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Viktor Korchnoi vs Anatoly Karpov
"Unkorched" (game of the day Nov-02-2008)
Karpov - Korchnoi World Championship (1978), City of Baguio PHI, rd 17, Aug-26
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Normal Variation. Bishop Attack (E47)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-03-14  DrChopper: Maybe but he decided to not fight vs a so easy prey. Anyway, interpret whatever you want but we will never know what Fischer was really thinking and feeling.
Sep-21-14  RubinSteinitz: Isn't this the game where the Zukhar affair come to a head? Korchnoi left his clock running and threatened to punch the paraphsychologist in the nose for giving him the evil eye. Victor claimed the Soviets had Zukhar tuned into Korchnoi staring him into a nervous wreck. Korchnoi had an advantage in the game but began to lose the thread and eventually the game due to "The Evil Eye." Up to move 39, Korchnoi had a draw in hand but then blundered into a mate in 3.

Sep-21-14  Olavi: <RubinSteinitz: Isn't this the game where the Zukhar affair come to a head? Korchnoi left his clock running and threatened to punch the paraphsychologist in the nose for giving him the evil eye.>

Yes, and "The main development was Ms. Leeuwerik's new habit of trying to distract him by kicking his shins and jabbing the small of his back with a pen." Raymond Keene

Sep-21-14  domradave: I saw this game on public television.
The host, Shelby Lyman, was stunned by the conclusion. I saw the conclusion recently in a chess
puzzle book and knew it immediately!
Poor Korchnoi!
Feb-24-16  joseamaraldasilva: how about ukrainian ,stonian and latvian colaboration with germans in the concentration camps doing the dirty work ,that the "superior race " didn,t want to endure ? That,s too a historic fact .
Feb-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sularus: my favorite swindle
May-02-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <joseamaraldasilva: how about ukrainian ,stonian and latvian colaboration with germans in the concentration camps doing the dirty work ,that the "superior race " didn,t want to endure ? That,s too a historic fact .>

Some of the men from those countries considered themselves German. Many of the others did not like Russians, for various reasons. I imagine that some were psychopaths, or guys that wanted money.

<Tout le monde a ses raisons.>

May-02-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < offramp: <joseamaraldasilva: how about ukrainian ,stonian and latvian colaboration with germans in the concentration camps doing the dirty work ,that the "superior race " didn,t want to endure ? That,s too a historic fact .> Some of the men from those countries considered themselves German. Many of the others did not like Russians, for various reasons. I imagine that some were psychopaths, or guys that wanted money.

<Tout le monde a ses raisons.>>

Based on what they actually did, it appears the people they <really> didn't like were Jews.

May-02-17  Howard: Seirawan annotated this tragic (for Korchnoi) game in one of his books. He stated at the end that when Korchnoi resigned, Oscar Panno and Michael Stean (the latter was one of Korchnoi's seconds) just sat in their seats stunned. It was five minutes before they were finally able to get up and leave.
May-02-17  Petrosianic: It shouldn't have been a total shock. With those Knights swarming, a possible mate was obviously in the air.

It was a surprise to me when I first saw it because I was laboring under the illusion that White was still winning. Now I can see that he's got almost no winning chances. The pawns either won't be able to advance, or in the worst case for Black, he'll be able to give up a Knight for them and reach a drawn ending.

I think White's last chance to win is 30. Nc2, protecting the Bishop. After 31. Nf3, Black gets two pieces for Rook and Pawns, which looks good for White, but isn't really. But after Nc2, Black's Kingside pawns are going to fall while Black picks up the a pawn, and this should win.

Exchanging the Queens on Move 23 wasn't the best, either. White can keep them on with Rb5, or even Rb8+, then Rb5. White's king is actually safer at this point in the game.

May-02-17  althus: Most things I've seen about this game opine that the twelve minutes Korchnoi lost at the beginning of it while arguing with the arbiters about Zukhar were fatal to him. If he hadn't done that with his clock ticking, they say, he likely wouldn't have lost.

I don't know how true this is. Korchnoi was a time trouble addict to begin with. Who's to know for sure, but.. still. It doesn't sound that convincing to me.

Having done a deep dive into the history of this match lately, it's surprising how unsurprising the offboard antics come to feel once you've got used to them.

May-02-17  Petrosianic: <Most things I've seen about this game opine that the twelve minutes Korchnoi lost at the beginning of it while arguing with the arbiters about Zukhar were fatal to him.>

Maybe, but if he had found any of the wins he'd had earlier, he wouldn't have thrown away the draw at the end.

May-02-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Here Karpov proves the old adage that the king is a fighting piece.

His king goes on a rampage starting with move 25

Jan-21-18  Mazymetric: Fischer was the one who worked like dogs.
According to Kasaprov, Players with strong intuition: Capablanca, Smyslov, Karpov, Petrosian, Spassky. Players with relatively poor intuition: Steinitz, Botvinnik, Euwe, Fischer.
Jan-21-18  WorstPlayerEver: Lol no Tal?
Jan-21-18  Granny O Doul: Yes, a rook and two knights are a force. See this game: Steinitz vs Bird, 1895
Jan-22-18  Mazymetric: <WorstPlayerEver: Lol no Tal?> Players with a strong specific intuition, operating in sharp situations where material and positional equilibrium was disturbed: Lasker, Alekhine, Tal, Kasparov, Chigorin, Korchnoi who in early 1960s was called 'Tal in reverse'.
Jan-22-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: To see Fischer and Korchnoi classified thus is highly interesting; against this assessment, I offer a portrait which includes both of those titans, courtesy of Larsen, from a 1972 interview he gave Hugh Alexander:

<Analytic power and positional insight vary very much for different Grandmasters. Smyslov and Petrosian never liked to analyze complex positions very much, Tal obviously does it very well and Korchnoi's whole play is based on analysis. If you are Smyslov or Petrosian then you have such positional understanding that you can avoid many complications and dangers and the need for so much analysis. Analytical power improves very much with practice; you learn to find what is critical in a position, what is worth analysing - you see which pieces are active, where the weak points are. When you don't know what to analyse, you sit there for a long time, picking variations almost at random. Tal and Korchnoi were probably born with a greater gift for analysis than I was and I was born with a greater gift than Smyslov and Petrosian; and in positional insight it is the other way round. Korchnoi is fantastic at calculating complex variations, especially when he is hard pressed; but he must analyze because his judgment when he doesn't calculate is very bad - he has to get through a lot of variations before he knows what's happening. Of course many things that worry the ordinary player are not problems at all for a Grandmaster; but in the difficult positions Spassky has said "Korchnoi is always wrong". Maybe a strong point of Fischer is that he is good both at analysis and in judgment - though Tal can calculate better and possibly Korchnoi also.'>

Tata Steel (2014)

Jan-22-18  john barleycorn: <perfidious: ...<Korchnoi is fantastic at calculating complex variations, especially when he is hard pressed; but he must analyze because his judgment when he doesn't calculate is very bad - he has to get through a lot of variations before he knows what's happening...> ...>

That I think was also the point in Spassky's joke about Korchnoi:

<[Spassky] began to list Korchnoi's many qualities: ...Killer Instinct (nobody can even compare with Victor's 'gift') ...Phenomenal capacity to work (both on the board and off the board) ...Iron nerves (even with seconds left on the clock) ...Ability to Calculate (maybe only Fischer was better in this department) ...Tenacity and perseverance in Defense (unmatched by anyone) ...The ability to counterattack (unrivaled in chess history) ...Impeccable Technique (Flawless, even better than Capa's) ...Capacity to concentrate (unreal)
...Impervious to distractions during the game
...Brilliant understanding of strategy
...Superb tactian (only a few in history an compare with Victor) ...Possessing the most profound opening preparation of any GM of his generation ...Subtle Psychologist
...Super-human will to win (matched only by Fischer) ...Deep knowledge of all of his adversaries
...Enormous energy and self-discipline

Then Boris stopped, and just looked at me, begging for me to ask the question that needed to be asked....

I asked: 'But, Boris, what does Victor lack to become world champion?'

Boris' answer floored me:

''He has no chess talent !''>

Jan-22-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <john b>, since reading the 'no talent' comment by Spassky, I have also felt that was the point of it.
Jan-22-18  john barleycorn: <perfidious> yes, that is the kind of humour one must like. I remember similar kind of humour by Merle Travis already been an accomplished artist and Chet Atkins looking for a record contract.

Chet had a rehearsal at a record company and his playing was immediately accepted. Then the guy in charge asked Chet : "Can you sing?" And Chet answered "I cannot sing". The guy asks again "Can you sing?" Chet said "None". The guy lets the cat out of the bag: "We are looking for a guy that plays the guitar and sings as good as Merle Travis." And Chet said "Oh, I can sing that good"

Jan-22-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: Hmmm..I like the way Spassky puts it.

I remember kind of reversed story when I once spent a week with the late Tony Miles,and one evening in a restaurant I asked what he thought was Kasparovs weak spots.Miles bowed his head and thought for around 30 seconds and I qoute litterally:"Well,perhaps,he sometimes is too optimistic".

Jan-22-18  john barleycorn: <moronovich> like in boxing when the coach tells his boxer: "I have discovered your opponents weak point, he neglects his defense everytime he send you to the floor."
Jan-22-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <john barleycorn> Lol!
Jan-22-18  nevski: Through essentially the combination of the bold advance of his king ,a vigorous attack of his cavalry and the excellent positioning of his rook, Karpov decided the game.
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