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Bartlomiej Macieja vs Eduardas Leovich Rozentalis
100th US Open (1999), Reno, NV USA, rd 8, Aug-19
Russian Game: Modern Attack. Center Variation (C43)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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find similar games 3 more Macieja/Rozentalis games
sac: 20...Bxh2+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-14-07  TrueBlue: very difficult! I saw it up to move 30 (with a chessboard). And at move 30 (i.e., 4 moves later) it is still a good puzzle how black can progress. Personally, I didn't like 31. Qf4.
Apr-14-07  ginsta: <gambitfan> The two-game collection illustrating the queen's diagonal power are really very instructive. I would say that it is wonderful endgame training material..!! Thanks for drawing my attention to them
Apr-14-07  ikalel: I got it. Last week's Saturday puzzle was harder than this one. Be4 or Kf4, both lose.
Apr-14-07  Marmot PFL: I also found the main idea, that white could not interpose on e4, but could not find a win after that. Playing it with a draw in hand is not bad, and than look for the win if you have enough time left.
Apr-14-07  MasterSavely: Well, it was quite difficult but after like 5 mins of thinking i noticed the rook sacrifice.... and queen check+pawn take... then the winning the rook and kicking him in black's base.
Apr-14-07  Rubenus: What will Sunday be if this is Saturday??????
A mate in 100 in an endgame R+K vs N+K?

The actual game is wonderful. I would like to know if Short and Dembo can see it all.

Apr-14-07  BadTemper: 20. Qxd8+ must be winning... no?
Apr-14-07  gambitfan: <ginsta> If you enjoy the power of diagonals, I also created a special collection dedicated to ♗+♘+T against ♕+♙♙...

Game Collection: BISHOP+KNIGHT+ROOK//QUEEN+2 PAWNS

Apr-14-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <BadTemper>: 20. Qxd8+ Rxd8 21. Bxe4 Qh4 22. Rfe1 (22. f3? Bxh2+ 23. Kh1 Bg3+ 24. Kg1 Qh2#) Qxh2+ 23. Kf1 Qh1+ 24. Ke2 Qh5+.
Apr-14-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  fm avari viraf: It's real difficult to find the right combination as there are many variants. Nowadays, most of the top players do their home work very well so they can out play their adversaries. It would not be a surprise if Rozentalis prepared this line athome.
Apr-14-07  MostlyAverageJoe: < Peligroso Patzer: Rozentalis had said the entire attack had been worked out in his home preparation>

I am confused. Did they go home after move 26 and resume the next day? Where is the starting point for the home analysis?

Apr-14-07  MostlyAverageJoe: <mkrk17: Simply too tough. Can someone tell me what is the expected rating of a person who can solve this type of puzzle>

The minimum required ELO to solve this puzzle can be conservatively estimated as somewhere between a gazillion and a bazillion.

Incidentally, since I started my experiment in using a computer engine to determine puzzle difficulty, this is the first puzzle that HIARCS11.1 was NOT able to solve within 10 seconds on its highest ELO setting.

Apr-14-07  Timex: I got this one, but I didn't get the whole combo
Apr-14-07  Whack8888: Interestingly, I actually got this one, sort of. I geuss it doesnt count since after Qxf2 I just assumed that Black was winning
Apr-14-07  MostlyAverageJoe: HIARCS tells me that white could save himself two moves before the puzzle position thus:

26.Be4

and trade the bishop for an opportunity to get the king into (relative) safety while pushing the d pawn to create a significant threat. This seems like a very non-human move, no?

I don't trust the engine here, because while tactics at each step appear to be very good, the overall strategy may not be. Criticisms welcome. The subsequent line proposed by the computer looks like this:

26. ... f5 27. Ke2 fxe4 28. d6 Qh5+ 29. Ke1 e3 30. d7

At this point, the position is very interesting, as each side is a move away from an immediate disaster (black to move):


click for larger view

The best move for the black is unclear: either Qa5+ or exf2. The first one evaluated slightly higher, and resulted in another position where black's choices are plentiful:

30. d7 Qa5+ 31. Ke2 Qh5+ 32. Kd3 Qf5+ 33.Kc4 Rd8 34. fxe3 Qc2+ 35. Kd5


click for larger view

Just the mainline from this point onward:

35... Rh5 36. Ke6 Qc5 37. Qe4 Qb5 38. Qf4 Re8 39. dxe8=Q Qxe8 40. Kd6 Qd8 41. Kc6 Qc8 42. Qc7 Rc5 43. Kxc5 Qxc7 44. Kd4 Qxg3 45. b3 Qg2 46. Ra1

and HIARCS thinks it is a draw:


click for larger view

Apr-14-07  get Reti: I wonder what happens after 30.Bf5. The combination after 30...gxf5 is very aesthetically pleasing. The f-pawn shields the king and moves off the g-file. 31.Kf6+ is a discovered check, which mates after 31...Kf7 Qg7 mate!How tactical! I still don't see how to stop Bf5.
Apr-14-07  MostlyAverageJoe: <get Reti: I wonder what happens after 30.Bf5>

Whatever USCF rules say that should happen after an illegal move.

Apr-14-07  independentthinker: Why not 27 ... Qd5+ without the rook capture? What does the rook capture achieve other than an exchange of rooks?
Apr-14-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  dzechiel: <MostlyAverageJoe: "Peligroso Patzer: Rozentalis had said the entire attack had been worked out in his home preparation."

I am confused. Did they go home after move 26 and resume the next day? Where is the starting point for the home analysis?>

This means that Rozentalis had been studying this opening during his preparation for the tournament (possibly even for this opponent) and had seen the position after 27 Qg4 as a possible line that might occur. He then had all the time he needed to study the rook sac on f2 and the possible responses by white.

There was another game features in "New In Chess" about six months ago in which a player pulled off a spectacular sacrifice against his opponent and won a beautiful game. He then opened his lap top computer and showed his home analysis that spanned the entire game and beyond (his opponent resigned before his home analysis gave out).

Apr-14-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: A brilliant finish!! Black gives up A rook to be captured in two ways-both bad. The king chase is equally exciting and comedic.

A good name for this one:Roz rolls!

Feb-20-09  FiveofSwords: uh...completely honestly I think that some of you guys should know that the rxf2 sacrifice etc. was something that I saw almost instantly. But this is probably because its has a very petroffy tactical feel and i have studied and played many games in the petroff so my brain may be sorta well tuned for it. It would NOT be necessary for some human to have prepared these tactics, its not even necessary that they be some world class player. If you have problems seeing tactics like this then you can improve your ability at it with various means. And yes, this is not the only example of tactics I have seen which strong programs take a long time to find. In some specialized cases humans can actually calcualte much better than a computer, when they are familiar with certain thematic ideas.
Sep-20-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: Taking another look at this remarkable game, I believe that White's position became lost after <26. Qd7?>.

After 25. ... Re8, Macieja needed to play: <26.Be4!> (blocking the e-file). This would have enabled White to emerge with a small edge after a continuation such as: 26...f5 27.Ke2 Qh5+ 28.Kd2 fxe4 29.Kc1. After the inaccurate 26. Qd7?, however, Black was winning by force.

Sep-20-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: Here is some analysis of the critical positions from this game as worked out with Fritz7:

<1. e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.d4 Nxe4 4.Bd3 d5 5.Nxe5 Nd7 6.Nxd7 Bxd7 7.0-0 Bd6 8.c4 c6 9.cxd5 cxd5 10.Qh5 0-0 11.Qxd5 Bc6 12.Qh5 g6 13.Qh3 Ng5 14.Bxg5 Qxg5 15.Nc3 Rae8 16.Rad1 Re7 17.d5 Bd7 18.Ne4 Rxe4 19.Qxd7 Rd8 20.Qxb7 Bxh2+ 21.Kxh2 Rh4+ 22.Kg1 Qh6 23.g3 Rh1+ 24.Kg2 Rh2+ 25.Kf3 Re8 26.Qd7?> [White needed to play: 26.Be4; for example, 26...f5 27.Ke2 Qh5+ 28.Kd2 fxe4 (White would get a winning advantage after 28...Rxe4? 29.Qb8+ Kf7 30.Qxa7+ Re7 31.Qb6 ) 29.Kc1 and White is slightly better] <26...Qh5+! 27.Qg4> [Losing faster would be 27.g4 Qh3+ 28.Kf4 Rxf2+ 29.Rxf2 (29.Kg5 h6#) 29...Qe3#] <27...Rxf2+! 28.Rxf2> [or 28.Kxf2 Qxg4 ] <28...Qxd5+ 29.Kf4> [or 29.Be4 Qxd1+ 30.Re2 f5 31.Qf4 Qf1+ 32.Ke3 Rxe4+ 33.Qxe4 fxe4 ] <29...Qd4+ 30.Kg5 Qxf2 31.Qf4> [31.Kh4 Re5 32.Bf5 Qh2+ 33.Qh3 Qxb2 34.g4 gxf5 35.Rd8+ (35.gxf5 Re4+ 36.Kg5 [36.Kh5 Qe2+] 36...Qg7+ 37.Kh5 h6 ) 35...Kg7 36.Qg3 Re4 ] <31...Qc5+ 32.Bf5 Qe7+ 33.Kh6> [If 33.Kg4 Qe2+ 34.Kh3 (34.Qf3 gxf5+) 34...Qxd1 35.Be4 Qh5+ 36.Kg2 Qe2+ and Black emerges with an extra Rook.] <33...f6! 34.Bxg6> [If 34.Rd7 Qf8+ and MATE NEXT.] <34...Qg7+> and <WHITE RESIGNS>. 0-1

Black would have a big material advantage after: 35.Kh5 Qxg6+ 36.Kh4 Re4

Sep-20-09  WhiteRook48: 37 Rd8+ does not work
Feb-14-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: 10..0-0 is a gambit developed by Yusupov that gives Black a promising lead in development. 20 Qxb7 was new; 20 Qxd8 had been played in Luther-Alterman Recklinghausen 1998 (not included in this database). In playing 26 Qd7? Macieja clearly missed Blacks 27 move; Rozentalis recommended 26 Be4..f5 27 Ke2..Qh5+ 28 Kd2..fxe 29 Kc1..Qf5 30 g4..Qf4+ 31 Kb1..Rb8 32 Qe7..e3 with chances for both sides.

<"Peligroso Patzer: Rozentalis had said the entire attack had been worked out in his home preparation.">

That is really useful information - the concluding attack, while pretty, seems fairly obscure - it just seems unlikely that someone would find 27..Rxf2+! at the board.

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