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Rudolf Spielmann vs Friedrich Koehnlein
Munich (1904), Munich GER
Vienna Game: Vienna Gambit. Main Line (C29)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 21.Bxh7 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-29-02  bishop: 18...Kh8 was not good as it allowed White to penetrate to the seventh rank. Maybe 18...Re8 would have held.
Sep-23-04  Swindler: What's wrong with 21...Qxe7 22.Rxe7 Kxh7 23.Rxf7? Too me it seems White has an edge but it still looks drawish. It seems better then the text move.
Sep-23-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <Swindler> 21 ... Qxe7 22. Rxe7 Kxh7 23. Rxf7 Rc8 24. Rd7 wins a second Pawn (24 ... c6 25. Rxb7, otherwise 25. Rxd5) and it would be tough to hold the R&P endgame. At least with R&B versus Q Black had some swindling chances. I agree that Black was too eager to trade down while leaving his bad Bishop around, but the ghastly 19 ... Bg8 20. Bf5 Qc6 might have held better.
Sep-24-04  sneaky pete: <tpstar> That's what I thought and had ready to post when I noticed that after 23... Rc8 24. Rd7 c5! white doesn't win that second pawn at all. 25.Rxd5 cxd4 etc; 25.dxc5 Rxc5 26.Rxb7 Rxc3 etc; 25.Rxb7 cxd4 26.cxd4 Rxc2 27.Rxa7 Rc4 etc or in this line 26.Rxa7 dxc3 etc.

On the other hand, his practical chances after giving up the queen in this position are an illusion. A queen's bishop just won't do for a swindle, one always needs a knight. Even 2 knights might be better against a queen than rook and bishop.

Sep-24-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <sneaky pete> Good call! 24 ... c5! liquidates to only a 1 Pawn up endgame for White, therefore Swindler was right how that was Black's best chance. I would choose 25. Rxb7 cd 26. cd Rxc2 27. Rxa7 Rc4 28. Re7 Rxd4 (28 ... Ra4 29. Re5 Rxa2 30. Rxd5) 29. Re2 which cuts off the Black King from the Queenside, then White has the outside passed Pawn, but Black has excellent chances to hold. Which line do you like?
Jun-03-09  birthtimes: If White has an a, g, and h pawn and if Black just has a d and g pawn, White will win by moving his a-pawn down to either the 6th or 7th rank (depending upon what Black does) with his rook located in front of the pawn while his king blockades Black's d pawn. Therefore, White should play 28. a4 rather than 28. Re7 as noted above.
Jun-03-09  chillowack: Birthtimes, do you have an actual line of analysis to prove that? It seems to me that if Black's rook is behind White's pawn, and Black's king never exposes himself to a rook check, White can never promote the pawn. And if the White king is tied to the blockade of the d-pawn, he can't come help; so how does White win?
Jul-13-09  birthtimes: Here's the position in question as a variation from the actual game continuation...

21. Bxh7 Qxe7 22. Rxe7 Kxh7 23. Rxf7 Rc8 24. Rd7 c5 25. Rxb7 cxd4 26. cxd4 Rxc2 27. Rxa7 Rc4 28. a4 Rxd4

Now, if White moves his a-pawn down to the 7th rank, Black's rook will likely have to attack the a-pawn from the a-file, giving White's King a chance to attack Black's rook, and when that happens Black will have to move his rook from the simultaneous protection of his d-pawn, thereby allowing White's King to attack and capture Black's d-pawn. For example, one line could go...

29. a5 Ra4 30. Kf2 Ra3 31. a6 Kh6 32. Ra8 Kh7 33. a7 g6 34. Ke2 Kg7 35. Kd2 Kh7 36. Kc2 Kg7 37. Kb2 Ra4 38. Kb3 Ra5 39. Kb4 Ra2 40. Kc5 ...

Aug-20-09  zanshin: For White move 21, Rybka 3 prefers <21.Qh4>. I have limited analysis to only 2 moves, Rybka's choice and the move played <21.Bxh7>.


click for larger view

[+1.90] d=20 21.Qh4 Qg8 22.Re7 Be8 (0:00.23) 2608kN

[+1.77] d=20 21.Bxh7 Qxe7 22.Rxe7 Kxh7 23.Rxf7 Rc8 24.Rd7 Re8 25.Kf1 Re6 26.Rxc7 Ra6 27.Ke2 Rxa2 28.Kd3 b6 29.Rd7 Ra5 30.h4 Kh6 31.g4 Kg6 (0:12.36) 100252kN

Preliminary conclusion is that both moves work, but Spielmann chose the flashier move. There were other playable moves also.

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