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Jose Raul Capablanca vs Benito Higinio Villegas
"Don't Cry For Me Argentina" (game of the day Aug-19-2014)
Exhibition Game (1914) (exhibition), Buenos Aires ARG, Aug-19
Queen Pawn Game: Colle System (D04)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <MaxPain> If <18...dxe3>:


click for larger view

White plays <19.Nxf6+>. If Black takes the knight he gets mated after 19...gxf6 20.Rg4+ Kh8 21.Bxf6#, so he must play <19...Kh8> and White replies <20.Rh4>:


click for larger view

Now White threatens 21.Rxh7#. If Black takes the knight, he gets mated in reverse order from the previous line: 20...gxf6 21.Bxf6+ Kg8 22.Rg4#. Aside from a couple of useless checks, Black can stop the mate only by <20...h6>:


click for larger view

And White plays <21.Rxh6+ gxh6 22.Nd5+>, winning the queen back and remaining with the material advantage of two minor pieces for a rook.

Black was good enough to see this, and went into the game line where White ended up with only a positional advantage. Which was the point of hte whole shebang. Let's go back to where this all began, after <18...cxd4>:


click for larger view

If White plays the natural line 19.Bxd4 Nxe5 20.Bxe5 Bxe5 21.Rxe5 Rfd8, Black has control of the d-file. With Capablanca's continuation, White controls the d-file.

So a combination most of us would thrill our grandchildren with was conceived and executed for nothing more than to win control of a file. It's almost wasteful.

Feb-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  yiotta: <Phony Benoni>Nice observation. Such brilliance for such a small positional advantage, it IS almost wasteful!
Feb-07-14  MaxPain: thanks Benoni
Aug-19-14  waustad: When looking at Benito Higinio Villegas it claims that there are 42 games but it won't let me look at any after game 25. I haven't run into this problem here before. Any suggestions?
Aug-19-14  Mr. V: <Waustad> Hi friend, I had the same problem all day. I think the website is acting up. I can't scroll beyond the first page of any game list.
Aug-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: 33.? Could make a good Monday/Tuesday problem.

On an unrelated note, good choice for GOTD, as this game apparently was played exactly 100 years ago. :)

Aug-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <Benito Muscled Out - oh!>
Aug-19-14  Castleinthesky: It seems (without computers) that 26..Kf8 was a questionable move and perhaps h6 earlier, creating luft earlier would have been better. After the move Capa is able to take over the game with pawn advancement.
Aug-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White his a rook and pawn for the queen...but that will soon be changed:

Classic win by capa.

Aug-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: Champagne chess. Capa makes it look so easy.

The move I'm geeking about is the sly 28. Qe4


click for larger view

The black c5 pawn isn't going anywhere, so Capa doesn't rush to recapture it. Meanwhile his queen spreads its influence on both sides of the board.

Fritzie doesn't get too interested until black makes his fatal 31... Rd6 mistake. But what does he know, eh?

Excellent analysis by Phony, BTW.

Aug-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  caracas1970: nice analysis
Aug-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: Did this game have a previous pun? (perhaps "It takes a Villagas")
Aug-19-14  Francio: The pun it's the english translation for "No llores por mí Argentina",a song from the argentine group Serú Girán.
Aug-19-14  Funicular: @Francio Actually it's originally from the musical piece of Evita. Serú Girán then released a live album with that title, including the same name for the first song. But it was years after ALW's musical.

Rd6 loses on the spot. The question is, could black've done any better to hold the position? And if so, would capa eventually have overrun him anyway? I guess YES to both. It's hard to prevent white from queen sac into promoting.

Jun-10-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Hooper and Brandreth in <The Unknown Capablanca> end this game at move 33.Qxe5+ Kf8 33.Qxd6+ 1-0.

This game was one of ten exhibition games Capablanca played on his 2nd South American Tour.

This game was played in Buenos Aires on August 19, 1914.

Jun-14-17  vrkfouri: Hey guys, Black could save this game:

22... a5 !

1-) 23. b4 Rac8 24.c5 Rxd4 25.Qxd4 g6 26. c6 bxc6 27. b6 Qb7 28.Qc5 Rb8

23. a3 is a good idea , instead b4.

White is better, of course.But i think black is safe

Jun-14-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <vrkfouri>
<22...a5>
I think Capa would reply <23. Qd2> Rxd4 24. Qxd4 to control the d-file.
Apr-20-18  Rat1960: The what if line for some reason is always left short: 18. .. dxe3 19. Nxf6+ Kh8 20. Rh4 h6 21. Rxh6+ gxh6 22. Nd5+ Kh7 23. Nxc7 most leave it here but the what if really has to consider the back row mate and trapped knight e2 24. Re1 Rad8 25. f3 a6 26. Be5 Rd7 27. Rxe2 Rc8 28. Kf2 Rcxc7 29. Bxc7 Rxc7 30. Rd2 Kg6 31. Ke3 Easy at that point if you can play rook endgames.
May-07-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

I've been doing some observing.

Sudden increase by all the nations in Mars and can we live there.

The Brits spend millions try and land a on a passing comet. Just to see if they can do it.

The Americans are soon going to try and deflect a harmless passing asteroid with a missile just to see if they can do it.

The Chinese are landing things on the dark side of the moon. (not telling us why but when asked: 'just to see if we can do it.)

Richard Branson is getting ready to take the super rich off the planet with his Virgin Galactic.

Something nasty is coming our way and we are not being told. (else we will all stop paying mortgages, the financial system will collapse and the super rich cannot get away.)

We must save Chess and launch it off the planet.

Board, pieces, rules and to keep things light only one game is allowed. (my variation of the plane is crashing and there is only one parachute joke.)

What game do you choose?

I'll pick this game Capablanca vs B H Villegas, 1914 ( was originally going to say 'Fools Mate' as that would sum up mankind perfectly. But no. We did a few things right.)

Morphy at the Opera a close second.

---

May-08-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<Sally Simpson> What game do you choose? I'll pick this game Capablanca vs B H Villegas, 1914>

Interesting choice of games, although I have no idea why. The final combination was so simple that even I could see it immediately. FWIW, this is the game I would pick: Rotlewi vs Rubinstein, 1907. I think it's very instructive how in an almost symmetrical position Rubinstein took advantage of 2 Rotlewi innacuracies (10.Qd2 and 11.Bd3) to gain 2 tempi and launch an irresistible k-side attack after Rotlewi's 3rd inaccuracy (18.e4) opening up lines for Black's bishops. And, of course, the final position is great.

And, since you listed your second game, I'll list mine: Portisch vs Tal, 1964, a draw no less. I think it epitomizes the play of the "Magician from Riga".

But I'm somewhat surprised that in addition to launching board, pieces, and rules off the planet you didn't also include computers and chess engines. :-D

May-08-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

AylerKupp,

I've always liked this game. It's not the final combination, the whole game has something which appeals to me. (this and the Opera game give you a feeling 'hey, I can play like that.)

A quiet opening opening, minor mistakes from Black. The sudden Queen sac in the notes. Just when Black relaxes thinking he can hold this. BANG! The snap finish.

Note both games I picked are friendlies, easy to understand yet infectious. Don't want to scare them away with too complex a game.

But I fear these aliens will program the rules into their Galaxy Games Computer (every spaceship has one) and bust chess. They may also deduce from the game that it probably came from a species that had 8 digits and a lot of spare time.

***

May-08-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: <Sally Simpson> It's a world powers arms race to knockout opposing satellites and blind the opponent. War has become high tech, cyber savvy, and long range; it's not about men shooting rifles at each other anymore. The space race is also a search for minerals, elements as the earth's natural supply will eventually run out. It's a question of whether robots can "live" afar (and maintain rule as soldiers of science and war). That's no game. Richard Branson would greatly miss all of earth's amenities, but yeah, being "first" would secure his place in history.

They'd better take analog chess clocks with them, because the Energizer Bunny won't be found up there. Perhaps a magnetic set is also necessary.

<hey, I can play like that> is a good expression. Capablanca made this queenside pawn majority and a few basic tactics look so smooth and logical.

May-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Hi Fred,

<hey, I can play like that> is a good expression.

Games like this can be used to suck the student in. They seem so simple yet have that pleasing hook.

I grimace if I see someone telling a beginner to study Tal's greatest games, some of them would scare them witless. (they do me!)

"No way can I play like that." would be the war cry and goodbye to a potential chess player because the game is too difficult.

There was only one Tal and nigh impossible of all the greats to emulate.

First get them in the water doing the breast stroke. They will love it. If later they want to go skin-diving with hungry sharks that is up to them. But first teach them how easy it is to swim. Your job is done.

(of course 30-40 years from now, as happened to me recently, someone will come up and curse you for leading them astray and wasting their life on chess because you infused with them with your love for the game all those years ago...he was joking but I still felt chuffed to tea breaks.)

***

May-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: <Sally Simpson> Agreed. Tal's sacrifices can be too difficult to comprehend. The beginner needs to see a sham sacrifice with immediate reward/clarification (coming out ahead on the point value system, or mating). Here, Capablanca's queen sacrifice will be rewarded with a pawn promotion for a new queen that in turn protects the rook, a piece ahead. Extra material force should win.

FTB also likes the fact that all the pieces were actively used in reasonable order in Capa's game.

We teach beginners (mobility), checkmate patterns, stalemate patterns, and common tactics. A combination is a sacrifice followed by a tactical capture and/or check. When a student starts seeing combinations, s/he has raised the level of play. One usually learns this sacrificial concept the hard way in their own lost games against better players.

Unfortunately, showing students combinations too soon can badly backfire. FTB has seen the adverse affects, where the student captures everything in sight and loses material (knight takes pawn is not a combination). The point value system needs some emphasis by itself, yet a seasoned player knows that sustaining the initiative is often more important than material at the moment. Therefore, we're in no hurry to teach sacrificial combinations. The other factors/building blocks of chess must be clear first. We're generally striving to GAIN material (and simplify), not give it away. A sacrifice example must always be preceded by clarification: "Normally, we don't play queen takes rook because the queen has a greater value..."

Be careful about introducing combinations too soon -- and always count the gain afterwards. Give to get in return.

Ah, conversations with former students... stay positive, warm and friendly, be complimentary when possible, don't linger too long, and use a few clichés, such as "Life is what you make of it." Serve as the motivator and leave them feeling better about themselves. Regardless of his remarks, I'll bet that chap looks up to you in the biggest way!! Strive to remain that giant image on a pedestal in the memory of his glory days of long ago. (Those who get too chummy, too personal, clingy, intrusive are referred back to their own friends of their same age, siblings/relatives, or a community organization for help.)

The facts, the details, the score fades from memory, but they never forget how we made them FEEL.

May-09-19  RookFile: 16....b5 would have given black good play.
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