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Boris Spassky vs Samuel Reshevsky
Second Piatigorsky Cup (1966)  ·  Nimzo-Indian Defense: Normal. Gligoric System Bronstein Variation (E55)  ·  1/2-1/2
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Kibitzer's Corner
Sep-14-09  WhiteRook48: maybe someone dared Spassky not to play 4 Bg5, the Leningrad
Sep-14-09  AnalyzeThis: I'm amazed that Spassky didn't win the endgame anyway. It looked to me like he had dangerous chances.
Mar-02-11  Ulhumbrus: In the position after 16...Bb7 White's pieces are no less than four moves ahead of Black's pieces in development. If other things are equal and White can make count his lead in development, White's game is more than won.
Jan-09-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  zydeco: In his notes Spassky makes it clear that he felt he should have won this game.

Reshevsky plays the opening weakly. He seems to gesture towards ....e5 with 9....Qe7 but never achieves it. Reshevsky says that he planned 11....Bc7 but feared 12.e4 cxd4 13.Nb5.

Spassky thinks he should have played sharply with 15.Bb5 and after 15.....cxd4 16.Nxd4 Nc5 17.Rac1 Bb7 18.b4 Ne4 19.Rc7 Rfc8 20.Rxe7 Rxc1+ 21.Qf1 Rxf1+ 22.Kxf1 white has control of the seventh rank.

On move 17, Spassky writes, "The American grandmaster is defending resourcefully in a difficult position."

If 18.Rc7 Nc5. Spassky suggests 18.Rd1 as an improvement. If 18....Nf6 19.Nf5 Qe5 20.Ne7+ Kh8 21.f4 and white chases black's queen around the board. If 18....Nc5 19.Nb3 Qe5 20.Nxc5 bxc5 21.Rdc1 with advantage.

Spassky suggests 24.Qd4 Nxc6 25.Qxf6 gxf6 26.Rxc6 Rfd8 27.Rc7 Rd2 28.Rb7 Rxb2 29.R1c7 Rf8 30.Rxa7 with good winning chances.

On move 28, Spassky writes, "I am playing this part of the game with uncertainty." He suggests 28.Qf3 trading queens into an obviously superior endgame.

46.Rb5 was white's last real chance for a win.

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Round 12 August 4th
from Second Piatigorsky Cup 1966 by Benzol
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