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Samuel Reshevsky vs Svetozar Gligoric
Reshevsky - Gligoric (1952), New York, NY USA, rd 5, Jun-10
Queen's Gambit Declined: Exchange. Positional Variation (D35)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-22-05  Backward Development: Very subtle tactic by Reshevsky. The loose queen and discovered check motifs are clear, as is the deflection of the c-pawn, I unfortunately was trying to force some sac on d5 which wasn't working. oh well.
Jul-22-05  VishyFan: is there anything wrong with 18. ♘cxd5 or 18. ♘fxd5 ?
Jul-22-05  Nicholson: I figured this one out all the way to 24. Rc1, but then lost the thread.
Jul-22-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  crafty: 18. ♘cxd5 ♘xd5 19. ♘xe6 ♘xe6 20. ♗xd6 ♕xd6 21. ♗c4 h5   (eval -3.00; depth 15 ply; 500M nodes)
Jul-22-05  Greginctw: i saw it all but didnt think the win of a pawn was enough so then settled on this totally bogus line of Nxe6. I guess a pawn is enough to make this a combination.
Jul-22-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  crafty: 18. ♘fxd5 ♘xd5 19. ♗xd6 ♘xc3+ 20. ♕xc3 ♕xd6 21. ♗c2 h5   (eval -3.05; depth 15 ply; 500M nodes)
Jul-22-05  yataturk: I don't get it... Right before 18, sides have equal material.. After a lot of checking and exchanges at 24 black is one pawn down... Was all that for a single pawn?
Jul-22-05  farrooj: a pawn can win the game. In an endgame, a pawn means clear advantage...so that whole combination was: 1. to get an extra pawn 2.get to an endgame (3. get the bishop pair)
Jul-22-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: Yes, in today's problem the best White can do (when faced with the best defense) is win a pawn in a superior endgame.
Jul-22-05  woodenbishop: Absolutely killer game played by the late great Reshevsky!
Jul-22-05  SamuelS: Unfortunatelly, I had seen this game before, so I knew that the knight would come to b5. But it's a nice combination anyway.
Jul-22-05  VishyFan: thanks <crafty>........
Jul-22-05  rya: pawn up and a pair of bishops = win
Jul-22-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: No doubt, <Rya>. I'm surprised Gligoric bothered to play on.
Jul-22-05  I Pawn You: Now now. Wait just one minute.
What I see is this:
18. Nxe6 Nxe6 19. Nb5 cxb5 20. Qxc6 Bxc7 21. Bxc7+ And wins a rook for a bishop. What am I missing?
Jul-22-05  euripides: <IPawn> the knight on e6 provides an extra guard to c7.
Jul-22-05  belka: I think the bishop pair and the initiative is worth more than the pawn ... but in any case it is a winning endgame and that's the point
Jul-22-05  I Pawn You: GAH! Alrighty then. ;P
Jul-22-05  ellipotrix: It is unclear to me why black plays 39..a6 instead of 39..fxe3? Does someone know I can see a combination
whereby black gets his pawn back.
But I must be mising something.
Jul-22-05  Dres1: <Ohio chessfan> Although a pawn and two bishops is a clear advantage, i dont think its reason to resign, you can save worse games than that.
Jul-22-05  Koster: after 39..fxe3 white still keeps the extra pawn and should win but it's probably the best chance for black since a6 lost very quickly.
Jul-22-05  Knight13: I saw 18. Nb5 but I couldn't work it out after 19. Qxc7 Kxc7. I didn't see 20. Rxc7.
Jul-22-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White gains a pawn-but also has two bishops vs two knights in an open position,surely equivalent to another pawn-----I know,don't call me Shirley!
Jul-22-05  southeuro: I agree with I pawn you. I think Ne6 is stronger.
Jul-22-05  xxdsdxx: I got the theme of the game, Bishop pair vs Knight pair, and the desire to clear the rooks off the board, but fell short after 23. Bxb5+ Ke7. There is no way to force the black rook out of the game. Fortunately for White, Black voluntarily did that for him with 26... Rc8. In Black's shoes, I would be wanting to cash in a Knight for one of those nasty Bishops to make this game more manageable and try to keep my last Rook. Rook-Knight vs Rook-Bishop leaves a better chance to remove White's extra pawn before it turns into a Queen.
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