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Lev Polugaevsky vs Viktor Korchnoi
"Extra! Extra! Read All About It!" (game of the day Jul-13-2019)
Korchnoi - Polugaevsky Candidates Semifinal (1980), Buenos Aires ARG, rd 14, Aug-20
English Opening: Symmetrical. Three Knights Variation (A34)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-22-09  Ulhumbrus: Baruch H Wood said in his report on the game in the Daily Telegraph, that after 21 Ke4 there were enough Black pieces remaining on the board to harass White's King to death.
Jul-07-14  Howard: As far as the Korchnoi team's gamble that Polugaevsky's squad had not seen the aforementioned Clarin article by Larsen, there were a couple other reasons why they decided to take the chance, as explained in Soviet Chess (Andy Soltis).

One was that the Soviet delegation was not likely to use valuable hard currency just to buy a mere newspaper while in Buenos Aires.

Another was that the crucial 14th game took place on.......a Sunday. The local Soviet embassy might have had a copy of that Clarin for that day, but it would be closed that day given that it was Sunday.

And the rest.....is history !

Jul-02-15  Howard: Portisch, by the way, should have won that particular game against Huebner, according to the Informant.
Jan-22-16  Howard: A year later in the 1981 U.S. championship, Peters and Seirawan drew a game using this variation.
May-17-17  Petrosianic: This is also the variation that Tal beat Polugaevsky with in the 1979 Interzonal. I'm not sure why White would want to play it. What does he get in exchange for having his King buffetted about and stuck in the center? Very Steinitzian, I'm sure, which is a synonym for "For Masochists Only".
May-20-17  Howard: As I see it, there was quite a bit of difference between the 1979 game and this one. In the former game, Tal's knight remained entrenched on d3 for quite some time. That didn't happen at all in this game.
Jun-06-17  N0B0DY: <N0B0DY> understands the intention of the self-pinning move <15.Ke2>.
Aug-10-17  Saniyat24: <NOBODY> except Polugaevsky...bravo for fighting in a very difficult situation against an upbeat Korchnoi...!
Jul-13-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Weird. I didn't recall this match, just the players' 1977 Candidates Match where Korchnoi was leading 6-1 after seven games.Korchnoi - Polugaevsky Candidates Semifinal (1977)/Viktor Korchnoi
Jul-13-19  mrknightly: Would someone please explain the relationship of the lead ("Extra, extra...) to the game? Thanks.
Jul-13-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <mrknightly: Would someone please explain the relationship of the lead ("Extra, extra...) to the game? Thanks.>

Read <The Alchemist>'s post from June 26, 2006. I believe Larsen joked later that "those who don't read <Clarin> sleep in the streets!".

Jul-13-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<N0B0DY> <N0B0DY> understands the intention of the self-pinning move <15.Ke2>.>

Well, White clearly wanted to break the pin of the knight against the queen somehow. Although I must admit that I've never seen it done quite that way.

Jul-13-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Korchnoi created a LOT of fun headlines! The battle in Baguio City--that was a slugfest.
Jul-13-19  Ironmanth: Jeez, what a brutal battle. Never seen this one before; thanks chessgames!
Jul-13-19  Chesgambit: King is not safe
Viktor Korchnoi wins
Jul-13-19  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 22 dpa done

1. - / + (-0.90): 17...Qxe6 18.Qd3 a5 19.Nc2 Na6 20.Rhb1 Rfd8 21.d5 Qd6 22.Kf1 Rac8 23.Kg1 Bxf3 24.gxf3 Qf6 25.Qd1 e6 26.Ne3 exd5 27.Nxd5 Qg5+ 28.Kh1 Nb4 29.Qg1 Qxg1+ 30.Kxg1 Nxd5 31.exd5 Rxd5 32.Rxb7 Rd2 33.Rb5 a4 34.Rb7

2. -/ + (-0.88): 17...fxe6 18.Rab1 a5 19.Nc2 Nc6 20.Rb3 Nb4 21.Nxb4 axb4 22.h3 Bxf3+ 23.gxf3 Qa6+ 24.Rd3 Qxa2 25.Qxa2 Rxa2+ 26.Ke3 Ra3 27.f4 e5 28.fxe5 Rf3+ 29.Kxf3 Rxd3+ 30.Ke2 Rxd4 31.Ke3 Rc4 32.Rb1 Kf7 33.Kd3 b5 34.h4 Ke6 35.f4 Kd7 36.f5 gxf5 37.exf5 Rxh4 38.f6 Ke6 39.Rf1 exf6 40.exf6

Jul-13-19  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 22 dpa done

1. - / + (-0.98): 16.Qd2 a5 17.Nc2 Nc6 18.Kf1 Bxf3 19.gxf3 Nh5 20.Rb1 Rac8 21.Be2 Rc7 22.d5 Nf4 23.Ne3 Nxe2 24.Qxe2 Nd4 25.Qd1 e5 26.Rg1 Rfc8 27.f4 Nc2 28.Ng4 exf4 29.e5 Qa6+ 30.Qe2 Qxe2+ 31.Kxe2 Nd4+ 32.Kd3

2. - / + (-1.04): 16.Rb1 a5 17.Nd5 Nc6 18.Kf1 Rab8 19.h4 Ne6 20.h5 g5 21.Rb6 Bxf3 22.gxf3 Nexd4 23.Bb5 Qe5 24.Bxc6 Nxc6 25.Rg1 Rfd8 26.Qb1 Kf8 27.Qc1 f6 28.Qa3 Rd6 29.Kg2 g4 30.Qe3

Jul-13-19  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 22 dpa done

1. - / + (-1.00): 15...a5 16.Nc2 Nc6 17.Qd3 Qc7 18.Rac1 Rad8 19.Qc3 Nh5 20.Kf1 Bxf3 21.gxf3 Qd6 22.e5 Qd7 23.h4 Qf5 24.Be2 Qf4 25.Rd1 e6 26.Qb2 Rd7 27.Rg1 Qxh4 28.Rg4

2. - / + (-0.93): 15...e6 16.Rc1 Qf6 17.Qd2 Bxf3+ 18.gxf3 a5 19.Nc2 Rc8 20.Bb5 Nh5 21.Ne3 Nf4+ 22.Kd1 Rxc1+ 23.Kxc1 Nh5 24.Nc4 Qxf3 25.Re1 Na6 26.Kb2 Qf4 27.Qxf4 Nxf4 28.Nb6 Rd8 29.Bxa6 bxa6 30.Kc3 Kg7 31.Kc4

3. - / + (-0.88): 15...Nd7 16.Nd5 Rc8 17.Ne3 Bxf3+ 18.Kxf3 Ne6 19.g3 Nf6 20.Kg2 Nxe4 21.d5 N6c5 22.Rc1 Qd7 23.f3 Nf6 24.Re1 Rfd8 25.Rc2 b6 26.Qd4 Qd6 27.Qb2

Jul-13-19  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4

15.Rc1 Nd7 16.Be2 Nb6 17.g3 Rc8 18.Kg2 Rxc1 19.Qxc1 Bxf3+ 20.Bxf3 Qxd4 21.Nd5 Nxd5 22.Rd1 Ne3+ 23.Qxe3 Qxe3 24.fxe3 Ne6 25.Rd7 Rd8 26.Rxb7 Rd2+ 27.Kg1 Rxa2 28.Rxe7 a5 29.e5 Ng5 30.Bd5 Rd2 31.Bg2 a4 32.Ra7 Ra2 33.h4 = / + (-0.43) Depth: 24 dpa done

Jul-13-19  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 25 dpa done

1. = (-0.12): 14.h3 Be6 15.Qe2 Qd6 16.Rb1 Nc6 17.Nxc6 Qxc6 18.Bb3 Bxb3 19.Rxb3 Qc1+ 20.Qe1 Qxe1+ 21.Kxe1 Rfc8 22.Ke2 b6 23.Ke3 Ne6 24.Ra3 f6 25.Rb1 Kf7 26.g3 h6 27.d4 Kg7 28.d5 Nc5 29.Nd4

2. = (-0.17): 14.Rb1 Bg4 15.h3 Bxf3 16.Qxf3 Nd7 17.Bd5 Qb6 18.Qe3 a5 19.Qxb6 Nxb6 20.Nc2 Nxd5 21.exd5 Rfc8 22.Ne3 Ne8 23.Ke2 Nd6 24.Rhc1 b5 25.Rc6 Kg7 26.Rbc1 Rd8 27.Rc7 Rac8 28.R1c6 Rxc7 29.Rxc7 Re8 30.d3 h5 31.g4

Jul-13-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Kudos to <thegoldenband> for this very nice pun of the day/game of the day.

Well done, sir!

Jul-14-19  kontrippo: Even with the black pieces, Korchnoi was in a good shape in those years. If you want, you can watch my version of the game with a classical music at the back:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUJ...
Jul-14-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <AylerKupp: <<N0B0DY> <N0B0DY> understands the intention of the self-pinning move <15.Ke2>.> Well, White clearly wanted to break the pin of the knight against the queen somehow. Although I must admit that I've never seen it done quite that way.>

My SF10 (40 ply, about 2 hrs) doesn't place Ke2 among its top dozen choices, which I'm sure donesn't surprise anyone. Its favorite is 15.Be2 (-0.64). 15.Ke2 is about -1.6.

Note, though, that SF endorses Larsen's and Korchnoi's judgment that the position after 14....Bg4 is not good for White. Going back, it prefers 10.Ne2, to be followed by d2-d4 and h2-h4 (+0.25, 43 ply) to 10.Nd5 (0.00, 43 ply). It doesn't particularly care for 11.Bb2 or 13.Nxb4, and 14.d4 is just a mistake.

Jul-23-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<keypusher> My SF10 (40 ply, about 2 hrs) doesn't place Ke2 among its top dozen choices>

I hope that you realize that my post was 100% tongue in cheek, if not more. Although I'm technically correct, 15.Ke2 does break the pin of the knight against the queen, even though it's one of the ugliest moves I've ever seen. And, of course, this is one of those cases where the "cure" is worse than the disease.

Jul-23-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <ayler kupp>
<I hope that you realize that my post was 100% tongue in cheek, if not more.>

Most definitely.

Psychologically, it's interesting. A very strong GM played this crazy-looking move. I think he realized his preparation was bad, but then he overreacted.

If he hadn't been playing a candidates' match against a defector back in the days of the Cold War, I'll bet he would have shrugged and played Be2.

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