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Jose Raul Capablanca vs Eugene Aleksandrovich Znosko-Borovsky
"Dominant Gene" (game of the day Jul-23-13)
Savorin Cup (1913)  ·  French Defense: McCutcheon. Exchange Variation (C12)  ·  0-1
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Last move:

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Given 29 times; par: 53 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-07-04  Whitehat1963: One of Capablanca's rare losses with white. Capa's on the attack throughout, then the tide turns suddenly. Where did he go wrong?
Jan-07-04  ughaibu: Whitehat1963: Here's an amusing one: Capablanca vs E Corzo, 1901
Jan-07-04  Shadow 812: To Whitehat1963
In response to your question, this game
appears in a book titled "The Unknown Capablanca" by David Hooper and Dale Brandreth, published by Batsford books in 1974. They say that 28. c4? is weak because it weakens the d3 square and that Nc4! was stronger. They also go onto say that Capablanca's
35th move Rxd3?? was probably the move that lost the game, and suggest this possible line instead: 35. Qd4 Re2
36. Qxd3 Re1
37. Rxe1 Qxe1+
with fair drawing chances
However this analysis really needs to be tested further.
Dec-20-04  Whitehat1963: One of Capa's rare losses as white in a game that features the opening of the day.
Dec-06-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: And another major upset with the MacCutcheon Variation. What is it about this opening?
Feb-11-06  Caplasker: 35 R X P

This position is most interesting. I lost here my last chance to win the game, and if that is true it would vindicate my judgment when, on move 28, I played P-B4. The student can find out what would happen if white plays Q-Q4! at once. I have gone over the following variations: 35 Q-Q4, RxKRP (of course if RxBP, P-Q8 wins); 36 QxQP! R-Q1; 37 Q-R6, K-Kt1 best (if Q-Q5ch; K-R1, K-Kt1; R-QKt1 wins; 38 QxBP and White will have at least a draw. - J.R. Capablanca
Chess Fundamentals
P. 180

Jul-28-06  Knight13: Annotating this game, one of his rare losses, Capablanca claimed that 35. Qd4! Rxh2 (35...Rxc5? 36, d8=Q) 36. Qxd3! Rd8 37. Qa6 was very good for White. However, while this may well be the case in the event of 37...Qe4+ 38. Ka1 Kb8 39. Rb1 and 37...Kb8 38. Qxc6 when "White will have at least a draw" (Capablanca), 37...Qe6! leads to an odd position where it is difficult for either side to do very much, e.g. 38. g4 f5 or 38. Rd3 f5 39. Nd2. --- Tactics and Strategy by G. Burgess
Sep-15-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: This game is one of fourteen illustrative games in Capa's book: "Chess Fundamentals."
Oct-10-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  dorsnikov: znoskoborovsky isn't held in high esteem as far as chess masters go. yet he wasn't a bad player at all. anyone who can sit down across from capablanca, one on one, fair and square and beat him knows how to play a darn good game of chess. i'd like to have only half of znoskoborovsky's chess insight.
Jul-07-10  RandomVisitor: 35.Qd4 Qe2 36.Qxd3 Rb2+ 37.Kc1 Rd8 white still has problems.
Jul-07-10  RandomVisitor: 32...Rd8 or 33...Rd8 are good for black.
Jul-07-10  RandomVisitor: 27.Qf2 f5 28.Qd4 Rc8 29.Rb3 Rc7 30.c4 is good for white.
Jul-07-10  RandomVisitor: After 26...Nd5:


click for larger view

Rybka 3:

[+1.68] d=23 27.Qf2 f5 28.Qd4 Rc8 29.Rb3 Rc7 30.c4 Ne7 31.Kc2 Rec8 32.Qb2 h5 33.Nb7 Rb8 34.Nd6 Rxb3 35.axb3 Nc8 36.Qc3 Nxd6 37.cxd6 Rd7 38.c5 Qb8 39.b4 Qb5 40.Kb3 Rd8 41.Qc4 Qb7 42.Ra1

[+1.59] d=23 27.Qd4 Rc8 28.Rb3 Rc7 29.Nc4 Rb8 30.Nd6 f5 31.c4 Rxb3 32.axb3 Ne7 33.Kc2 Nc8 34.Qd2 Nxd6 35.cxd6 Rd7 36.c5 Qc8 37.Ra1 Rd8 38.Qd4 Qd7 39.Kc3 h6 40.Qf6 Rb8 41.b4

Mar-30-11  Eluveitie: dorsnikov: half? I've read his little book "how not to play chess" and it help me a lot in my chess career, he may not be that good as other masters like capa but he managed to be one of the russian grandmasters in his time isnt it enough?
Nov-01-11  pmukerji: Instead of 26. dxc5 I think 26. Nxc6 would have been somewhat stronger...i.e. inserting the queen on the diagonal and bringing the rook in from below I think would've been killer. I think this variation might even be winning for white.
Aug-16-12  pedro123: I wonder if Mr Eugene Aleksandrovich Znosko-Borovsky ever had to sign on.

A bit of a shame that he didn't live long enough to play Mr Roman Yakovlevich Dzindzichashvili really.

Aug-16-12  erniecohen: <Knight13: Annotating this game, one of his rare losses, Capablanca claimed that 35. Qd4! Rxh2 (35...Rxc5? 36, d8=Q) 36. Qxd3! Rd8 37. Qa6 was very good for White. However, while this may well be the case in the event of 37...Qe4+ 38. Ka1 Kb8 39. Rb1 and 37...Kb8 38. Qxc6 when "White will have at least a draw" (Capablanca), 37...Qe6! leads to an odd position where it is difficult for either side to do very much, e.g. 38. g4 f5 or 38. Rd3 f5 39. Nd2. --- Tactics and Strategy by G. Burgess>

Both Capablanca and Burgess got this one wrong. After 35. Qd4 Qe2 36. Qxd3 Rb2+ 37. Kc1 Rd8 38. Qxe2 Rxe2 it is Black who has a probable win; he is up an exchange for a pawn, has a R on the 7th rank, and the d7 pawn will soon fall.

Jul-23-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Who should we believe out of Capablanca and Ernie Cohen?
Jul-23-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Hi <Eluveitie> I also read the book "How not to play chess" by Znosko-Borovsky. A very good little book.

He also wrote a less well known book:

"How not to make chess puns"

**********

Jul-23-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Apparently this is a good opening to play in simuls: Steinitz vs McCutcheon, 1885.
Jul-23-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <pedro123: I wonder if Mr Eugene Aleksandrovich Znosko-Borovsky ever had to sign on.

A bit of a shame that he didn't live long enough to play Mr Roman Yakovlevich Dzindzichashvili really.>

Lionel Adalbert Bagration Felix Kieseritsky and Dr. Jana Malypetrova Hartston Miles Bellin would also have been worthy adversaries.

Jul-23-13  KlingonBorgTatar: World Champs French Fried at Big Mac's

Stenitz - MacCutcheon simul 1885 ( the original recipe, see above) Capa - Znosko (this page)
Alekhine - EJ Diemer Simul 1934
Euwe - Castaldi Venedig 1948

Fischer- Petrosian Curacao Ct 1962

:-)

Jul-23-13  inmate5: <erniecohen: Both Capablanca and Burgess got this one wrong. After 35. Qd4 Qe2 36. Qxd3 Rb2+ 37. Kc1 Rd8 38. Qxe2 Rxe2 it is Black who has a probable win; he is up an exchange for a pawn, has a R on the 7th rank, and the d7 pawn will soon fall.> At the end of your line, 39. Nd4 screams to be played. However, black can miraculously escape with 39... Rxa2 after 40 Nxc6 Ra1+ 41. Kc2 Rxd1 or 40. Kb1 Ra6 (if I am not mistaken).
Jul-23-13  Ratt Boy: I first saw this game almost 50 years ago, in Capa's excellent *Chess Fundamentals*. In a world where chessmasters tend so show off their crushing wins in their own books, Capa was classy enough to include a few of his rare losses. Fischer did the same in his classic *My 60 Memorable Games*. He was a nut, but that book is great.
Jul-23-13  KlingonBorgTatar: To complete the cast of The Tournament of Illustrious Names, here are some more entries: Baron Tassilo Von Heydebrandt und Von der Lasa, Mme Contessa Chantal Chaude du Silans, Count Alberic O'Kelly de Galway, Aleksander Fyodorovich Ilyin-Zhenevsky, Mikhail Aleksandrovich Bonch-Osmolovsky . :-)
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