7; and I like that move as well.

17.Qxg7??, Suicide.

[>/= 17.Qg4▢ 17...Rg6!; ]

17...Rg6; 18.Qh8+ Bf8; 19.Rfe1?,

This is terrible ... f3 or Rfd1 was resignable, abut at least White does not get mated.

[White should have tried: >/= 19.Rfd1 Qxh3; 20.Kf1 Bxg2+; etc. (Black is winning.) ]

19...Rxg2+; 20.Kf1 Bf3!;

A nice "boxing-in" of the White King, this Albin guy could really play chess.

21.Qxh4 Qg6; 22.Ne2,

I guess White "thought" he was stopping mate (in one); as g1 is now covered.


click for larger view

This is the position for our POTD ... ... ...
Monday; March 24th, 2014.

[RR 22.Re2 Rg1# ]

22...Rg1+; White resigns. (NxQ is met by ...♕g2#.)

A pretty game by Adolf Albin.

0-1

Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: A nifty finish, even if was Monday-obvious that Black simply had to throw a major piece at the White king
Mar-24-14  PJs Studio: 22...Rg1 took me about .4 seconds to find. Now, how do I improve my opening play?
Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: I've had a long day, so it's nice to see a puzzle that I can actually get. :)
Mar-24-14  Skewbrow: Thanks for the bit about "2nd" referring to the tournament <blushing emoticon>.
Mar-25-14  LIFE Master AJ: http://www.ajschess.com/lifemastera...

I post this link because the opening is the same as the game ...

Mar-25-14  LIFE Master AJ: At the bottom of the game is a link for lots of games in the Open -- Ruy Lopez / Spanish Game.
search thread:   
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