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Detlef Neukirch vs Ivan Radulov
"Ivan Idea" (game of the day Oct-08-06)
Europcup (1964)  ·  Spanish Game: Morphy Defense. Neo-Archangelsk Variation (C78)  ·  0-1
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Given 13 times; par: 29 [what's this?]

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find similar games 2 more D Neukirch/I Radulov games
sac: 15...Bc5 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-08-06  syracrophy: 8.d5 would have continued as in the game: C Mansfield vs Znosko-Borovsky, 1928. I saw no positive idea of the "combination" 12.Bxd7?, hunting the material, but White just recovered the exchange at the cost of a piece. A dumb idea.

15...Bc5!! can't be considered as a sacrifice because it's only "returning the piece" but indeed, I love to call it a "sacrifice" :-), opening the d-file with the "in-between" move 16...Be6!! <17.Qxe6 Qd1#>

The idea of 15...Bc5, was to play the pinning move 17...Qd5! <The white queen can't protect the d1-square and the bishop at the same time from another square that isn't the h5-square> This pin of the queen reminds me the game: Carlos Torre vs Lasker, 1925.

The idea of 19.Nxe4 was that after 19...Qxe4? 20.Bxe7 as the white bishop is no more pinned.

25...Ng6! <26.Qxg6 Qd1+! 27.Rxd1 Rxd1#>

26...Qxg2+! <Lovely way to remove both queens from the board with advantage for Black because of the extra piece. 27.Kxg2 Nf4+>

My conclusion to this game is that White was only hunting the material from the beginning of the game. 12.Bxd7? its a prove of it. 9.Rxe4? was a wrong exchange sacrifice because it obtained no advantage of any kind.

Oct-08-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: 16. Na3 would have given white some chances. After 16...Bd6 17. Nc4, what does black do?
Oct-08-06  syracrophy: <<al wazir>: 16. Na3 would have given white some chances. After 16...Bd6 17. Nc4, what does black do?>

16.Na3 Bxa3 17.bxa3 Qe8 <the best way to return the piece> 18.Qxe7 Qxe7 19.Bxe7 Re8 and Black has a diminute advantage for the pawn.

Oct-08-06  hellstrafer: <al wazir>

After 16. Na3, how about h6? 17. Bxh6 gxh6 18. Qf6+ Kg8 19. dxc5 Qf8. After that black still has a slight advantage.

Oct-08-06  syracrophy: <<hellstrafer: <al wazir>

After 16. Na3, how about h6? 17. Bxh6 gxh6 18. Qf6+ Kg8 19. dxc5 Qf8. After that black still has a slight advantage.>>

I think that after 16.Na3 h6 17.Bf6 seems to be better, as now White threats to play 18.Be5 <17...gxf6 18.Qxf6+ Kg8 19.dxc5>

Oct-08-06  hellstrafer: <syracrophy>

17. Bf6 is simply met with Qf8, no?

Oct-08-06  syracrophy: <<hellstrafer: <syracrophy>

17. Bf6 is simply met with Qf8, no?>>

17.Bf6 Qf8 18.Qxf8+ Rxf8 19.dxc5 gxf6 20.Rd1 Bc6 it's just the same: Black's winning.

But in fact, your variation is better than mine to the reply of 16.Na3

Oct-08-06  hellstrafer: Thanks.. I guess white was bad from the beginning then.
Oct-08-06  mahmoudkubba: I just wonder if the name Ivan refers in any way eityher to Ivan of Russia or also Ivan the boy whom one of them or both if the same one is the one who issued the rule that it is forcable to each man to have only one wife not more and also for women same.U C this law might be for the goodness of society or for the badness of it according to the inside of the issuer and/or the society people.
Oct-08-06  panzer6tiger: Ivan Radulov is from Bulgaria.
Oct-08-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <hellstrafer, syracrophy>: Thanks. If 16. Na3 h6 17. Bh4 g5 18. Qf6+, then 18...Kh7 (not 18...Kg8 19. Bxg5 hxg5 20. Qxg5+ K moves 21. Qxc5, with two connected outside passed Ps for the B).

I guess black gets an advantage in all lines.

Oct-08-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: It looked like black was really on the run. White's attack was short circuited by black's own threat against the white back row. Then the game was ended on a brilliant queen sac followed by a fork regaining the queen in post haste.
Dec-31-11  Sem: 15. ... Bc5 was new at that time.
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