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Duncan Suttles vs Samuel Reshevsky
Lone Pine (1975)  ·  English Opening: Great Snake Variation (A10)  ·  1-0
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Kibitzer's Corner
Mar-30-04  ruylopez900: The Canadian defeats the American! Excellent! It's 1812 all over again!
Mar-30-04  Kenkaku: Not to take anything away from Suttles, but one must consider Reshevsky's age here.
Mar-30-04  ruylopez900: True, but Reshevsky continued playing seriously for another 10 years after this game and played other GMs until 1991. He's not quite in decline here, though he certainly wasn't at his peak.
Jul-15-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  IMlday: Suttles vs Reshevsky, 1975

This was a most entertaining game. Suttles got an edge out of the opening through White square control, then 2 'pawn islands' to 3, ergo more targets in the advantageous endgame.

Circa move 30 Suttles had about 15 minutes and Reshevsky only a minute to reach move 40. There was a flurry of moves, unrecorded by the players and misrecorded by the bulletin people. Black's 33rd should be ..Ra7 and move 36 is ..Re6. This set up the dramatic situation at move 40. Reshevsky's flag was hanging at the split second point. His hand was right ready to play his 40th move. In this situation Suttles thought for ten minutes until his own flag was hanging. I was wondering if White could win with so few pawns left. Then Suttles moved 40.Ke2!! stepping into 8 different disco checks. Reshevsky's jaw dropped. His hand hovered for a split second and he rejected them all playing ..Kh7. So after 41.Rh3+ and Kd3 White had solved the problem of his King reaching the Queenside and the game was easy.

In problem composition a R+N or B+N battery with 8 possible discovered checks is called a 'Knight Wheel', but I don't know any other GM game where it has turned up in practice.

Sep-29-04  francescog: <chessgames.com> IMLDay has found that there is some error in the score of this game, maybe you could you fix it?
Feb-20-05  aw1988: Lol ruylopez. 1812 indeed.
Feb-20-05  iron maiden: <ruylopez900> Canada didn't defeat America in 1812; the U.S. soldiers either lost their nerve, or they were too dimwitted to realize that they were actually supposed to go INTO Canada. That year and 1862 were probably the most embarassing in America's military history.
Feb-20-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <IMlday> <francescog> Have either of you reported the error using the "suggest your correction" facility?
Feb-20-05  aw1988: Actually, this is not entirely correct. I believe the cause for the American defeat was this:

First off, Canada, or BNA (British North America) was vastly inferior to the USA. We would have gotten "owned" if under normal circumstances.

You have surely heard of Napolean, the brilliant strategist. Well, by one event or another he put a blockade around England, making sure no one could get in nor out. Well, since England had the greatest navy they took a leaf out of Napolean's book... they set up a blockade around Europe entirely!

So we have a double blockade, one inside the other, when Napolean invades Russia. A fatal mistake no doubt, as you all know what happened. The depleted French army quickly turned back, but now they were so weak they got destroyed by the Allies.

With France defeated, England could now send troops to BNA in order to help us from the advancing American army. We obviously could not defeat them ourselves; we were merely french farmers!

That's a summary, but of course to study this- as of every history- is fascinating, and I do recommend it.

Sep-08-05  lentil: chessgames.com the scoresheet is blank! i'm dying of curiosity!!
Sep-08-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: Try it now.
Sep-08-05  RookFile: Too bad, it looks like Reshevsky was clearly better, but the old man lost his way.
Sep-12-05  lentil: chessgames.com: thank-you!
Mar-29-09  lentil: final annotation makes no sense. B already has a R on e6.
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Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
Great Snake Variation?
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a26
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A10 English: Great Snake [White]
by chess.master
Suttles wins big.
from Canadian Games by ruylopez900
Round 8, Board 8 (Tuesday, April 22)
from Lone Pine 1975 by Phony Benoni


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