chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing


register now - it's free!
Mikhail Tal vs Bent Larsen
"A Bent Pin" (game of the day Apr-28-10)
Tal - Larsen Candidates Semifinal (1965)  ·  Sicilian Defense: Scheveningen. Tal Variation (B82)  ·  1-0
To move:
Last move:

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 102 times; par: 58 [what's this?]

Annotations by Iakov Damsky.

explore this opening
find similar games 38 more Tal/Larsen games
sac: 16.Nd5 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: If you find a mistake in the database, use the correction form. There is a link at the bottom that reads "Spot an error? Please suggest your correction..." Avoid posting corrections in the kibitzing area.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with the default chess viewer, please see the Pgn4web Quickstart Guide.

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 13 OF 13 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Johnnysaysthankyou....But these people using computers have no friggen clue because they're just spewing the moves that the comp gives them.>

This is all too often the case, and becomes especially presumptuous when they lampoon top GMs' play with the help of that silicon assistant.

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: Indeed Perfidious, but my particular favorite is when someone like Kasparov who puts immense weight into computers tries to analyze a player like Tal. I'm skeptical that any of Tal's sacrifices have truly been proved "unsound". I modeled my style after him, and have become an incredibly strong player since I started. Analyzing his games have become easy for me, and I have always analyzed without computers. I know positions in the Najdorf where the Nd5 sacrifice is sound, so I actually see no reason why it shouldn't be here. The thing people forget is that material alone can't win you the game. Material only matters once the initiative dries up, so when I analyze Tal's games, I always try to keep a positional initiative. Some may have trouble going through my analysis, which I did in my head on my phone, now that I'm back at my computer, let me show you using charts a few critical positions.


click for larger view

This is the critical position in the f5 Bd8 line. I don't think it's possible to defend. If it is, I haven't found a single line that confirms that it is. Even if you get to a position that looks like this.


click for larger view

Black is in trouble. This sacrifice happens to be completely sound.

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <I'm skeptical that any of Tal's sacrifices have truly been proved "unsound".>

How about this one?

Tal vs Korchnoi, 1958


click for larger view

<my particular favorite is when someone like Kasparov who puts immense weight into computers tries to analyze a player like Tal.>

Kasparov had been world champion for a decade before computers got really good.

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < Johnnysaysthankyou: I just realized that the person I was responding to was discussing 17...g6. I was discussing 17...f5 where I think black has better chances with a move like Bd8.(you have to be willing to be down 2 minor pieces to objectively win) In response to 17...g6 I would just play 18.f5. I guarantee you if black is now toast. You can't take cause I'll play Qh5, you can't play Nc5 cause I'll play Qh5. You probably can't do anything.>

Not even 17....Bxg5+?

Burgess, Emms and Nunn's <The World's Greatest Chess Games> spend about a page on White's alternatives after 17....g6, but they don't mention 18.f5, presumably because they thought it was a terrible move.

Also, if 17....g6 18.f5 Nc5 19.Qh5, what is your plan after Black takes the queen?

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: Black cannot take white's queen as it is blocked by white's f pawn. That is the point of f5...


click for larger view

If black takes the light squared bishop the rook takes and it is even harder to defend.

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: Keypusher I am very the reason it was not considered was because neither Burgess, Em, or Nunn play like Tal. To them, a profound move like f5 might be overlooked because of a sequence like Bxg5+ Kb1 Nxd3 and if Rxd3 then Bxf5 forks queen and rook with very little followup. But on Nxd3 white has the remarkable Rhg1 where on Bxf5 Qxf5 Rxg5 is checkmate.
May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <johnnysaysthankyou>

OK, from your diagram 1....Nxd3+ 2.Rxd3?? Bxg5+ 3. Kb1 Bxf5 and White can resign.

<Johnnysaysthankyou: Keypusher I am very the reason it was not considered was because neither Burgess, Em, or Nunn play like Tal. To them, a profound move like f5 might be overlooked because of a sequence like Bxg5+ Kb1 Nxd3 and if Rxd3 then Bxf5 forks queen and rook with very little followup. But on Nxd3 white has the remarkable Rhg1 where on Bxf5 Qxf5 Rxg5 is checkmate.>

Your continuation is impossible, because if 18.f5 Bxg5+ 19.Kb1 the knight is still on d7 and can't play ...Nxd3.

Assuming you mean 18.f5 Nc5 19.Qh3 Bxg5+ (of course 19....Nxd3+ wins on the spot, especially if White retakes with the rook) 20.Kb1 Nxd3 21.Rhg1, Black's not going to play ....Bxf5. Instead he'll play something like ...f6 threatening ...Bxf5 for real.

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: Nxd3 without Bxg5+ is not a good idea as after 19...Nxd3 20. Rxd3 Bxf5 and white has Qh6, after which black must play f6, to prevent checkmate. Then white can play Rf3 where Rxf5 is threatened. If the black moves white can play pawn takes winning on the spot.
May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Johnnysaysthankyou: Nxd3 without Bxg5+ is not a good idea as after 19...Nxd3 20. Rxd3 Bxf5 and white has Qh6, after which black must play f6, to prevent checkmate. Then white can play Rf3 where Rxf5 is threatened. If the black moves white can play pawn takes winning on the spot.>

I'll say it one last time, Johnny.

18.f5 Nc5 19.Qh3 Nxd3+ 20.Rxd3 Bxg5+ 21.Kb1 Bxf5.

If 22.Qh6 Bxh6.

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: Except the move Rxd3, as I have said multiple times, is an inferior move. However, there is a winning move and it is Kb1.

Since you seem to have trouble comprehending my lines I'll post a diagram.


click for larger view

Now if Bg5+, white has time to get in Rhg1 and if something silly like Bxf5, simply Qh6 and I don't envy black's chances. Moves like f6 and Rhc1 are coming. The position ends up looking like this.


click for larger view

I see no defense here.

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Johnnysaysthankyou: Except the move Rxd3, as I have said multiple times, is an inferior move. However, there is a winning move and it is Kb1.>

Johnny....scroll down the page.

< Johnnysaysthankyou: Black cannot take white's queen as it is blocked by white's f pawn. That is the point of f5...

click for larger view
If black takes the light squared bishop the rook takes and it is even harder to defend.>

Rxd3 was your idea.

I'm having a hard time comprehending your lines because they lose instantly, are impossible or both.

Taking up your latest line:

18.f5 Nc5 19.Qh3 Nxd3+ 20.Kb1 then the <silly> 20....Bxf5 and if 21 Qh6 just ...Ne5 saving the knight, blocking the diagonal and leaving Black two pieces up for no compensation whatsoever.

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: Taking all this seriously for a moment, after 18.f5, 18....Nc5 doesn't seem like a very good move, not because of 19.Qh3, which appears to be quite hopeless, but because it allows 19.f6 with a clamp on the kingside. Black would presumably do better to play something like 18....Bxg5+ 19.Kb1 Ne5.
May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <Johnnysaysthankyou> However, there is a winning move and it is Kb1.>

After 17...g7 18.f5 Nc5 19.Qh3 Nxd3+ 20.Kb1 we reach the position you indicated:


click for larger view

Now Black has at least 3 winning moves according to Komodo 9.2:

(1) The "silly" 20...Bxf5 when if 21.Qh6 then 21...Ne5 and with White's DSB's diagonal blocked there is no mate and it's all over for White. After 20...Bxf5 Komodo evaluates the resulting position at [-9.76], d=25, considering that White's best is 21.Qg3 Ne5 22.Rd2 Qc7 23.h4 Be4 24.Rf1 Qc4 25.Rf4 Qxd5 26.Bc3 Qb5 27.Bd4 Bf5 28.b3 Rac8 29.Qf2 Rfe8 30.Bb2 Qc6 31.Qg2 Qxg2 32.Rxg2 a5 33.Re2 Bf8 34.h5 Nc6 35.Rxe8 Rxe8 36.Bf6 Re1+ 37.Kb2 Bg7 38.Bxg7 Kxg7, but the exchange of queens after 31.Qg2 is equivalent to resignation.


click for larger view

(2) 20...Ne5 immediately. Then Komodo evaluates the resulting position at [-8.75], d=25 after 21.Rhf1 Bxf5 22.Rxf5 gxf5 23.Qxf5 Qc8 24.Qe4 Qg4 and if White now exchanges queens by 25.Qxg4 Nxg4 his attack is over and Black's material advantage will be decisive. If White tries to avoid the queen exchange by 25.Qe1 (with the rook hanging there is no other choice besides 25.Qh1) then 25...Bxg5 and White has no good way to continue his attack. Heck, even 25...Qxd1+ probably wins since Black is effectively a piece ahead.

(3) 20...Nf4. Then after the White queen moves 21...Nh5 prevents it from reaching h6 and there is no mate. Komodo evaluates the resulting position at [-7.14], d=25 after 21.Qh4 Nh5 22.Rhf1 a5 23.b3 a4 24.Bb2 a3 25.Ba1 Qb6 26.Bd4 Qb5 27.Ba1 Qc5 28.Bd4 Qc7 29.Ba1 Rb8 30.Qd4 f6 31.fxg6 hxg6 32.gxf6 Nxf6 33.Qg1 Kh7 34.Qg2 Bg4 35.Rde1 Rbc8 36.Rf2


click for larger view

This last line seems like a silly sequence with all the Black pawn and queen moves and White's bishop moves (22...Qc7 would probably have accomplished the same thing) but it is at least indicative that White has no way to force its attack through.

Your analyses would have more credibility if you posted specific lines rather than generalities like "if something silly like Bxf5, simply Qh6 and I don't envy black's chances." Or "Moves like f6 and Rhc1 are coming."

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: I have a refined sense of fantasy and know how to win games with positional compensation. My lines look ridiculous, saccing pieces left and right to create positions where only a few are used to mate, but I learned this from the magician himself. Sometimes, because I largely analyze in my head, and quickly at that, I can miss things. Your Bxg5+ Kb1 Ne5 line is not a bad idea, but fails immediately to Bxe5 dxe5 f6. Here, I LIKE your idea of clamping on the kingside, because here there is no g pawn. With the g pawn on the board, black is more likely to defend, but without it, I don't think white is likely to crack black before black can organize his forces and defend.


click for larger view

Threatening h4.


click for larger view

And if you're wondering why an immediate f6 will lose white the game in this position, check out 19...Re8!! Black is threatening to equalize after 20.fxe7 Nxd3 21.Rxd3 Rxe7. As if that weren't enough,if white tries to keep his pawns on the board for an attack, Bf8 puts an end to any queen foray and buy's black enough time to start his own queenside march. But, if black tries something similar without the g pawn on the board, he ends up getting crushed. From this position:


click for larger view

White will just play h4, h5 and exchange for the g pawn. If black gets cheeky, the position ends up looking like this.


click for larger view

If black refuses to take(hxg6 leads to Bxg6 fxg6 f7+!), and White is smart, he'll play Qh5 immediately, ending the game.

May-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: @AylerKrupp

A few things. I highly doubt Komodo's lines work, but I will take the time to look them over.

The thing you have to remember about this position that Komodo cannot possibly understand is that black's kingside structure is very weak. If white constricts black's h pawn and controls the f6 square, there should be nothing black can do to prevent mate. Nontheless, if black can get his queen to Qc7 and somehow remove the g pawn while freeing the 7th rank, he can defend. This is a tall order, but my judgement is that it can be done...if white messes up. White's goal is much simpler, he just wants to get a rook and queen to the h file. That's all he wants. As long as the g pawn is restricting black, there is nothing that can be done once that is achieved.


click for larger view

1) With the move Ne5, black does not even come close to completing his goal, but brings white a hell of a lot closer to completing his. 22. Rhf1! deserves an exclamation point. White will eventually put his rooks on the e and f files and put pressure on the black knight. Black's snoozing queenside won't even come into play if white does it right.

Black has to get active, so a good move for him to play might be 22.Bxc2+! But white doesn't need to complicate. All he needs to do is play Ka1 and after Bxd1, Rf4. White has an unstoppable threat of Rh4 and black can't stop it. Sadly for this sequence, all the lines end this way. I recommend playing out of a few of the positional concepts against Komodo and seeing what it says. If my suspicions are correctly, it will swing wildly once you hit on the correct line and get close enough that it has a whiff of what's happening to it.

2)Ne5 immediately sounds like a good idea. Preserve the knight, block the DSB, and the f5 pawn is still pinned. I surveyed the lines resulting from Ne5 for a long time while writing this up. I was using plans like opening the g or h files but they don't seem to work, it only ends up helping black. Instead, Keypusher has the right idea. After Ne5, Qh6 followed by f6 seems the correct plan. Meaning I was probably wrong about the bishop sacrifice stopping white's machinations in another line. From this position:


click for larger view

An example might be 23...Nf3 trying to rid black of his dark squared bishop on black's terms. 24. Qf4 Nxd4 25. Rxd4 and if 25...Qc7 26. h4 Bb7 27. h5 Rac8 28. Qh2 Re5 29. hxg5 fxg5 30. Rh4 wins.

3)I'm not gonna give a long commentary on this one cause it just loses. From this position:


click for larger view

22... fxg6 23. Rde1 Bd8 24. Rhf1 and there is nothing black can do.

May-02-16  beatgiant: <Johnnysaysthankyou> I find a lot to disagree with in your posts above, but I'll start with your latest and work backwards:


click for larger view

22...fxg6 23. Rde1 Bd8 (not my choice, but let's stipulate it) 24. Rhf1 (end of your line) and now at least 24...Rxf1 25. Rxf1 Bf5 26. Rxf5 Bb6 27. Bxb6 Qxb6. Black is still a piece up and it looks like White's attack is out of steam. I'm not even sure that's Black's best defense there, but at any rate I don't think you can just claim "there is nothing black can do."

May-02-16  beatgiant: <Johnnysaysthankyou> Slight correction, the knight on h5 is supposed to be Black in the diagram above


click for larger view

and the line from there is 22...fxg6 23. Rde1 Bd8 24. Rhf1 Rxf1 25. Rxf1 Bf5 26. Rxf5 Bb6 27. Bxb6 Qxb6.

May-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <1) With the move Ne5, black does not even come close to completing his goal, but brings white a hell of a lot closer to completing his. 22. Rhf1! deserves an exclamation point. White will eventually put his rooks on the e and f files and put pressure on the black knight. Black's snoozing queenside won't even come into play if white does it right.

Black has to get active, so a good move for him to play might be 22.Bxc2+! But white doesn't need to complicate. All he needs to do is play Ka1 and after Bxd1, Rf4. White has an unstoppable threat of Rh4 and black can't stop it. Sadly for this sequence, all the lines end this way. >

22....Bxc2+? 23.Ka1?? Bxd1 24.Rf4 Bh5. The "attack" is over and Black has ...Rc8 and ...Bf8, winning the queen. White can't even play 25.Rh4 Rc8 26.Rxh5, because 26....Rc1 is mate.

May-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: Oops. Guess you have to play Kxc2. And on Qc7+ move back to b1. But maybe I analyzed too hastily in assuming there was some kind of threat after Rc1. What is black trying to accomplish? Why can't I just play Rf2 and when he plays Rfc1 I play Rd3. On Bf8 I play Qh4 and on a5 I play Rh3? In light of this Bxc2 no longer seems like a good line, but I'm at a loss what black is going to do because the threat of Rxf5 Rd3 threatening Rh3 is too strong.
May-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Johnnysaysthankyou: Oops. Guess you have to play Kxc2. And on Qc7+ move back to b1. But maybe I analyzed too hastily in assuming there was some kind of threat after Rc1. What is black trying to accomplish? Why can't I just play Rf2 and when he plays Rfc1 I play Rd3. On Bf8 I play Qh4 and on a5 I play Rh3? In light of this Bxc2 no longer seems like a good line, but I'm at a loss what black is going to do because the threat of Rxf5 Rd3 threatening Rh3 is too strong.>

Sorry, Johnny, there's no saving this for White. From the top:

18.f5 Nc5(?) 19.Qh3? Nxd3+ 20.Kb1? Bxf5 21.Qh6 Ne5 22.Rhf1 Rc8 (better than 22....Bxc2+) 23.Rd2.

Now Black can just play 23....Bf8. After Qh4, Black's other bishop covers h3, so there's no threat of mate on the h-file even if White could somehow get a rook to h3.

But Black doesn't even have to play ...Bf8. 23....Qb5 hits the rook on f1, and if White tries 24.Rf3 then 24....Bxg5! 25.Qxg5 Nxf3 forking queen, rook, bishop and the back rank. If 26.Qg2 then 26....Nxd2+ 27.Qxd2 Qf1+ 28.Qc1 Bxc2+ 29.Ka1 Qxc1#.

If White defends c2 with the other rook (23.Rf2) then black has 23....b3 and again White gets killed on the queenside: 24.axb3 Qxb3 25.Rdd2 Bf8 26.Qh4 Nc4.

May-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Johnnysaysthankyou: I'm not following you...Where does the move Rd2 come from? It's an awful move and obviously just a placeholder, but what a place to put it! If you can't find a good continuation let me get to a computer and I'll look at the line on a viewer. I'm certain I looked at your line and found Rxf5 followed by some kind of took lift that can be stopped. I'll let you know.
May-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Johnnysaysthankyou> The thing you have to remember about this position that Komodo cannot possibly understand is that black's kingside structure is very weak.> (part 1 of 2)

I don't know on what basis you say that Komodo cannot possibly understand that black's king side structure is very weak. Pawn structure and king safety are fundamental factors in any engine's evaluation function, and the importance (weights) of these factors relative to other factors has been tested over 10s of thousands of games. It strikes me that perhaps you don't understand how chess engines work, or have a mistrust of them like several others on this site. Fair enough, but that's no reason to doubt the accuracy of their evaluations.

And you tend to talk in generalities and ideas, which is fine when you are trying to formulate plans, but proper evaluation of lines of play require calculation. The best ideas and plans will not work if there are tactical issues that prevent their implementation. Since you say that you generally (and quickly) analyze in your head, I would suggest that you set up the pieces on an actual board and try to find the best moves by both sides. I know that this is one of my greatest failings; I usually come up with good plans and good moves for the side I'm playing, but I am much less successful in identifying my opponent's best responses and so I tend to overestimate my chances. Optimism is fine, but it can be counterproductive if you are not objective and don't consider your opponent's best moves in addition to your own best moves.

For example, in this position you give 22.Rhf1 a "!" claiming that White will eventually put his rooks on the e and f files and put pressure on the black knight.


click for larger view

But White will never get a chance to do that, White's king is no safer than Black's and perhaps even less so. After either 22...Qc7 or 22...Rc8 Black will take the initiative since White must respond to the threats against his king. Remember that Black is 2 pieces ahead and can give up one or both of them if it means achieving a superior position. And Black can even give up its queen for a rook to blunt White's attack and still remain sufficiently ahead in material to ensure the win.

May-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Johnnysaysthankyou> The thing you have to remember about this position that Komodo cannot possibly understand is that black's kingside structure is very weak.> (part 2 of 2)

After either of those 2 moves (22...Qc7 or 22...Rc8) the immediate attempt to open up the g-file by 23.Rxf5 doesn't work. For another engine's perspective this is what Stockfish 7 had to say about it at d=33:

1. [-12.39]: 22...Qb5 23.Rxf5 gxf5 24.Qh5 Rfc8 25.Bxe5 dxe5 26.Qf3 Qd7 27.h4 Bd6 28.Qd3 a5 29.h5 a4 30.Rd2 e4 31.Qd4 Qb5 32.g6 hxg6 33.hxg6 Bc5 34.c4 bxc3 35.Qf6 c2+ 36.Rxc2 Qf1+ 37.Rc1 Qxc1+ 38.Kxc1 Bd4+ 39.Qc6 Rxc6+ 40.dxc6 fxg6 41.b3 axb3 42.axb3 Rc8 43.Kd1 Rxc6 44.Kd2 Kf7


click for larger view

2. [-12.36]: 22...Rc8 23.Rxf5 gxf5 24.Qh3 Qb5 25.Qe3 Qxd5 26.h4 Nf3 27.Qd3 Nxh4 28.Bf2 Qxd3 29.Rxd3 Bxg5 30.Rh3 Ng6 31.a3 bxa3 32.Rxa3 f4 33.Ra5 Ne5 34.Rd5 Rab8 35.b3 Rc6 36.Rd1 Nc4 37.Rg1 h6 38.Ka2 Ne3 39.c4 Rcc8 40.Be1 Kh7 41.Bd2 Bf6 42.Bc1


click for larger view

3. [-10.55]: 22...Qc7 23.Rxf5 gxf5 24.Qh3 f4 25.Qg2 f3 26.Qf2 Rac8 27.h3 Qc4 28.Rd2 Qxd5 29.Bxe5 Qxe5 30.Qxf3 Rc5 31.h4 Qe1+ 32.Qd1 Qxd1+ 33.Rxd1 Rc4 34.Rh1 Rfc8 35.Rh3 Rxc2 36.a3 d5 37.axb4 Rc1+ 38.Ka2 R1c4 39.b5 axb5 40.Kb1 f6 41.Rd3 Rd8 42.gxf6 Bxf6 43.Rb3


click for larger view

In all cases Black beats off White's attack and with his great material advantage is ensured of an easy win.

Again, I did no forward sliding nor did I check out what other engines have to say (I typically use at least 3 engines to analyze a position so that if one engine misses a good move there is a pretty good chance that the other engines won't) so I don't know if these are the best moves by both sides but complex tactical positions like this one are chess engines' main strength so I would be reasonably confident in their evaluations and their early moves.

Without considering your opponent's best moves no plan or general ideas are worth anything. It's not hard to win a game if your opponent doesn't make the best moves. It's not easy to always consider your opponent's best moves but chess is not an easy game to master.

May-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Johnny>

I was talking about the diagram you posted below. Here it is again.


click for larger view

22.Rhf1 Rc8 threatening c2.

Now you complain about me suggesting 23.Rd2, but defending c2 with 23.Rf2 isn't any better, as I already pointed out:

23....b3 24.axb3 Qxb3 (threatening ....Bxc2+) 25.Rdd2 Bf8 26.Qh4 Nc4 (threatening ...Na3+ and ...Nxc2). If 27.Rxf5 Nxd2+ 28.Ka1 Qa4#.

May-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: Going all the way back to 17....g6 18.f5 Bxg5+ 19.Kb1 Ne5 20.Bxe5 dxe5 21.f6


click for larger view

This is interesting to me, because it's a slightly more realistic line than most of what we've been looking at because if 18.....Nc5(?) White would surely continue with 19.f6, not 19.Qh3. Also, frankly, because it's not instantly losing for White like most of the other variations on the page.

But it still seems quite hopeless. 21....Qd6 blocking the pawn on d6 and threatening the pawn on f6. If 22.Rdf1 just 22....Bf4 and the pawn is doomed, and White doesn't seem to have anything for it: 23.h4 Bd7 24.h5 Qxf6 and ?

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 13)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 13 OF 13 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
WC #8 - unviewed...
from Famous games of the Chess World Champions by trumvirvel
A positional knight sac.
from sahmattr's favorite games by sahmattr
sapientdust's favorite games
by sapientdust
Tal's Immortal
from Best Chess Games of All Time by Timothy Glenn Forney
Tal's Immortal
from Immortals by underdoggum
andyatchess' favorite games
by andyatchess
Game collection: TAL
by chessdeviant
10
from 125 Greatest Chess Games by ghardy1988
Tal! tactical genius
from Conbinaciones - Tal - Entre movimientos by jricardoduran
Sacrifício para a vitória
from Partidas de Xadrez by adalav
007chess' favorite games
by 007chess
A Lot Can Happen On 64 Squares
by wandererofmars
sicilian defense
from benjobench's tal games by benjobench
Knight Sacrifice on E-file
from Mikhail Tal by Medusa
The World's Greatest Chess Games- 100 Games
by 50movesaheadofyou
good middlegame
from onammano's favorite games by onammano
invisible barrier=control w.o. occupation
from unique themes by kevin86
Game 67: The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal
from The tT Players (Bonus Addition) by fredthebear
#6-Candidates Match (game 10) Bled 1965 (54/303)
from Heavy Pieces Hound Pawn Row and/or Back Rank by fredthebear
125 Partidas Brilhantes
by Gottschalk
plus 263 more collections (not shown)


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2016, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies