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David Bronstein vs Saitek Brute Force (Computer)
Aegon (1994)  ·  Caro-Kann Defense: Breyer Variation (B10)  ·  1-0
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find similar games 1 more Bronstein/Saitek Brute Force game
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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-15-04  zb2cr: The machine blew its zap on move 17. Really--just gave away a piece for nothing. I think 17 ... g6 might have been more to the point.
Jun-15-04  Knezh: Correct me if i am wrong but 17... g6 self destructs due to Bxf7+ and if 18... Kxf7 then 19. Qxh7+ and 20. Bh6+
Jun-15-04  MoonlitKnight: <Knezh> I think you're right. The comp found out that he was lost and decided to play foolishly just to make it look like he threw the game.

I love it when human intellect beats brute force!

Jun-16-04  zb2cr: <Knezh>, I said it was more to the point, I didn't say it saved the game. Besides, I was looking at the line as 17 ...g6; 18 Bxf7+, Kxf7; 19 Qxh7+, Kf6; 20 Qh6 and I didn't see an immediate end.

Now that I think about it, this is a fairly typical example of what computer chess programmers call the "horizon effect". I remember reading a paper on this back in about 1980. This happens when a program evaluates out to a fixed depth (say 4 full moves). If, in all the branches it finds something very bad happening within its "horizon", then the program will make an obviously bad move such as throwing away a piece. That's because the capture of the piece pushes the very bad variations "over the horizon" of the fixed depth of moves searches. But I had thought this problem was already considered solved in the paper I read in 1980!

Jun-16-04  xqdashi: This problem is not an easy one to solve although there have of course been attempts to lessen the effect. For instance, better algorithms and various improvements on searching the move tree (e.g. pruning, etc.) allowing enhanced search depth, pushing the horizon out further. And also, some strategies like increasing the search depth for more forcing sequences, etc.
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Featured in the Following Game Collection [what is this?]
Bronstein vs Computers.
by lostemperor


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