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Vladlen Yakovlevich Zurakhov vs Abram Davidovich Zamikhovsky
UKR-ch (1959), Kiev, rd 8
Slav Defense: Modern Line (D11)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 35.Rh6+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-05-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  cu8sfan: Cool! This is one of the puzzles I didn't calculate through. I just figured that after 35.♖h6+ the White pawns would be strong enough to march through. Very nice.
Aug-05-05  Averageguy: This one isn't too challenging. all you have to notice is that to prevent 38. f7+ Rxf7 39. exf7#, black must move his bishop, after which white plays 38. e7, and the pawn cannot be stopped.
Aug-05-05  Goku X: This one was pretty easy to find.Its pretty obvious that the pawns must win the game so i found Rh6 + :D The pawns are unstoppble
Aug-05-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  cu8sfan: With yesterday's (well, sort of...) and today's puzzle being fairly easy I wonder if the theme of the week is <Monday Puzzles>! (-:
Aug-05-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: If you didn't find the win for *all* of black's possible moves, then you didn't solve it. (I didn't think of 37...Rg7 until afterward.)
Aug-05-05  2ndNature: <al wazir> In principle you are right - solving a puzzle means calculating/seeing moves untill the win is obvious. The problem is that in case of today's puzzle some people thought that the win was obvious when other people would keep on calculating deeper variations. And the funny think is that their shallower analysis is part of the solution - hence they claim they got it. To be honest, I think they are not so far from being correct - if during a real game you find winning move without actually seeing all possible variations and you still win this game then nobody will question your ability of winning.

Aug-05-05  Jack Kerouac: Wonder how Robert's doing in Iceland these days? Any one have news?
Aug-05-05  DanRoss53: Just like me to miss the killer, but get everything right up to it. I saw that White is better after 35. ♖h6+! gxh6 36. g6+ ♔g8 37. f6 ♗g7 38. f7+?! ♔f8 39. ♗d6+ ♖e7 40. ♗xc5 and ignored 38. e7! altogether. After my line, White would have his work cut out for him, but the King and Rook are both pinned in that position, so it should be (in theory) a won game.
Aug-05-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I saw Rh6 (it seemed the idea - opening the B diagonal etc) first then thought B:g7 was the move but I only studied it for a few minutes: so didn't 'get it' as such - got the main ideas though .... a good conbination to promote a pawn and win
Aug-05-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I think - contrary to the oft expressed comment "how many of us would get it OTB?" its easier to find some of these things in actual play as it's then one is really concentrating and fired up to get a point...
Aug-05-05  I Pawn You: Chessgames...you never read what I type anymore. I feel that our relationship is not -quite- what it used to be...I ask one simple question, yet you, choose to ignore me, as if we're back to the first week of our relationship, when you were playing it hard to get, and making me feel infererior. Triple frownie for you - :( :( :(
Aug-05-05  Eric Xanthus: Thanks for all the lines on 35Rxg7+. In the light of day I can see what I was thinking--if 35.Rxg7+ Bxg7 36.Bxg7 Kxg7 37.f6+ Kg6 I was planning 38.e7 Kf7 39. g6+. As you have all shown me, black can improve at every step of this line. My midnight muse was a mirage.
Aug-05-05  Shokwave: I'm happy....I got it, saw the winning lines in both main lines, and got it quite fast to boot. I don't think this one was as easy as some folks claim, though; witness the number of people who tried Rxg7+. I looked at that, Bxg7, f6 and e7 before trying Rh6+, but it took just a few seconds apiece to discard the other moves...still, I think this was a tough enough puzzle for Friday.
Aug-05-05  HastyMover: I got this without too much difficulty. Knowing that there is a win for white definitely helps. In a real game, I don't think I would have seen it. I didn't have a chance to analyze 35....Kg8 line much. I'm not sure I know what happens after 35.Rh6+ Kg8 36.g6 ... It seems black has a couple of options besides Re7...
Aug-05-05  sharpnova: i've actually had a similar position occur in a game before so this was an easy puzzle for me. seeing the f7 mate makes this a lot easier to calculate
Aug-05-05  carpedieumjoe: got everything right....took me quite some time...almost gave up too...lolz but sumthing i dun understand....
35) ....Kg8 ?
Aug-05-05  lentil: Why not just decline the sac with ..Kg8. W wins a pawn and Black looks bad, but it's not over yet.
Aug-05-05  zb2cr: <lentil> Look back to <Boomie>'s earlier comment re: 35. ... Kg8.

After 36. g6, gxh6; 37. f6 transposes
back to the game.

The line that <Boomie> gives is based on 36. ... Re7; 37. Rxh5, later followed up by Rh7, Bd6, and e7.

To add a little, if Black plays 36. ... Be7; 37. Rh7 forces the Bishop back to f8 ( 37. ... Bf6; 38. Bxf6! ).

Aug-05-05  zb2cr: More on the 35. ... Kg8; 36. g6 line.

After 36. ... b4; 37. Rh7, c4; 38. f6, gxf6; 39. Rxb7 neither 39. ... fxe5 nor 39. ... c3 works.

36. ... c4; 37. Rh7 is not worrisome, nor is 36. ... d4; 37. exd4, cxd4; 38. Bxd4 since in each case the Bishop stays on the critical long diagonal.

Aug-05-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I figured this one out almost immediately-though over the board,I couldn't have gotten this one in a thousand years.

It's strange how helpless a rook and a well placed bishop are against three steamrolling pawns!

Aug-05-05  xxdsdxx: The goal here is obviously to promote one of the 3 passed pawns. The White Rook can start a trade down but will leave the Bishop on the powerful diagonal a1-h8 and will disrupt the white pawn chain. I don't like that idea. Rh6+ gxh6...g7+ and the Black King has one move g8. f6 and the Black King is one move from mate (f7). Bishop moves to block mate and the e pawn goes to e7 and will promote. End of game...
Aug-05-05  MatrixManNe0: If I remember correctly from my recent studying, a rook against two connected passed pawns on the sixth rank almost always has the pawns in the winning position.

I spotted that the pawns were white's main advantage and remembering the principal of two connected passers beating a rook, I found Rh6 relatively easily.

In a game, I may have spotted this, though I could only have done it with the very recent research of the same ideas.

Aug-05-05  EXIDE: How about 35. Bxg7;BxB 36.RxB+;RxR
37.Pf6 and white will be able to promote one pawn to Queen setting up a Q vs. R ending.
Aug-08-05  zb2cr: Hi <EXIDE>,

After your line, 37. ... Kg8 looks like it stops the Pawns.

If 38. e7, Rxe7; 39. fxe7, Kf7; 40. g6+, Kxe7; 41. g7, Kf7.

If 38. Kg3, Rxg5+; 39. Kf4, Rg6;
40. Kf5, Rxf6+; 41. Kxf6, Kf8; 42. e7+, Ke8; 43. Kg5, Kxe7; 44. Kxh5, c4! and it looks like Black wins.

Improvements for White?

Nov-04-06  sharpnova: <Improvements for White?> yes. anyone but you doing the
analysis.
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