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Samuel Reshevsky vs Laszlo Szabo
Zurich Candidates (1953), Zurich SUI, rd 4, Sep-05
Gruenfeld Defense: Brinckmann Attack. Grünfeld Gambit (D83)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 16 times; par: 47 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Nov-01-06  Resignation Trap: Laszlo Szabo wrote:

"This round fell on a Saturday, and since Samuel Reshevsky wished to play only after the end of the sabbath, all of those paired with him on Saturdays agreed to start play late. Calculating that that I would not have to wait long after the start of the round at 5:30 PM, I took the bus to go sight-seeing with the others. But Reshevsky was late (as it turned out he attended divine service in Zurich), and the chief arbiter, Karel Opocensky , started the clock of the American Grandmaster at eight o'clock. My opponent showed up three-quarters of an hour later and demanded that the clock be reset, otherwise he would not sit down to play. He was composed and I was agitated, since I had already spent more than three hours in the hall and its surroundings. And waiting like that is worse than spending the time playing. Naturally, I stuck to my guns (I still do not understand why I, the competitor, was discussing this point), and then the Czechoslovak chief arbiter turned to an "impartial judge". He managed, unfortunately, to convince me, through different arguments, that I should begin playing at ten o'clock. (I will never forgive myself.) The result was never in doubt with such a frame of mind; I lost the game soon after midnight. Why have I retold this story? Mainly because it had a great effect on the game I played with Reshevsky in the second part of the tournament, which I wanted to win--after this--at any cost."

"The nineteenth round was the 'crowning' of my performance (or should I use the term: 'decrowning'?) when I met Reshevsky again...."

For the conclusion of this story by Szabo, see Szabo vs Reshevsky, 1953 .

Jul-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessical: This was a game of cutting edge theory at the time. Szabo had booked up on the Grunfeld in preparation for the tournament. The book move was <14.Bc4> but Reshevsky's move improved on the Yugoslav analysis.

For a better return for Szabo's theoretical preparation see: Stahlberg vs Szabo, 1953


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