chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Wilhelm Steinitz vs Ed Pilhal
"The Austrian Morphy" (game of the day Jul-24-2018)
Vienna (1862)
Italian Game: Evans Gambit. Slow Variation (C52)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 1 more Steinitz/E Pilhal game
sac: 15.Nxd7 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: To flip the board (so black is on the bottom) press the "I" key on your keyboard.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-11-04  Catfriend: LOL! <Minor Piece Activity> And to the issue: learning endgames gives you a much better understanding of the position regardless the playing-phase! So studying it will improve you at all the game!
Jan-17-04  TheTurk: Catfriend, i thoroughly agree.
Feb-03-04  N. Cline Plane: Preliminary dissection of the phases of a chess game is bewildering to the novice, not helpful. It is much better, at first, to study complete games, and study opening/midgame/endgame when it seems natural to divide a game into these phases, when the intuition feels the difference between them.

ketchuplover:

Studying miniatures will only teach you to play miniatures. Better to have a balanced diet. As a starting point, try Morphy, Capablanca, Fischer. Capa particularly would be good to study and emulate.

Be aware that the Soviet era produced a lot of fixed matches. Soviet vs. Soviet games are not always good to study. See my comment on Karpov vs. Yudasin - proof it still was happening in the late eighties.

Like skill at anything else, skill at chess will come with time and effort. And don't worry too much about exercises or instructional manuals or books on openings. The heart of the thing lies in studying the greatest who have come before you and playing fearlessly. Out of these two, real understanding develops.

Jun-15-04  Whitehat1963: I can't decide which move I like most, but 15. Nxd7 seems to be the best candidate.
Feb-12-05  aw1988: To the above issue of studying endgames reminds me of a very amusing quote: Why do players bother trading off pieces when they do not know the endgame? The answer is simple; not for the fact that they hope the opponent does not know it either, but for the fact that both parties are sure to be lost at any given stage!
Dec-16-08  WhiteRook48: The 1st world champion doesn't need the Queen!
Oct-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <Catfriend: *** And to the issue: learning endgames gives you a much better understanding of the position regardless the playing-phase! So studying it will improve you at all the game!>

In this vein, there is an old saying: If you study openings, you will learn openings. If you study endgames, you will learn chess.

Nevertheless, this game is certainly a highly entertaining and aesthetically satisfying example of play in the great romantic style from the master of positional chess.

Oct-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <kevin86: Very similar finish to Anderssen's immortal game. *** >

Also interesting is to compare Steinitzís opening play with this game by Anderssen from 11 years earlier: Anderssen vs Mayet, 1851

Steinitz with <8. Ba3!> improves on Anderssenís <8. e5?!>, demonstrating that when he played in the romantic style (as was his trademark in his youth), Steinitz could out-Anderssen even Anderssen himself.

Nov-24-13  Mostolesdude: wow time flies, it's been almost 10 years since I first commented on this game.... *cries*
Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  andrewjsacks: The end is reminiscent of you know what timeless classic.
Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  OrangeTulip: Zuckertort also played a dozens of highly entertaining Evans gambits
Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Ed Pilhal was known as <the Austrian Morphy>, but here he loses badly.
Jul-24-18  FSR: <andrewjsacks> I'm not sure what game you have in mind.
Jul-24-18  Autoreparaturwerkbau: <FSR: <andrewjsacks> I'm not sure what game you have in mind.>

I suppose the Evergreen game: Anderssen vs Dufresne, 1852

When i saw today's GOTD, the Evergreen game came to my mind instantly. They are similar in many ways.

Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  takchess: Offramp, Given some of my recent chess club games. I am now known as the <American Ed Pilhal> ... Cheers.
Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: Was Pill-Head fond of Austrian morphyne?
Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Big Pawn: <ChessHigherCat: Was Pill-Head fond of Austrian morphyne?>

Thank you for sharing this valuable information.

Jul-24-18  Howard: As Evans stated in Fischer's M60MG, "two playing styles could hardly be more dissimilar"--referring to Steintz and Morphy.

But it's been said that in Steintz's younger days, he wasn't really the ironclad positional player he was later known to be.

Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < Big Pawn: <ChessHigherCat: Was Pill-Head fond of Austrian morphyne?> Thank you for sharing this valuable information. >

awe come on BP it was funny!

Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: < WhiteRook48: The 1st world champion doesn't need the Queen! >

he needed it to SAC it

Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <PawnSac: < Big Pawn: <ChessHigherCat: Was Pill-Head fond of Austrian morphyne?> Thank you for sharing this valuable information. >

<awe come on BP it was funny!>

I just noticed his "witty remark" in your comment", since I have him on ignore where he belongs. Somebody should explain to him that the squiggly thing at the end of the end of the sentence is called a "question mark" and thus denotes a question rather than a statement of information. Explaining what a joke is would be hopeless.

By the way, <BIG PAWN> I have blown the whistle for your racist comment calling my country a @#$%hole, even if you can cite the example of your role model, Trump, stooping to the same level. I don't usually react when you insult me because I know you're just anti-American propaganda tool (a fact that seems to escape the attention of otherwise intelligent people, despite the fact that you even adopt the persona of Archie Bunker), but your racist insults directed at my country are too much. You even made a bigger fool of yourself than usual by preceding the comment by some absurd lies about what an "extremely tolerant" person you are.

From now on, any time I notice you making any racist or sexist comments or personal attacks on other members (in other words, practically every post, except when you're trying to lie low) I'm going to adopt your charming habit of "blowing the whistle, and I encourage all the other users to do the same.

Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Big Pawn: <CHC: From now on, any time I notice you making any racist or sexist comments or personal attacks on other members (in other words, practically every post, except when you're trying to lie low) I'm going to adopt your charming habit of "blowing the whistle, and I encourage all the other users to do the same.>

Look at him throwing his girly, liberal hissy fit lol.

He's all wound up about "racism" and "sexism" - what a girly man.

BE A MAN!

ACT LIKE A MAN!

He should be ashamed of himself acting so soft, sensitive and effeminate. What a pu--y!

Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: Thanks for providing yet another opportunity. I'm blowing the whistle on your personal attack against me. I encourage everyone else to do the same.
Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4: d 22 dpa done

1. = (-0.24): 8.e5 Ne4 9.Qe1 Nc5 10.Bg5 Ne7 11.Nxd4 Ne6 12.Nxe6 dxe6 13.Na3 h6 14.Rd1 Bd7 15.Bb5 c6 16.Bxe7 Qxe7 17.Nc4 cxb5 18.Nxa5 b6 19.Nb7 0-0 20.Qe4 Rac8 21.Nd6 Rc5 22.Qb7 Rxe5 23.Qxa7 Rd8 24.Qxb6 Re2 25.Nxb5 Rxa2 26.Qc7 e5 27.c4 Rc2 28.Rd5 Re2

Jul-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4: d 22 dpa done

1. = / + (-0.43): 9...Ne4 10.exd6 cxd6 11.Qe2 Qe7 12.Nxd4 Nxc3 13.Qb2 Nxd4 14.Nxc3 0-0 15.Nd5 Qe4 16.Rfd1 Nc6 17.Rac1 Rd8 18.Qb3 Nd4 19.Qb2 Nc6 20.Qb3

2. = (0.00): 9...Nxe5 10.Nxe5 dxe5 11.Qb3 Qd7 12.Re1 Kd8 13.Rxe5 Re8 14.cxd4 Rxe5 15.dxe5 Ne4 16.e6 fxe6 17.Qf3 Nf6 18.Bb2 e5 19.Na3 Qf5 20.Rd1+ Ke7 21.Qg3 Nh5 22.Qh4+ Nf6 23.Qg3 Nh5

search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
17 moves
from Chess Miniatures, Collection V by wwall
Evans Gambit. Slow Variation (C52) 1-0 Q sac, Disc Dbl ++
from Some S-upermen of Yesteryear by fredthebear
Evans Gambit
by Amazonwarrior
Evans Gambit. Slow Variation (C52) 1-0 Q sac, Disc Dbl ++
from QThee Queen is MEAN to Fredthebear Volume Two!! by fredthebear
MorphyMatt's favorite games
by MorphyMatt
games to study
by belak
The Dark Side
by lonchaney
Mate in 17.
from hammering's favorite games by hammering
46
from Elements of Combination Play in Chess - Reinfeld by jbo
Steinitz sacs a queen!
from alex97's favorite games by alex97
Game collection: 5
by p2c
World Champions
by clifton
Noteworthy Games
by BAJones
Start from 14...Ne7
from Chess Tactics, by GM Drazen Marovic by Atsa
58 move 16. a minature in the Evans Gambit
from Sharpen Your Tactics 1- 350 by takchess
evans gambit
by nadvil


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2018, Chessgames Services LLC