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M Skalicka vs F Havlicek
Mlada Boleslav-B (1913)
French Defense: Classical. Tarrasch Variation (C14)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 27.Rxg7+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-04-07  openingspecialist: <Banjo> Rd8 Nf8 defends you seem to be down the exchange also
Jun-04-07  Richerby: <alwazir: In fact, it's hard to find a move for white that doesn't win.> 27.♕h7/h8+ should lose pretty quickly. ;-)
Jun-04-07  Murphyman: I agree with D Zechiel that there is quite a bit to this. For example I felt the old grey matter being stretched quite a bit for a monday morning - visualising a few situations such as what would happen if 27. exd7 before realising that the rook sac was the likely winner due to Rxg7 dropping the black queen. When I then calculated out I only looked at 28..Kf8 29. Qh6+ Rg7+ 30. Qxg7 #. Didnt see the 28).. Kf6 line at all and MostlyAverageJoe highlights a mate in 7 and mentions multiple possible lines.
Jun-04-07  willyfly: if 28...♔f8 then 29 ♕h8#
if 28...♔f6 then 29 ♕h6+ ♕g6 30 ♕xg6#
if 28...♕g6 then 29 ♕xg6+ then after 29...♔f8 or ♔h8 30 ♕g8#
Jun-04-07  prinsallan: Nice to see a solution without a queensac on a monday! Good work CG.com.
Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: We should expect harder Monday puzzles after following the Candidates matches. Seeing so much good chess probably raised everyone's rating at least 200 points.
Jun-04-07  bogo78: <The best defense produces a mate in 7 - something I don't recall on Mondays.> Right, but if from the 3rd move you are way ahead in material ♕ and ♙ for ♖ Then i guess thats the point of the puzzle for a monday.
Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: <willyfly> actually if 28.... Kf6 then 29. Qxf5#
Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: The demolition sacrfice 27. Rxg7+! wins the Queen after the deflection 27...Rxg7 or decoys the King for a quick mate after 27...Kxg7 28. Rg1+ Kf6 29. Qh6+ Qg6 30. Qxg6#.
Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: Good Monday puzzle. It employs a theme that we often see:

1. A rook sac serves as a battering ram to crack the defense. The rook is typically captured by the king.

2. The other rook (usually on the 1st rank) slides over to the same file that the first rook was on; joining the attack with check.

As is usually the case, the exposed king is no match for the onslaught.

Jun-04-07  Crowaholic: More complicated than most mondays. I mean, no queen sac? But after this option was ruled out, the rook sac is easy to see. Capture with the king and 28. Rg1+ Kf6 29. Qh6+ Qg6 30. Rxg6#.

Don't capture (27. ..Kf8) and 28. Qh8#.

Capture with the rook and there goes the queen. But how long until White mates? It obviously takes longest that way. I can say with confidence that I solved this question satisfactorily because one of the longest lines I found (using a virtual board, I confess) is

27. Rxg7+ Rxg7 28. Qxe8+ Nf8 29. e7 Rxe7 30. Qxe7 Ng6 31. Rg1 Be6 32. Rxg6+ Kh8 33. Qg7#

was a) later confirmed by my computer to be the result of best play by both sides and b) actually the same line that the Spike engine gives except that Spike would have played 31. ..c5 which fails equally well to delay the mate (but Be6 at least tries, come on!).

Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Unusual for a Monday. White gives black two choices to counter ♖xg7 either black can lose his queen for a rook or face a quick checkmate from rook and queen.

28...♔f6 29 ♕h6+ ♕g6 30 ♕xg6# (not 29 ♕g5+ as the king takes e6)

28...♔f8 29 ♕h8#

Jun-04-07  wakahakamaka: As easy as these monday puzzles are, i find it funny that real players actually played these games, and the loser gets himslef into these "easy" postitions.
Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Since this is NBA finals week,it's strange to see Havlicek on the losing side---I know it's not the same guy,but the name brings thought to hoops.
Jun-04-07  AlfieNoakes: its the Knight sac that was really great, demolishing the kingside
Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: <kevin86>. I don't see why after 28...Kf6 you wouldn't just play 29. Qxf5#. Unless you wanted to torture your opponent ;-)
Jun-04-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  fm avari viraf: I think, the winning move is 22.Ng5+ & Black is forced to accept it. The rest is all tactics & techniques where Black is just blown away.
Jun-04-07  willyfly: <wakahakamaka> good point. It's easy for us to find the solution because we have been prompted that there <is> a solution, <when> there is a solution and <what type> of solution we are looking for. In the real game nobody leaned over and whispered into Skalicka's ear, "On move 27 you can sacrifice a ♕ or a ♖ which will lead to a decisive advantage because it's Monday."
Jun-04-07  MaczynskiPratten: Exactly; remember Spielmann's baffled comment on Alekhine, "I can see the final combinations as well as he can - but I can't get into the same positions".
Jun-04-07  MostlyAverageJoe: <fm avari viraf: I think, the winning move is 22.Ng5+> One move earlier, I think.

20 ... Qe6 is the first blunder (Nh4 or Nh8 are nowhere as bad), and 21. Qg2! capitalizes on it. Now the knight on g6 cannot move (or Qxg7#) and must be defended while only the king is available for the job. Clearly, Kf7 heads for trouble after c4, and Kh7 was played with the results as in the game.

With 23 ... Rf7, black digs himself deeper into the hole (could give up the knight and run: Kg8, not that it would help much in the long run, but it would slow down the white a bit).

With 25 ... Qe8, black provides the final nail in the coffin (Nf6 would be better), but white, instead of nailing it in with Rag1, goes for e6. No matter, black misses Nf6 once again and gets a forced mate in return.

Jun-04-07  soberknight: Havlicek stole the pawn! Havlicek stole the pawn! (I'm a fan of the Boston Celtics).

Great combination. I didn't see it because I've been gone for a while, and there were other good moves.

Jun-04-07  Fezzik: I wonder if the Romantic ethic of chess demanded that Black take the Rook before resigning. Clearly Black's best was to resign instead of taking the Rook.

Looking at the position, Havlicek (the loser of the game) probably saw the mating attack before he played 26...Re7.

Jun-05-07  MostlyAverageJoe: BTW, I need to give credit where it is due: both of my posts were aided with HIARCS11.1 MP.
Jun-05-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  fm avari viraf: <MostlyAverageJoe:One move earlier, I think.> Kindly, specify which move. Your analysis is good but conspicuous.
Jun-05-07  MostlyAverageJoe: <fm avari viraf: <MostlyAverageJoe:One move earlier, I think.> Kindly, specify which move.> Sorry for the unclear statement (in retrospect I see it might have been interpreted as a suggestion that Ng5 should have been done one move earlier - this is not what I meant).

Clarification: I think the winning move was 21. Qg2 - it seems markedly better than anything else that white could do at that point. I think that 21.Qg2 and your choice of 22.Ng5+ as the winning move both deserve an exclamation mark - one for forcing the black into a bad position, and the other on pushing him even deeper...

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