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Carl Schlechter vs Philipp Meitner
Vienna-A (1898)
Italian Game: Evans Gambit. Morphy Attack (C51)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-12-09  CHESSTTCAMPS: White is down 2 pawns, but his king is safe and his pieces are placed optimally to attack the black king. The key pawn at g6 is protected by Q and N, but it is apparent that both defenders can be removed with a single shot:

25.Qxe7+! Qxe7 (else mate next) 26.Rxg6!

The threat of Rg7# now forces black to move the Rh8:

A) 26... Rhg8 27.Rxh6#

B) 26... Rhf8 27.R1g1 (threatening Rxh6#) Qg5 28.R6xg5+ Kh8 29.Rg6 Rf7 30.Rxh6+ Rh7 31.Rxh7#

B.1) 28...Rf5 29.Bxf5+ gxf5 30.Rg7+ Kh8 31.R1g6 Nf8 32.Rxh6+ Nh7 33.Rxh7#

B.2) 27.Rxh6+ Kg8 28.Rg1+ Kf7 29.Bg6+ Kg8 30.Be8+ Qg7 31.Rxg7# is a faster alternative.

C) 26... Re8 (or d8/c8) 27.R1g1 (Rxh6+ also works) Qg5 28.R6xg5+ Kh8 29.Rg6 Re7 30.Rxh6+ Rh7 31.Rxh7#

C.1) 29... Nf8 30.Rxh6+ Nh7 31.Rxh7#

I'm certain I've seen this game before, but it's been a while.

Aug-12-09  cyclon: Oh, Chopin.
Aug-12-09  prbprb2: What about 27. white rook on a1 to g1
regardless of black's 26th move? Isn't it mate for white on move 28?
Aug-12-09  randomsac: Got the first few moves, then failed to see that Rg7 was indeed a mate threat because the knight protects the rook, which allows an unblockable double check for mate. So close...
Aug-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: Jeez, I saw the knight fork potential at f6, and thought I was on to something with 25.Qd6 (stopping one square shy of the best move). The idea is 26.Qxd7 Qxd7 27.Nf6+. Black can prevent Nf6+ with 25...Rf8, and then I win a pawn with 26.Qxe6. Whee.

Checking with the computer, I see that 25.Qd6 really isn't a bad move, but my plan of answering 25...Rf8 with 26.Qxe6 leaves black better after 26...Nf5!.

The better reply to 25...Rf8 is 26.Qxe7+. Of course, if I had seen that, then I should have just played 25.Qxe7+ to begin with. :-\

Aug-12-09  Samagonka: Drastic attack! Big respect for all who got it.
Aug-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  doubledrooks: White caps off his fine play with 25. Qxd7+. Now if 25...Qxd7 then 26. Rxg6, and black has no good answer to the threat of 27. Rg7#. For example, 27...Rhg8 28. Rxh6#.

I didn't calculate all the lines to mate as some kibitzers did. I simply stopped when white was up significant material.

Aug-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: The only comment I have to add is concerning the questionable move 23...Kh7, whereby black pins his g pawn and seals his fate.

If, instead, 23...Kf8, he still has a fighting chance.


click for larger view

Now 24 e6 is questionable because the white knight is en prise.

Aug-12-09  TheaN: Wednesday 12 August

<25.?>

Target: 2:10;000
Taken: 1:58;497
Par

Material: Black up, ♘+2♙ vs ♗ (slight change in format for easy reading).

Candidates: Bxg6†, Rxg6, Nf6†, Qxe7†....oh, <[Qxe7†]>

-ML-
A nice puzzle with quite some follow up. The Black g6 square seems very well defended, but is actually a major weak point. Two times attacked, three times defended, it should be enough. A sham sac actually reduces the defenders from three to one, and the Black camp breaks up.

<25.Qxe7†!> obviously, rejection is fatal, if the Queen is allowed to enter Black falls in one or two.

/A\
<25....Kg8 26.Qg7‡ 1-0> or the stupendous <25....Qf7 26.Qxf7‡ 1-0>

/B\
<25....Qxe7 26.Rxg6!> now this is major point to go wrong. After 26.Bxg6†?! Kg8 any White Bishop move leads to Kf8, and after Ke8 the Black King escapes. Accurate defense is needed by Black, but in the end White will probably lose with this move order. Rxg6 is a completely different story. Almost any move leads to mate in one with a double check:

/BA\
<26....Rbg8 27.Rg7‡ 1-0> Rbg8 is only one of the moves that lose in one. Black cannot interpose on the Bishop's diagonal, so the double check will always be there. The Rook is always defended by the Knight when it delivers check on g7. As such, Black has to create another escape square to avoid an immediate mate. The King himself can't move, nor the h6-pawn. The h8-Rook has to move. One of its moves leads to another mate in one:

/BB\
<26....Rhg8? 27.Rxh6‡ 1-0> is another threat in the position. The Black Rook has to move further up. Lets say he defends his Queen to avoid 27.Rg7†† Kh8 28.Rxe7 with White being an exchange up.

/BC\
<26....Re8 27.Rag1!> the killer move. Now White is threatening another double checkmate, the one on h6, Rxh6‡. Black cannot parry this one. Once again an escape square has to be found, moving the King doesn't work:

/BCA\
<26....Kh8 27.Rxh6† Qh7 28.Rxh7‡ 1-0> as Black doesn't have enough defenders around anymore. However, going for the drastic g-file interposition Qg5:

/BCB\
<26....Qg5 27.R6xg5†† Kh8 28.Rg6 Re7 29.Rxh6† Rh7 30.Rxh7‡ 1-0> and the Black charade is down and out once and for all. Time to check what was played.

Aug-12-09  TheaN: 3/3

Seems like <TheBish> sums up my variation pretty well, with the prior move to mate being Nf6 instead of Re7.

Although mating, 27.Rxh6† didn't convince me as this actually leads to all kinds of different combinations after the particular Black Rook moves, as illustrated (Rhc8, Rhe8 and Rhf8 are all different). After 27.Rag1, the prior Rook move doesn't matter, as a mating combination on the g and h-files is unpreventable anyway. Good puzzle.

Aug-12-09  mworld: took me a long time to see that Rxg6 was the key move and I am pleased with myself for acutally being patient enough to find it. Very difficult to see the power of the double attacking mate on the king.
Aug-12-09  MrMelad: Very easy stuff
Aug-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  David2009: Wednesday's puzzle Schlechter vs Meitner, 1898 White to play 25? Medium/Easy

Many tempting alternatives e.g. Qd6 threat QxNd7 winning a piece: but Rd8 holds, jettisoniong only the Pawn at e6. I will go for 25 Qxe7+ Qxe7 26 Rxg6 (threatening Rg7++#) Rhd8 (guarding the Qe7) 27 Rag1 (threatening 28 Rxh6++#) and I cannot see a defense for Black, e.g. 27..Kh8 28 Rxh6+ Qh7 29 Rxh7#
Check:
====
OK (unless kibitzers have found a hole in my proposed follow-up - this has happened to me before). Time to study their comments.

Aug-12-09  wals: The following may be of interest to those seeking help.

[Event "Vienna-A"]
[Site "Vienna-A"]
[Date "1898.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Carl Schlechter"]
[Black "Philipp Meitner"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C51"]
[Annotator "Rybka 3 1-cpu (30m)"]
[PlyCount "51"]

C51: Evans Gambit: Declined and Accepted without 5...♗a5

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6
3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Bc5 6. d4 exd4 7. O-O d6 8. cxd4 Bb6 9. Nc3 Bg4 10. Bb5 Kf8 11. Be3 Nce7 12. Bc4 Nf6 13. Qb3 Bxf3 (13... Nc6 14. e5 (14. Bxf7 Na5 15. Qd1 Kxf7 ) 14... Nd7 15. exd6 (15. Bxf7 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Nxd4 17. Bxd4 Bxd4 ) 15... Bxf3 16. gxf3 ) 14. gxf3 White has the pair of bishops Qe8 (14... Nc6 15. Rfd1 (15. Bxf7 Nxd4 16. Bxd4 Bxd4 )) 15. a4 ( 15. Rac1 h6 ) 15... Ba5 (15... Nc6 ) 16. Ne2 (16. Rfc1 Nc6 ) 16 Rb8 (16... b6 17. Rac1 ) 17. Kh1 (17. Rac1 d5 18. Bd3 Qd7 ) 17... c6 Consolidates b5+d5 (17... d5 18. Bd3 ) 18. Rg1 (18. e5 dxe5 19. dxe5 Nd7 ) 18... d5 ♗lack threatens to win material: d5xc4 (18... Qd7 19. Bd3 ) 19. Bd3 h6 ♙revents intrusion on g5 (19... Qd7 20. Nf4 ) 20. Ng3 (20. Bf4 dxe4 21. fxe4 Rd8 ) 20... g6 Controls f5+h5 (20... Qd7 21. e5 Ne8 22. Qc2 ) 21. e5 White threatens to win material: e5xf6 (21. Bf4 Nd7 ) 21... Nd7 22. Qa3 (22. f4 Rc8 ) 22... Kg7 (22... c5 is worth looking at 23. Ne2 Kg8 ) 23. Nh5+ Kh7 ?? BLUNDER leads to further unpleasantness (23... Kf8 24. Nf6 Qd8 ) 24. e6 Decoy: e6 fxe6 (24... Qd8 is the last straw 25. Bf4 Nf8 26. Bxb8 Nxe6 ) 25. Qxe7+ a decisive sacrifice Qxe7 26. Rxg6 (26. Rxg6 Rhf8 27. Rxh6+ Kg8 28. Rg1+ Qg5 29. Bxg5 Rxf3 30. Be7+ Kf7 31. Rg7+ Ke8 32. Bg6+ Rf7 33. Rxf7 Nf8 34. Nf6#) 1-0

Aug-12-09  A Karpov Fan: Qxe7 Rxg6 then choose your mate :-)
Aug-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: Wednesday (Medium/Easy)

Schlechter vs Meitner, 1898 (25.?)

White to play and win.

Material: B for N+2P. The Black Kh7 has 1 legal move, g8, which the White Rg1 x-rays. The White Bd3 pins Pg6 to Kh7. The Black Pg6 is protected 3x and attacked 2x, but the White Qa3 attacks one of the defenders, Ne7, for which another defender, Qe8, is the sole guard. The Black Pg6 is therefore really protected 1x and attacked 2x, making the candidate 25.Qxe7+ interesting. The White Kh1 is secured from check.

Candidates (25.): Qxe7+

25.Qxe7+ Qxe7 [else, drop Ne7]

Candidates (26.): Bxg6+, Rxg6

[26.Bxg6+ Kg8 leaves f8 open for flight]

26.Rxg6 (threatening 27.Rg7+# or 27.Re6+ 28.Rxe7+)

26…Re8 [Rg8 27.Rh6#]

27.Rag1 (threatening 28.Rxh6+#)

(1) Flight is impossible:

27…Kh8 28.Rxh6+ Qh7 29.Rxh7#

The minimal mating pieces are Bd3, Rg6, and Rg1. By process of elimination of the possible defenses (counter-attack, capture, immobilization, interposition, reinforcement, or flight), interposition against Rg1 is the only option:

(2) 27…Qg5 [Qg7 28.Rxg7++ Kh8 29.Rh7#] 28.R6xg5+ Kh8

29.Rg6 (threatening 30.Rxh6#)

29…Nf8 [or Nf6] [Re7 30.Rxh6+ Rh7 31.Rxh7#]

30.Rxh6+ Nh7 31.Rxh7#

Aug-12-09  WhiteRook48: 25 Qxe7+ works but after 25...Qxe7 I chose 26 Bxg6+?? and loses
Aug-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: For today's Wednesday puzzle, White's surprise sham sacrifice 25. Qxe7+!! sets up the decisive threat of an over powering double discovered check after 25...Qxg6 26. Rxg6! .
Aug-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Nf3em: obviously, 25. Qxe7+!! Qxe7 (forced! if 25 ... Kg8 26. Qg7+ mate) 26. Rxg6!! ... there is no defense against double-threat of Rook check on g7 and the discovered check by light-squared Bishop ... a very good example of tactics involving decoying and/or diversion aa well as double-attack ... and also, all moves by White are with "brute force"!
Aug-13-09  LIFE Master AJ: <chesstalesfan> The onus is on you, its upt to you to prove a win in your line.
Aug-13-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: A great hold and hit theme. The threatened discovered check/dbl check is so lethal that black must resign!
Aug-13-09  Chesstalesfan: <LMAI>
of course you are right!
I tried, I came so long:
26.Bxg6+ Kg8 (force')
27.Bf7++ Kxf7
28.Rg7+ Kf8
29.Rg1 Qe8
30.R1g6 Bd8
31 Bxh6 Rxh6
32 Rxh6 Nf6
33 Rh8+ mate in the next
of course I am kidding, because the black can give the Queen even on 32..Qxh5. Then it is over for the white. Thank you anyway
Aug-14-09  LIFE Master AJ: I pick up my analysis with move 20 ... (a game this old, I don't think it makes sense to analyze the opening). Please note that I considered 19...h6; a bad move ('?') for Black as well.


click for larger view

20.Ng3 g6?!; (Dubious)
To me, it looks wrong to push this Pawn, and Fritz does not like it either. [The machine prefers >/= 20...dxe4; 21.fxe4, Qd7; (Probably with the idea of; ...♗/a5-c7-d6.); & now White plays 22.f3, '±' with a fairly large advantage.]

21.e5 Nd7; 22.Qa3 Kg7?; (Ugh!)
This is known in boxing as ... "walking into a upper-cut."

[>/= 22...c5T; ("T" = box.) - Fritz 11.]

23.Nh5+ Kh7??; (A mistake.)
Here 23...Kf8T; was the ONLY move.

[ >/= 23...Kf8T; 24.Nf6 Qd8; 25.Rac1, '±' with "comp" for White. (I am being generous calling this "comp" ... Fritz considers this winning for White.) ]

24.e6! fxe6!?;
Now we have reached the position for this game's P.O.T.D.


click for larger view

Its basically a position of ... "White to move and win."

25.Qxe7+!! Qxe7; 26.Rxg6!, " " (Black resigns.)

White has threats of Rg7# and also taking on h6. (For example, if now, 26...Rg8; then simply 27.RxP/h6#, does the job.)


click for larger view

The only question is that if Black would have played 26...Re8!?; would Schlechter have found the very fine play of 27.Rag1!, " " which is winning (for White) in all lines.

For more analysis and discussion of this game, please see the web page: Schlechter vs Meitner, 1898.

1-0

Nov-22-10  sevenseaman:


click for larger view

<LM AJ> will 27 Rh6+ Kg8 28. Rg1+ Qg7 29. RxQ+ Kf8 Rh8# do?

Nov-22-10  sevenseaman: For the sake of clarity my full comment should have read as...

If ...26. Re8 27. Rxh6+ Kg8 27. Rg1+ Qg7 28. RxQ+ Kf8 29. Rh8#

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