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Wilhelm Steinitz vs Ed Pilhal
Vienna (Austria) (1862)
Italian Game: Evans Gambit. Slow Variation (C52)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-08-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Very similar finish to Anderssen's immortal game. Stinitz was champ for a LONG time,one of top three players in his century and top 10 of all time.
Jan-08-04  Mostolesdude: woa!!! what an interesting opening and queen sacrifice for white...
Jan-08-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  jaime gallegos: Wilhelm Steinitz ( William when he went to America ) was so crazy that he played Damiano defense sometimes ( 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f6? 3.Nxe5 Qe7 ) and won !
Jan-08-04  Phoenix: I learned from a friend, that the Damiano Defense ( 1.e4 e5 2.♘f3 f6? 3.♘xe5 ♕e7 )is actually very hard to get an advantage against!
Jan-08-04  TheTurk: mostolesdude- the opening is the evans gambit, it was extreamly common in those times, and played as automatically as the lopez/spanish is today.
Jan-08-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  ketchuplover: Can a chess student learn more from a miniature(25 or fewer moves-my definition)or a longer game?
Jan-08-04  ughaibu: It depends on what the sudent wants to learn, miniatures dont illustrate much about the endgame.
Jan-08-04  TheTurk: true ughaibu, most miniatures are very instructional on tactics in opening/middle game, but hardly ever have anything to say about the endgame.
Jan-08-04  Shadout Mapes: The first thing a beginner at chess should learn is tactics, so these kind of games are very good, but if you want to learn endgame and strategy, they're not as useful.
Jan-09-04  TheTurk: [The first thing a beginner at chess should learn is tactics] i agree mapes but endgames come a close second. just dont spend too much time on opening theory untill you really need to.
Jan-10-04  talchess2003: <[The first thing a beginner at chess should learn is tactics] i agree mapes but endgames come a close second. just dont spend too much time on opening theory untill you really need to.>

Endgames come last...
tactics, middle game strategies, openings, endgames.

Jan-11-04  Bears092: If you don't know how to win in the endgame, what sense is there in using a tactic to win a pawn in the middlegame?
Jan-11-04  Minor Piece Activity: But if you can't get a pawn in the first place, what's the sense in learning the endgame? But if you can't understand the opening, how will you find a good position to get a pawn, to win the endgame with? But if I continue talking like this, when will I stop?
Jan-11-04  Catfriend: LOL! <Minor Piece Activity> And to the issue: learning endgames gives you a much better understanding of the position regardless the playing-phase! So studying it will improve you at all the game!
Jan-17-04  TheTurk: Catfriend, i thoroughly agree.
Feb-03-04  N. Cline Plane: Preliminary dissection of the phases of a chess game is bewildering to the novice, not helpful. It is much better, at first, to study complete games, and study opening/midgame/endgame when it seems natural to divide a game into these phases, when the intuition feels the difference between them.

ketchuplover:

Studying miniatures will only teach you to play miniatures. Better to have a balanced diet. As a starting point, try Morphy, Capablanca, Fischer. Capa particularly would be good to study and emulate.

Be aware that the Soviet era produced a lot of fixed matches. Soviet vs. Soviet games are not always good to study. See my comment on Karpov vs. Yudasin - proof it still was happening in the late eighties.

Like skill at anything else, skill at chess will come with time and effort. And don't worry too much about exercises or instructional manuals or books on openings. The heart of the thing lies in studying the greatest who have come before you and playing fearlessly. Out of these two, real understanding develops.

Jun-15-04  Whitehat1963: I can't decide which move I like most, but 15. Nxd7 seems to be the best candidate.
Feb-12-05  aw1988: To the above issue of studying endgames reminds me of a very amusing quote: Why do players bother trading off pieces when they do not know the endgame? The answer is simple; not for the fact that they hope the opponent does not know it either, but for the fact that both parties are sure to be lost at any given stage!
Dec-16-08  WhiteRook48: The 1st world champion doesn't need the Queen!
Oct-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <Catfriend: *** And to the issue: learning endgames gives you a much better understanding of the position regardless the playing-phase! So studying it will improve you at all the game!>

In this vein, there is an old saying: If you study openings, you will learn openings. If you study endgames, you will learn chess.

Nevertheless, this game is certainly a highly entertaining and aesthetically satisfying example of play in the great romantic style from the master of positional chess.

Oct-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <kevin86: Very similar finish to Anderssen's immortal game. *** >

Also interesting is to compare Steinitzís opening play with this game by Anderssen from 11 years earlier: Anderssen vs Mayet, 1851

Steinitz with <8. Ba3!> improves on Anderssenís <8. e5?!>, demonstrating that when he played in the romantic style (as was his trademark in his youth), Steinitz could out-Anderssen even Anderssen himself.

Nov-24-13  Mostolesdude: wow time flies, it's been almost 10 years since I first commented on this game.... *cries*

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