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Viktor Korchnoi vs Anatoly Karpov
"Unkorched" (game of the day Nov-02-08)
Karpov - Korchnoi World Championship (1978)  ·  Nimzo-Indian Defense: Normal Variation. Bishop Attack (E47)  ·  0-1
To move:
Last move:

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Given 15 times; par: 56 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Mar-22-14  Conrad93: Karpov has never appealed to me.

In an interview Fischer said that most of the elite players are not that good, they just happen to work like dogs, and I think Karpov falls into that category.

He had no natural talent. He was just a by-product of the Soviet machine.

Mar-22-14  Conrad93: His chess lacks the brilliance and smoothness of Fischer.
Mar-22-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Jim Bartle: Seirawan was a Korchnoi second, and wrote how it was to watch Korchnoi bungle a strong position into a seemingly impossible loss.>

Seirawan was not a second to Korchnoi when this match was played, a role he assumed in 1980.

Mar-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <Conrad93: Karpov has never appealed to me.

In an interview Fischer said that most of the elite players are not that good...>

Well, Fischer had some kooky views but here it sounds as if you may have misquoted him.

If "elite" players are not that good, then who is good? The players beaten by the elites?

Makes no sense. Someone has to be good at chess, if not from an absolute perspective (compared to a super engine) at least from a relative standpoint (compared to other humans).

Mar-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  RookFile: Anything is possible, but I don't remember Fischer saying this.
Apr-03-14  Conrad93: Fischer was talking abut natural talent.

Players like Karpov are just the by-product of the Soviet machine.

Give any decent chess player the same resources, and they would be at the same level.

Apr-03-14  Conrad93: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPlX...
Apr-03-14  Howard: "Perfidious" is correct in that Seirawan was not Korchnoi's second in the 1978 match, but he was in the 1980 Candidates matches, as well as in the 1981 W.C. against Karpov.

Keene and Stean were the seconds in the 1978 match.

Apr-03-14  Petrosianic: <Keene and Stean were the seconds in the 1978 match.>

That's correct.

Apr-03-14  john barleycorn: <In an interview Fischer said that most of the elite players are not that good.>

he said "not that talented but they work like dogs".

Apr-03-14  DrChopper: Well, if there is a guy who was gifted in the last decades, it was Karpov. He has a great understanding of the game like Capablanca and didn't need to work as much as others did. When you see his games, it's not his deep preparations and calculations that you see, it's more about his understanding of the position and his technique. Anyway, he dominated the game for so much time and was still fighting hard against the top players in the 90s. He's with Kramnik, one of the few who has a good record vs Kasparov, it says a lot. You can say that you don't like his style but don't say he wasn't brilliant; you can't argue against results.
Apr-03-14  Conrad93: He would probably put Karpov in that category.
Apr-03-14  DrChopper: Maybe but he decided to not fight vs a so easy prey. Anyway, interpret whatever you want but we will never know what Fischer was really thinking and feeling.
Sep-21-14  RubinSteinitz: Isn't this the game where the Zukhar affair come to a head? Korchnoi left his clock running and threatened to punch the paraphsychologist in the nose for giving him the evil eye. Victor claimed the Soviets had Zukhar tuned into Korchnoi staring him into a nervous wreck. Korchnoi had an advantage in the game but began to lose the thread and eventually the game due to "The Evil Eye." Up to move 39, Korchnoi had a draw in hand but then blundered into a mate in 3.

Sep-21-14  Olavi: <RubinSteinitz: Isn't this the game where the Zukhar affair come to a head? Korchnoi left his clock running and threatened to punch the paraphsychologist in the nose for giving him the evil eye.>

Yes, and "The main development was Ms. Leeuwerik's new habit of trying to distract him by kicking his shins and jabbing the small of his back with a pen." Raymond Keene

Sep-21-14  domradave: I saw this game on public television.
The host, Shelby Lyman, was stunned by the conclusion. I saw the conclusion recently in a chess
puzzle book and knew it immediately!
Poor Korchnoi!
Feb-24-16  joseamaraldasilva: how about ukrainian ,stonian and latvian colaboration with germans in the concentration camps doing the dirty work ,that the "superior race " didn,t want to endure ? That,s too a historic fact .
Feb-05-17  Sularus: my favorite swindle
May-02-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <joseamaraldasilva: how about ukrainian ,stonian and latvian colaboration with germans in the concentration camps doing the dirty work ,that the "superior race " didn,t want to endure ? That,s too a historic fact .>

Some of the men from those countries considered themselves German. Many of the others did not like Russians, for various reasons. I imagine that some were psychopaths, or guys that wanted money.

<Tout le monde a ses raisons.>

May-02-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < offramp: <joseamaraldasilva: how about ukrainian ,stonian and latvian colaboration with germans in the concentration camps doing the dirty work ,that the "superior race " didn,t want to endure ? That,s too a historic fact .> Some of the men from those countries considered themselves German. Many of the others did not like Russians, for various reasons. I imagine that some were psychopaths, or guys that wanted money.

<Tout le monde a ses raisons.>>

Based on what they actually did, it appears the people they <really> didn't like were Jews.

May-02-17  Howard: Seirawan annotated this tragic (for Korchnoi) game in one of his books. He stated at the end that when Korchnoi resigned, Oscar Panno and Michael Stean (the latter was one of Korchnoi's seconds) just sat in their seats stunned. It was five minutes before they were finally able to get up and leave.
May-02-17  Petrosianic: It shouldn't have been a total shock. With those Knights swarming, a possible mate was obviously in the air.

It was a surprise to me when I first saw it because I was laboring under the illusion that White was still winning. Now I can see that he's got almost no winning chances. The pawns either won't be able to advance, or in the worst case for Black, he'll be able to give up a Knight for them and reach a drawn ending.

I think White's last chance to win is 30. Nc2, protecting the Bishop. After 31. Nf3, Black gets two pieces for Rook and Pawns, which looks good for White, but isn't really. But after Nc2, Black's Kingside pawns are going to fall while Black picks up the a pawn, and this should win.

Exchanging the Queens on Move 23 wasn't the best, either. White can keep them on with Rb5, or even Rb8+, then Rb5. White's king is actually safer at this point in the game.

May-02-17  althus: Most things I've seen about this game opine that the twelve minutes Korchnoi lost at the beginning of it while arguing with the arbiters about Zukhar were fatal to him. If he hadn't done that with his clock ticking, they say, he likely wouldn't have lost.

I don't know how true this is. Korchnoi was a time trouble addict to begin with. Who's to know for sure, but.. still. It doesn't sound that convincing to me.

Having done a deep dive into the history of this match lately, it's surprising how unsurprising the offboard antics come to feel once you've got used to them.

May-02-17  Petrosianic: <Most things I've seen about this game opine that the twelve minutes Korchnoi lost at the beginning of it while arguing with the arbiters about Zukhar were fatal to him.>

Maybe, but if he had found any of the wins he'd had earlier, he wouldn't have thrown away the draw at the end.

May-02-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Here Karpov proves the old adage that the king is a fighting piece.

His king goes on a rampage starting with move 25

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