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Samuel Reshevsky vs Yuri Averbakh
Zurich Candidates (1953), Zurich SUI, rd 18, Oct-03
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Reshevsky Variation (E46)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-04-05  WhoKeres: A game of iron logic. In Bronstein's book on Zurich 1953 he says that Reshevsky considered this his best game in that tournament. It's easy to see why!
Oct-26-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  zydeco: Bronstein's very impressed at how slowly and methodically white builds the attack. Averbakh needed to counterattack earlier: with ....c5 and later ....b4.
Feb-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Reshevsky vs Averbakh, 1953

<CONTROL OF THE CENTER LETS YOU ATTACK ON THE FLANK>


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[White "Reshevsky"]
[Black "Averbakh"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Ne2 d5 6. a3 Be7 7. cxd5 exd5 8. Ng3 Be6 9. Bd3 Nbd7 10. O-O c6 11. Bd2 Re8 12. Qc2 a5 13. Nce2 Nb6 14. Nf4 Bd7 15. Rfe1 Bf8 16. f3 Bc8 17. Rac1 g6 18. Nfe2 Bg7 19. h3 a4 20. e4 dxe4 21. fxe4 Be6 22. Be3 Bb3 23. Qd2 Nfd7 24. Bg5 f6 25. Be3 Nf8 26. h4 Bf7 27. h5 Ne6 28. Rf1 Bf8 29. Rf2 Nd7 30. Rcf1 c5 31. d5 Nc7 32. hxg6 hxg6 33. Rf4 b5 34. Rh4 Ne5 35. Kh1 Qd7 36. Rxf6 Ng4 37. Bg5 Bg7 38. Rf4 Ne5 39. Bf6 Bxf6 40. Rxf6 Kg7 41. Qg5 Rh8 42. Nf5+ Qxf5 43. Rxf5 Rxh4+ 44. Kg1 1-0

Feb-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: Reshevsky vs Averbakh, 1953


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30 ♖c1-f1


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<zydeco: <<<Bronstein's very impressed at how slowly and methodically white builds the attack.>>> Averbakh needed to counterattack earlier: with ....c5 and later ....b4.>

Feb-06-14  SChesshevsky: Maybe Averbakh could've improved with some sort of Rook or Queen move between 11.. Re8 and 35...Qd7.

It looks like he never did get his Rook off a8. I wonder if there was ever a GM 30+ move victory where the winner never moved their QR?

May-17-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: 5 Ne2 was first played by Rubinstein but is often referred to as the Reshevsky variation as he played it numerous times. 8..Be6 was a new move but it has not been repeated; 8..c5 and 8..Re8 are the main lines. Black's setup with 10..c6!? was very passive; he had no active counterplay. Kasparov thought that 24..f6!? was "not the best choice". Averbakh finally played 30..c5 but way too late as Reshevsky's kingside attack was too far along. 35..Qd7? was a blunder; Bronstein had recommended 35..b4 but it was then pointed out that 36 Bxc5! is a strong response; ie. one pretty line is 36..g5? 37 Bxf8..gxh 38 Bg7!..Ng4 39 Nf5 and wins. Kasparov pointed out that the best defense was 35..Ra6 36 Bh6..Qe7 37 Bxf8..Qxf8 with an unclear game. 36 Bxc5! would have been stronger than Reshevsky's 36 Rxf6. Averbakh could have made things tougher first with 36..Be7 37 Bg5..Qd8 and then with 40..Qe7.
May-17-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: Reshevsky was very strong on the white side of the Nimzo. He put up numerous wins against some of the biggest names in chess history as white.
May-17-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <RookFile: Reshevsky was very strong on the white side of the Nimzo. He put up numerous wins against some of the biggest names in chess history as white.>

That's very interesting because I believe we could all learn a lot from very talented prodigies such as Reshevsky, Panno and Capablanca.

If he had a plus score then that leads me to suspect that the Nimzo may be a bit weak.

I've never played it anyway.

May-17-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: Some random examples:

Reshevsky vs Fischer, 1961

Reshevsky vs Euwe, 1953

Reshevsky vs Najdorf, 1957

Reshevsky vs Kashdan, 1942

May-17-16  thegadfly: Reshevshy's play is so simply in the opening. It reminds me of Capablanca.
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