chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Evgenij Miroshnichenko vs Michal Krasenkow
5th Individual European Chess Championship (2004), Antalya TUR, rd 10, May-25
Zukertort Opening: Sicilian Invitation (A04)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

NOTE: You are using our new chess viewer, "Olga." For more info see the Olga Quickstart Guide. You can switch back to the old viewer (pgn4web) from the pulldown menu below. If you have questions or suggestions see our Olga chessforum.

explore this opening
find similar games 1 more Miroshnichenko/M Krasenkow game
sac: 13.Qxc5 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can step through the moves by clicking the and buttons, but it's much easier to simply use the left and right arrow keys on your keyboard.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-03-09  TomOhio: <<<cheeseplayer: 22. Bh8! end of story! if accepts then 23.Qf8 #
if declines then 22..Qe8
23. Qf6 23..Qf8
then white king's bishop into play
24.Bc4!
then it's a lost cause after that! you can see how black is hanging himself>
>
>

Not quite as devastating as the other options, though it does eventually lead to a win.

If 24. Bc4
Then
24..... d5
25. Bxd5 Be6
26. Nxe6 Qh6
27. Ng5 Rf8
28. Nxf7 Rxf7
29. Bxf7+ Kf8
30. Bxg6+ Kg8
31. Bf7+ Kf8
32. Qxh6+ 1-0.

Apr-03-09  mworld: a lot of coordination that I totally missed as I instinctively went for the pawn grab :)
Apr-03-09  CHESSTTCAMPS: <TomOhio:> wrote <cheeseplayer: 22. Bh8! end of story! if accepts then 23.Qf8 # [snip] >

Sorry, but 22.Bh8? is a mistake refuted by 22...Qe7, as pointed out previously by other kibitzers. If white exchanges queens he has nothing for his material deficit. Anything else, and the bishop on h8 is hanging.

<Hy0gA:> wrote <22. Bb2 can be possbile?>

22...Qe7 is also the problem with 22.Bb2 because white's queen can't get to f6.

Apr-03-09  goodevans: <YouRang: I found 22.Nxh7 easily enough. Free pawn (22...Kxh7?? 23.Qf8 ~#). I also saw black's only defense is 22...Qe8 ...>

I think quite a lot of folk missed 22 ... Ne7, whereas I think it is actually black's best try. Moreover, many of those that did consider it thought 23 Qf4 was the right response.

In fact I think best play from both sides is

22 Nxh7 Ne7 23 Be5 Kxh7 24 Qxe7 Qxe5

See my earlier posts and those of <agb2002> and <johnlspouge>.

Apr-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: It looks like that pawn grab, 19...Qxb5?, was the losing move, allowing white a tempo to continue with 20 Ng5, below, seeing Nxh7.


click for larger view

Better for black was 19...Qe6, likely forcing a queen trade and diffusing white's attack.


click for larger view

Apr-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: <goodevans: <YouRang: I found 22.Nxh7 easily enough. Free pawn (22...Kxh7?? 23.Qf8 ~#). I also saw black's only defense is 22...Qe8 ...> I think quite a lot of folk missed 22 ... Ne7, whereas I think it is actually black's best try. Moreover, many of those that did consider it thought 23 Qf4 was the right response.

In fact I think best play from both sides is

22 Nxh7 Ne7 23 Be5 Kxh7 24 Qxe7 Qxe5 >

Indeed, I completely overlooked 22...Ne7.

However, by cheating (using a computer), I see that white might do better than 23.Be5: 23.Qc7! [diagram] threatens 24.Qd8+ with mate to follow.


click for larger view

What can black do?

If 23...Nc6 (guarding d8), then white has 24.Qf4! (threat Qh6 with mate to follow), and 24...Ne7 is a step behind in stopping mate: 25.Qh6 Nf5 26.Qf8+ Kxh7 27.Qh8#.

If 23...Kxh7, then 24.Qc4! (threat Qh4+ with mate to follow). Black can stop this with 24...Nf5, but then 25.Qxf7+ Kh6 26.g4! (threat: Qf8#), and black has no good way to stop it.

If 23...Qd1 (to block check at h5), then 24.Qxf7+ Kh6 25.Qg7+ Kh5 26.Qh7+ Kg4 27.Qh3+ Kf3 28.Qg2+ Kg4 29.Qe4+ Kh5 30.Qh4#

If 23...g5 (to open g6 escape square) 24.Qd8+ Kxh7 25.Qh8+ Kg6 26.g4! (sealing off f5 and h5) Nf5 27.Bb2! (threat: Qh5#) f6 28.Qxf6 Kh7 29.Qh8+ Kg6 30.Qh5#

Congratulations to anyone who saw all these lines back at move 22. :-)

Apr-03-09  TomOhio: <CHESSTTCAMPS> Allowed the assumption of the first response move... you're right, but I still like the ending to the lesser line.
Apr-03-09  goodevans: <YouRang> 23 Qc7! is an excellent move. Suddenly this is taking on the proportions of a Sunday puzzle.
Apr-03-09  TheIrateTurk: Is it me or is the puzzle starting position very very very very unconventional? The way the pieces are all bunched together like that? Looked odd to me!
Apr-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: <goodevans: <YouRang> 23 Qc7! is an excellent move. Suddenly this is taking on the proportions of a Sunday puzzle.>

Yes, but I think the main point here is that white didn't have to find 23.Qc7. I think your line <22 Nxh7 Ne7 23 Be5 Kxh7 24 Qxe7 Qxe5> is still an easy win for white. It might be more challenging if black's B and R were not so mobility challenged.

But as it is, I think white can put the queen on the 8th rank and bring out the LSB and start having fun while black tries to find time to get his pieces out of heck. :-)

Apr-03-09  oxcheck: At first I went for some crazy ideas like 21. Ne6, but this does no harm. Then I tried how to sneak behind black defences to exploit the unprotected 8 rank. No effect. For a while I was pondering 22. Qd5, but 22...Qe8 proves it useless. Later I sticked to the White Bishop, which is just rooting to be moved behind to clear the path for Queen. But... Nope.

And when I got stuck there, right idea came out of the nowhere. 22. Nxh7 and I stopped thinking, cause I suddenly figured all mating patterns in a blink of an eye. Funny that it took me so long, as my first thought was to move this Knight. If I were in a time scramble this might have been costly.

Apr-03-09  CHESSTTCAMPS: <TomOhio:> wrote <Allowed the assumption of the first response move... you're right, but I still like the ending to the lesser line.>

Understood. Yes that line was fun!

Regarding the line 22.Nxh7 Nxe7,

<YouRang> wrote
<[snip]I see that white might do better than 23.Be5: 23.Qc7! [diagram] threatens 24.Qd8+ with mate to follow. >

Nice find - I got to your diagram in my original analysis, but after 23....Kxh7, all I could see was 24.Qd8? Ng8. I completely missed 24.Qc4.

Apr-03-09  BoBBY FISCHEr: I thought in 22.Bh8. In my opinion this quiet move, have no defense for black.
Apr-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: <BoBBY FISCHEr: I thought in 22.Bh8. In my opinion this quiet move, have no defense for black.>

Interesting try, but it looks like black can simply force a queen exchange with 22...Qe7 (either exchange queens or lose your bishop).

After this black appears to be winning.

Apr-03-09  UnsoundHero: After 14...Qe6 15 Rd1 looks better than 15 Bh6. If 15 Bh6 Re8 16 Qc3 f6 17 Ng5 Qe5 18 Bd5+ Re6, and white is forced to liquidate his attacking position by making piece trades. After the trades, the Pd7 goes to e6, which helps black develop the rest of his queenside.

After 15 Rd1, black should try 15...d5, baiting a pawn to try and catch up in development. If then 16 Rxd5 b6 17 Qc4 Ba6 18 b5 Na5 19 Qd3 Bb7, black is finally fully developed. White can try to improve with 16 b5 instead of 16 Rxd5.

Apr-03-09  WhiteRook48: 22. Nxf7? or 22. Nxh7! was what I was thinking, due to 22...Kxh7?? 23. Qf8
Apr-03-09  ricardolopez: I think 22.Bb2 is enough too. Isn't it?
Apr-03-09  Arbiter58: <ricardolopez: I think 22.Bb2 is enough too. Isn't it?>

Unfortunately not. Was thinking that also for a while, but after 22...Qe7 I don't see how white continues its attack. After exchange of queens I would prefer actually black and the alternative 23. Qf4 d5 seems to allow black some development with Be6 later on.

Apr-03-09  Milesdei: I got this after thinking long and hard after 22.Nxh7. Like TomOhio, I chose 24. Bd3 to confound the knight, which has to move to f5 after 25.Qh6. After BxN Black can delay the inevitable with a few spite checks but White wins easily despite the loss of tempo.
Apr-03-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: That was too much for me. I saw 22 Nxh7 (and how it wins if the knight is taken) but could not manage to find the winning continuation after 22...Qe8. 23 Qf4 is a quiet move.
Apr-04-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: This whole game was quite interesting. Even using a computer engine I cannot see where Black actually makes any mistake.

Refusing the exchange sacrifice does not seem to leave him any better off.

Apr-04-09  computer chess guy: 19. .. ♕xb5 was wrong (.. ♕e6 was the only move).
Apr-04-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: Yes <computer chess guy> you are absolutely right about that. 19...Qe6 is the only move.

It still appears that White has an edge after 20 Qf4 even with Black's best play. But 19...Qxb5 was definitely a mistake.

Apr-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: For the Friday April 3, 2009 puzzle solution, White plays the demolition 22. Nxh7! to decisively weaken Black's King position.
Sep-10-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Yet again the neverending story of someone who belives his King is safe even without the Dragon bishop.
Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 4)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
22.? (Friday, April 3)
from Puzzle of the Day 2009 by Phony Benoni
22. Nxh7! solves a Friday puzzle
from Demolition of Pawn Structure: Sac on h7 (h2) by Jaredfchess
Black's bad bishop makes for a bad game
from Emove the Dutch games from this collection. by fredthebear
Black's bad bishop makes for a bad game
from Headed to Holland Next Year with Fredthebear by fredthebear
exchange sacrifices
by zatara
laszlosantha's favorite games
by laszlosantha
24 moves
from Chess Miniatures, Collection X by wwall
Instructive tactical ending
from vladedivac's favorite games by vladedivac
22.? very, very nice and instructive
from My Unsolved Puzzles by arsen387
98_A04-A06_Reti / Zukertort / sometimes w/(b3)
by whiteshark
Black's bad bishop makes for a bad game
from K Players by fredthebear
22.? (April 3, 2009)
from Friday Puzzles, 2004-2010 by Phony Benoni
22. Nxh7! solves a Friday puzzle
from Demolition of Pawn Structure: Sac on h7 (h2) by patzer2
my favorite games
by iywo
Other openings
by savya2u


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2017, Chessgames Services LLC