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Jaroslav Sajtar vs Max Dietze
Prague (1943), rd 16, Apr-??
Catalan Opening: Closed Variation (E06)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: Interesting. This may be one of those occasions when a little learning is a dangerous thing. Like many others, I immediately fixated on Rf6 to jam the f7 pawn in place. I suppose I've seen too many combinations where we stick a piece on f6, piece takes, pawn takes and then give mate on g7.

Qg6 is a much more elegant and unusual move. And if black had walked into it, we might have had the line that m'learned colleagues have pointed out 41.... fxg6 42. Rxf8 Kh7 43. h5


click for larger view

How painful for black. He is menaced by small fry (a bishop or h pawn), yet none of his heavy pieces can come to his aid. No-one can get to g6 quickly enough to prevent mate.

Now, let's do a quick straw poll. You are white in this position and black plays a pass move, say 43...a5.

You've got two choices - the logical and clinical 44. Bxg6# or the post-modern ironic 44. hxg6# Which do you play?

Will you be samurai honourable and despatch him with your bishop - a warrior's death?

Or will you be ninja-sneaky and garotte him in the dark with your h pawn?

What's it gonna be - bishop or pawn?

Oct-27-11  tbentley: It turns out to be a mate in 9:

41. Qg6 f5 42. exf6 e.p. Qxg3+ 43. Kxg3 Bc7+ 44. Kg2/h3 Bf4 45. Rxf4 Rc8 (or similar) 46. Qh7+ Kf8 47. Qh8+ Kf7 48. Qxg7+ Ke8 49. Qg8# or 45...e5 46. f7+ Rfxf7 47. Rxf7 Rxf7 48. Qxf7+ Kh8 49. Qf8#

Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: I missed 41 Qg6! (best) but I believe that 41 Rf6 should also win.

<<Sularus: 41. Rf6 c5 42. Rxh6 gxh6 43. Rf6

what is black's move 43?>

43..Bxe4 0-1 >

41 Rf6 c5 42 d5! should win easily - 42...ed5 43 Rxh6 gh 44 Bf5 with Qxh6 and Bh7+ to follow.

Taking on f6 also loses quickly - 41...Bxf6 42 ef6 followed by Rf4-g4

41...gf6 is no better 42 ef6 Bxf6 (Qg4+ and Qg7# was threatened) 43 Rxf6, again black can only delay mate for a few moves by throwing away material - 43...Rd5 44 Qxh6 Rh5 for instance

Oct-27-11  desiobu: Got stuck on <h5> in the main line and didn't get to the game line.
Oct-27-11  jackpawn: I'm proud of myself for being able to find the solution almost immediately.

I haven't played tournament chess in years, but now I wonder how I would do, especially if I would bother to study openings. I think my 'board sight' is definitely better. Of course nobody taps you on the shoulder during a game to tell you there's a tactical shot to find.

Oct-27-11  JCRchess: A beautiful attack for White. The h-pawn for White is the difference in this game, if its marching orders are needed, that is.
Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: School of thought it is the yeast will rise rf6 rule I on second thought qg6 re publish f5 exf black can do little in but squirm pet a thunderbolt Mr Dietze sub par happy queen cage Maxs king Jaroslav had ipso de facto open lines?
Oct-27-11  bachbeet: To answer Once's last question, I'd take with the pawn. Not because I wanted to be "ninja" but to use a pawn for mate when pawns usually don't get to be used that way.
Oct-27-11  chesssantosh: <sevenseaman: < chesssantosh: Is this a DIWALI gift?Thursday puzzles did not use to be so easy.>> but sevenseaman i disagree with you.though it is a subcontinental festival it is recognized in most parts of the world.

if it did not have any significance,why would British PM David Cameron and US president Barack Obama have celebrated it.i guess many people know about diwali,though not too much,maybe merely as a festival of light.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diwali...

Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  lost in space: I am very late today and I think I have nothing to add. Saw this quickly and without an trouble.

41. Qg6 fxg6 42. Rxf8+ Kh7 43. h5! and there is no way to avoid ether hxg6# or Bxg6# next move. Have a look how useless the black pieces are hanging around without any chance to interfere.

Only alternative I saw:
41. Qg6 f5 42. exf6 and again Black is helpless again.

Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: <chesssantosh> Speaking of politicians I read that in Prague Adolf Hitler showed up and personally greated each of the players. Imagine Bush or Obama doing that today.

Alekhine won the tournament but soon after moved to Spain. Better climate I guess.

Oct-27-11  TheBish: Sajtar vs M Dietze, 1943

White to play (41.?) "Medium"

My first hunch was that the best move was either d4-d5 or Bc1 (planning to sac on h6), but Black just replies 41...cxd5 to the first try, and 41...Rxd4 to the second. 41. Bg6 does nothing, since f7 is well guarded. Only after trying Bg6 did the solution hit me.

41. Qg6!!

The threat of mate on the spot does the trick. The obvious reply now is taking the queen, but we will look at all possible variations as Black is getting mated in all lines.

(A) 41...fxg6 42. Rxf8+ Kh7 43. h5 followed by 44. Bxg6# or 44. hxg6#.

(B) 41...Re8 42. Qh7+ Kf8 43. Qh8+ Ke7 44. Rxf7#.

(C) 41...f6 42. Qh7+ Kf7 43. Bg6+ Ke7 44. Qxg7+ Rf7 45. Qxf7#.

(D) 41...f5 42. exf6 Bxf6 43. Rxf6 Rxf6 44. Rxf6 and only a spite check (...Qxg3+) can delay mate on h7.

The queen sacrifice works because of the poorly placed Black pieces (Rf8 is only guarded by the king) and the well placed White pieces -- the Be4 and h4 pawn (after h4-h5) are all that are needed to deliver mate, after prying open the f-file (with queen decoy) for White's battery of rooks to seize the 8th rank.

Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: The material is even.

Black would probably consider an eventual ... c5.

The black castle shows a number of weaknesses (the light squares) and the rook on f8 is only defended by the king. This invites to play 41.Qg6:

A) 41... fxg6 42.Rxf8+ Kh7 43.h5 followed by 44.Bxg6#.

B) 41... Re8 42.Qh7+ Kf8 43.Qh8+ Ke7 44.Rxf7#.

C) 41... f6 42.Qh7+ Kf7 43.Bg6+ Ke7 44.Qxg7+ Rf7 45.Qxf7#.

D) 41... f5 42.exf6

D.1) 42... Bxf6 43.Qh7+ Kf7 44.Rxf6+ and mate soon.

D.2) 42... Rxf6 43.Rxf6 Bxf6 44.Rxf6 Rf7 45.Qh7+ Kf8 46.Qh8+ Ke7 47.Rxf7+ Kxf7 48.h5 + - with an extra bishop and attack.

D.3) 42... Rff7 43.Qh7+ Kf8 44.fxg7+ wins.

Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: The puzzle solution reminds me of Bronstein vs Geller, 1961.
Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <sevenseaman> On your comment: <Once that error occurs its quite easy to start believing in it. When we select defense moves we are not always meticulously careful in assigning the very best. It is human to see things go the way you wish them to go.

I have quite often made that very mistake and there was always a price to pay. Those slips have made me very wary and now I check and double-check> This sums it up very nicely and is why I'm delighted I happened onto 41.Qg6 instead of 41.Rf6...otherwise, I would've been very disappointed :)

Oct-27-11  Pawn Derous: Well, my first idea was to heap more threats onto black's gate at f7 with

41.Bg6 ? if Pxg6
then 42.Rxf8#
but Pf6 thwarts our plan!

41.Qg6 !! if Pxf6
then 42.Qh7#

while retaining the first mate
if Pxg6
then 42.Rxf8#

Oct-27-11  rilkefan: <This sums it up very nicely>

Isn't it irrelevant here, though? Rf6 and d5 or Bd3 appear won to me. Certainly finding the best move in the position is a laudable goal, but the better is the enemy of the good.

Oct-27-11  rapidcitychess: It's like picking between a vanilla milkshake, and a chocolate one. One is good, but the other is even better.
Oct-27-11  BOSTER: <The chief object of all opening is to get the pieces out quickly-off the back rank and into active play> Chernev.

But some "modern teachers" have another opinion.

Black played move 16...h6 in front of castled king -"a coffee-house move!", which created weakness that can never be restored,and black "g6" becomes a landing field for enemy troops.

In the <POTD> position this weakness gave the posibility to finish the game playing 41.Qg6. Did black think playing h6 about this?

Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Once> Honor, schmonor. Gimme that pawn.
Oct-27-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <Once> I just read Dietze's bio and the associated kibitzing. Vote changed to bishop.
Oct-27-11  nolanryan: this brings to mind an important lesson that I learned about my games. Sometimes you want to play, 42 .. f5, but I can't tell you how many times I've lost to 43 exf6. Therefore, next time you are playing black and thinking about playing 42 .. f5, don't forget about the possibility of 43. exf6.
Oct-27-11  stst: simple & soft:
41.Qg6 will do it.
Toughest resistance is 41...f6, but is met by 42.PxP e.p. BxP, 43.RxB RxR, 44. RxR etc and the Bk K is still locked@g8, no rescue to Qh7#
Oct-27-11  mohannagappan: i spot Qg6! very quickly,interesting
Oct-29-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <rilkefan> On your comment: <Isn't it irrelevant here?> I believe its been shown that Black can defend after 41.Rf6, though its a near-run thing. 41.Qg6 is much the better move, leaving Black without resource
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